12

In .NET 3.5, I'd like to create a singleton interface:

interface ISingleton <T>
{
  public static T Instance {get;}
}

Of course that doesn't work but is what I'd like. Any suggestions?

EDIT: I just want it to be known that all singeltons will have a static property named Instance of the class type. It is always there. An interface would be an explicit way to express this.

12

An Interface can't, to my knowledge, be a Singleton since it doesn't actually exist. An Interface is a Contract that an implementation must follow. As such, the implementation can be a singleton, but the Interface can not.

  • 1
    I think the OP meant something different. I understand the following question: "How would an interface description for a singleton class look like in C#?" – Dirk Vollmar Jan 14 '09 at 22:22
  • You can't specify a singleton class from an interface since an interface only specifies a contract that the implementing class can meet in any way it sees fit. – Matthew Brubaker Jan 14 '09 at 22:25
  • 2
    AFAIK in C# an interface cannot have a static member. However, there ARE instances in which a static member would have been useful. For example, you want a CONTRACT of implementations but all those implementations happen to need a classifier that is shared among instances of the object. It has not been the first time I have needed such thing. – Lord of Scripts Jun 1 '12 at 4:37
7

While I agree with other posters that singletons are very much over used, a possible solution to your question is to provide an abstract base class with a type parameter of the derived singleton:

public abstract class Singleton<T> where T : Singleton<T>
{
  private static T _instance;

  public static T Instance
  {
    get { return _instance; }
    protected set { _instance = value; }
  }
}

Any class that derives from Singleton will have a static Instance property of the correct type:

public class MySingleton : Singleton<MySingleton>
{
    static MySingleton()
    {
        Instance = new MySingleton();
    }

    private MySingleton() { } 
}

Before using something like this though you should really think about whether a singleton is required or if you are better off with a normal static class.

  • This does not work at all. MySingleton.Instance is always null and the static constructor ends up not being called at all (VS2008 .NET 3.5) – David Knight Dec 16 '11 at 15:53
  • Yep. You're right. Accessing the Instance property on Singleton<T> does not cause the static constructor on MySingleton to be invoked. It's pretty trivial to rearrange this to make it work but, really, why would you? – Andrew Kennan Dec 19 '11 at 1:32
4

Ok I made this answer a Wiki, because I am just going to offer an opinion that is at a tangent to your question.

I personally think that Singletons are waaay overused, its a use case that IMO is actually reasonably rare, in most cases a static class would suit the use case much better, and in other cases just a factory created imutable object is the best choice, an actual singleton is much rarer than people think.

I wouldn't have an interface to describe a common pattern for this, as I would actually want each and every use of a singleton to be thought about very carefully and justified.

2

I just want it to be known that all singeltons will have a static property named Instance of the class type. It is always there. An interface would be an explicit way to express this.

Write a unit test instead.

2

I know it's not your question, but how many singletons do you have such that you require an interface? This smells like bad design to me - can you explain clearly why these classes should be singletons rather than instances? If your answer is memory, I would suggest your overthinking your application, and if you're really concerned, look into the flyweight pattern (or perhaps a simple factory pattern). Sorry for not answering the question directly, but this doesn't sound like a great idea.

1

Besides that it does not work, as you state, how would you use this interface and an implementing class?

You might try with a Factory-style interface

interface ISingletonFactory<T>
{
    public T Instance {get;}
}

public class SingletonFactory: ISingletonFactory<Singleton>
{
    public Singleton Instance {get { return Singleton.Instance;}}
}

public class Singleton
{
    private Singleton foo;
    public static Singleton Instance { get { return foo; } }
}
  • This is not an answer, why did you not use the add comment feature? – AnthonyWJones Jan 14 '09 at 21:41
  • just added the answer ;) – devio Jan 14 '09 at 21:42
0

Given the classic notion of OOP of Interface which defines it as a Contract between implementing classes, you can't add such a thing as a static method to it. If you could do, you would be ending in something more similar to an abstract class in wich you have a partial implementation of your class and other parts demanded to the extending classes.

0

As pointed out, you can't do this and there are good reasons why you shouldn't.

The method I've implemented in the past creates a interface and an abstract base class that implements the interface. It looks something like this:

public interface IMyCompanySetting
{
    XmlNode Serialize();
    IMyCompanySetting Deserialize(XmlNode pattern);
    string SettingName { get; }

string Key { get; } object SettingValue { get; set; } SettingScope Scope { get; set; } }

public abstract class MyCompanySettingBase : IMyCompanySetting
{
    public MyCompanySettingBase() {}
    public MyCompanySettingBase(XmlNode pattern)
    {
        Deserialize(pattern);
    }
    #region IMyCompanySetting Members

    public abstract XmlNode Serialize();
    public abstract IMyCompanySetting Deserialize(XmlNode pattern);
    public abstract string SettingName{ get; }
public abstract string Key { get; }
    public abstract SettingScope Scope{ get; set; }
    public abstract object SettingValue{ get; set; }

    #endregion

public static XmlNode WrapInSettingEnvelope(XmlNode innerNode, IMyCompanySetting theSetting)
{
    // Write the top of the envelope.
    XmlTextWriter xtw = null;
    MemoryStream theStream = OpenSettingEnvelope(theSetting, ref xtw);

    // Insert the message.
    xtw.WriteNode(new XmlTextReader(innerNode.OuterXml, XmlNodeType.Element, null), true);

    // Close the envelope.
    XmlNode retNode = CloseSettingEnvelope(xtw, theStream);
    return retNode;

}

public static MemoryStream OpenSettingEnvelope(IMyCompanySetting theSetting, ref XmlTextWriter theWriter)
{
    MemoryStream theStream = new MemoryStream();
    theWriter = new XmlTextWriter(theStream, Encoding.ASCII);
    System.Type messageType = theSetting.GetType();

    string[] fullAssembly = messageType.Assembly.ToString().Split(',');
    string assemblyName = fullAssembly[0].Trim();

    theWriter.WriteStartElement(theSetting.SettingName);
    theWriter.WriteAttributeString("type", messageType.ToString());
    theWriter.WriteAttributeString("assembly", assemblyName);
    theWriter.WriteAttributeString("scope", ConfigurationManager.ScopeName(theSetting.Scope));

    return theStream;
}

public static XmlNode CloseSettingEnvelope(XmlTextWriter xtw, MemoryStream theStream)
{
    XmlDocument retDoc = new XmlDocument();
    try
    {
        // Close the envelope.
        xtw.WriteEndElement();
        xtw.Flush();

        // Return the node.
        string xmlString = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(theStream.ToArray());
        retDoc.LoadXml(xmlString);
    }
    catch (XmlException)
    {
        string xmlString = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(theStream.ToArray());
        Trace.WriteLine(xmlString);
        retDoc.LoadXml(@"<error/>");
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        retDoc.LoadXml(@"<error/>");
    }
    return retDoc.DocumentElement;
}

}

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