38

is there a way to know the compiler instantiated code for a template function or a class in C++

Assume I have the following piece of code

template < class T> T add(T a, T b){
            return a+b;
}

now when i call

add<int>(10,2); 

I would like to know the function that compiler creates for int specific version.

I am using G++, VC++. It will be helpful if some can help me point out the compiler options to achieve this.

Hope the question is clear. Thanks in advance.

21

You can definitely see the assembly code generated by the g++ using the "-S" option.

I don't think it is possible to display the "C++" equivalent template code - but I would still want a g++ developer to chime in why - I don't know the architecture of gcc.

When using assembly, you can review the resulting code looking for what resembles your function. As a result of running gcc -S -O1 {yourcode.cpp}, I got this (AMD64, gcc 4.4.4)

_Z3addIiET_S0_S0_:
.LFB2:
    .cfi_startproc
    .cfi_personality 0x3,__gxx_personality_v0
    leal    (%rsi,%rdi), %eax
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

Which really is just an int addition (leal).

Now, how to decode the c++ name mangler? there is a utility called c++filt, you paste the canonical (C-equivalent) name and you get the demangled c++ equivalent

qdot@nightfly /dev/shm $ c++filt 
_Z3addIiET_S0_S0_ 
int add<int>(int, int)
  • If people were allowed to see the generated template code, it would probably be too much to read anyway... in case of the STL – Johan Kotlinski Dec 16 '10 at 10:48
  • 4
    Well, people are allowed to see the generated assembly, it is quite a bit already, however, sometimes it is just what you need to gain valuable insight.. – qdot Dec 16 '10 at 19:22
  • 1
    @qdot it is completely different to see the assembly and the c++ generated code. Sometimes you want to generate the hierarchy of the classes by using the TypeLists then you probably will need to see the results as a c++ code just to be sure in your hierarchy. Assembly doesn't help at all in this case. – AlexTheo Jan 19 '13 at 14:00
32

If you want to see the assembly output, use this:

g++ -S file.cpp

If you want to see some (pseudo) C++ code that GCC generates, you can use this:

g++ -fdump-tree-original file.cpp

For your add function, this will output something like

;; Function T add(const T&, const T&) [with T = int] (null)
;; enabled by -tree-original

return <retval> = (int) *l + (int) *r;

(I passed the parameters by reference to make the output a little more interesting)

31

Clang (https://clang.llvm.org/) can pretty-print AST of instantiated template:

For your example:

test.cpp

template < class T> T add(T a, T b){
    return a+b;
}

void tmp() {
    add<int>(10,2); 
}

Command to pretty-print AST:

$ clang++ -Xclang -ast-print -fsyntax-only test.cpp

Clang-5.0 output:

template <class T> T add(T a, T b) {
    return a + b;
}
template<> int add<int>(int a, int b) {
    return a + b;
}
void tmp() {
    add<int>(10, 2);
}
  • I believe this is the best answer the OP is looking for (when compared with the other alternatives). – Anubis Aug 15 at 19:49
4

The easiest is to inspect the generated assembly. You can get an assembly source by using -S flag for g++.

3

When the optimizer has done its deeds, you most likely have nothing left that looks like a function call. In your specific example, you'll definitely end up with an inlined addition, at worse. Other than that, you can always emit the generated assembler in a separate file during compilation, and there lies your answer.

2

If your looking for the equivalent C++ code then no. The compiler never generates it. It's much faster for the compiler to generate it's intermediate representation straight off than to generate c++ first.

0

Now there is an on-line tool which does this for you: https://cppinsights.io/ For example, this code

template<class X, class Y> auto add(X x, Y y) {
  return x + y;
}

int main()
{
  return add(10, 2.5);
}

Is translated to

template<class X, class Y> auto add(X x, Y y) {
  return x + y;
}

/* First instantiated from: insights.cpp:9 */
#ifdef INSIGHTS_USE_TEMPLATE
template<>
double add<int, double>(int x, double y)
{
  return static_cast<double>(x) + y;
}
#endif


int main()
{
  return static_cast<int>(add(10, 2.5));
}

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