2
from math import log

lliste = [2]
bovengrenspriem = eval(input('geef een getal van die je weten wil welke priemgetal het is? ',))

while not type(bovengrenspriem) == int:
    bovengrenspriem = eval(input('Foute invoer, geef een getal van die je weten wil welke priemgetal het is? ',))
    if type(bovengrenspriem) == int:
        break
counter = 2
x = 2
while lliste[-1] < bovengrenspriem or lliste[-1]== bovengrenspriem:
    liste = []
    for i in range (1,counter+1):
        if counter % i == 0:
            liste.append(i)
    if len(liste) == 2:
        lliste.append(counter)
        counter += 1
    else:
        counter +=1

lliste[:]= [float(p)for p in lliste]       
lliste[:]= [log(x[t]) for t in lliste]

The mistake seams to be here. with 'int' object is not subscriptable, the float line is me testing out if converting every number in my list to float could fix it but it seams not to work

 a = sum (lliste)
    result = a/bovengrenspriem
    print (result)
  • 1
    Post the full stack trace – juanpa.arrivillaga Jun 11 '17 at 19:40
  • 1
    As an aside, using eval then checking the resulting type is probably not the best habit to get into for working with outside input. – juanpa.arrivillaga Jun 11 '17 at 19:41
  • 2
    What do you think log(x[t]) does? Because it definitely doesn't do what you think. – Aran-Fey Jun 11 '17 at 19:43
  • Also, your while loop has a condition of while not type(bovengrenspriem) == int But then you explicitly check if type(bovengrenspriem) == int: break which is redundant. – juanpa.arrivillaga Jun 11 '17 at 19:46
1

First things first... no reason to use eval here there is a much simpler way to do this:

bovengrenspriem = eval(input('geef een getal van die je weten wil welke priemgetal het is? ',))

while not type(bovengrenspriem) == int:
    bovengrenspriem = eval(input('Foute invoer, geef een getal van die je weten wil welke priemgetal het is? ',))
    if type(bovengrenspriem) == int:
        break

which would be:

while not bovengrenspriem.isdigit()

As for the error message.... You are trying to index an int in

x[t]
  • Sorry to be so out of order, I kinda understood what im messing up now. But how can I take the logarithm of every number in my list otherwise? – Hendrik Jun 11 '17 at 19:51
  • 1
    log(t) for t in lliste t is the element in the list as your iterating over it – Pythonista Jun 11 '17 at 19:53
0

The problem seems to be in:

lliste[:]= [log(x[t]) for t in lliste]

x[t] expects that x is a list/array etc, and x is defined as 2 (an int), So an int is not subscriptable.

Also (except for the real problem, there are some easy improvements you can make):

in

if len(liste) == 2:
    lliste.append(counter)
    counter += 1
else:
    counter +=1

The counter is always increased, so you can write:

if len(liste) == 2:
    lliste.append(counter)

counter +=1

You can change

while lliste[-1] < bovengrenspriem or lliste[-1]== bovengrenspriem:

into

while lliste[-1] <= bovengrenspriem:

Write comments in English (however I'm from the Netherlands, so I understand Dutch).

Try to use good named variables and clear capitalization. lliste is probably a list, but what is the first l and last e? lListE would be more clear, but better would be something like primeListEnd (?) or something more approriate.

Change

bovengrenspriem = eval(input('geef een getal van die je weten wil welke priemgetal het is? ',))

while not type(bovengrenspriem) == int:
    bovengrenspriem = eval(input('Foute invoer, geef een getal van die je weten wil welke priemgetal het is? ',))
    if type(bovengrenspriem) == int:
        break

Into something like:

bovengrenspriem = None

while not type(bovengrenspriem) == int:
    ...

This saves the copy of the first duplicate original line.

However, even better is to use a separate boolean

upperBoundaryPrimeValid = False

while !upperBoundaryPrimeValid:
   ..
   if valid ... (pseudo code)
       upperBoundaryPrimeValid = True;
  • 2
    Just to nitpick: x[t] just expects that x implements a __getitem__ method which can handle whatever t is as an argument. Also, I think you meant list. – juanpa.arrivillaga Jun 11 '17 at 19:51
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga True (but in principle this is a list/array/collection that implements it indeed). – Michel Keijzers Jun 11 '17 at 19:53
  • 1
    Null isn't defined in Python. While built from C it's not C. You mean None they still shouldn't do that and xrange was deprecated in 3.x. – Pythonista Jun 11 '17 at 20:13
  • Also a boolean could be used to check the validity; than a None is not needed. And true, Python is a bit of time ago (worked at a company where 2.7 was used). Good to know and I will adapt the answer. – Michel Keijzers Jun 11 '17 at 20:34

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