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I want to "listen to" a mouse event only if a checkbox is clicked. Therefore I have the following code:

HTML

<input type="checkbox" id="magicLens" onchange="magicLens()">
<label for="magicLens">Magic Lens</label>

JS

function magicLens(){
  const magicLens_checked = document.getElementById('magicLens').checked;

  if (magicLens_checked === true){
      canvas.addEventListener('mousemove', e => {
         myAnonymous = arguments.callee;
         ...
         // draw something at the current mouse position
         // and therefore use the 'e' event object
    });
  }
  else {
      canvas.removeEventListener('mousemove', myAnonymous);
  }
}

Problem is, that the drawing (a lens) also occurs when the checkbox is not checked (false). I'm not even sure if removeEventListener() is the right way to deal with it (though I already tried the whole thing without it and result was the same).

Maybe you have a better idea to describe the issue in the title. Feel free to edit!

3
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It's easier to actually always listen to the event and in there check whether the checkbox is checked.

const canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');

canvas.addEventListener('mousemove', e => {
    const magicLens_checked = document.getElementById('magicLens').checked;

    if (!magicLens_checked) {
        return;
    }

    // Do something with e
    console.log(e);
});

You can check it out in this Fiddle. (I added the event listener to document, to avoid creating an arbitrary canvas, but it works the same way)

3
  • That will work. Thanks! Isn't that a little "performance critical" as it always creates a new variable and checks an if-condition when the cursor moves (even when I don't need it)? – Muad Jun 12 '17 at 11:54
  • Hardly. (I hope I don't say anything wrong, but...) In javascript we don't assign variables to memory, instead they are references to objects. These are instantiated with the new keyword. Regarding the if-condition checking, I created a little jsperf snippet to show you it hardly makes a difference: jsperf.com/if-case-in-mouseevent – Remy Kabel Jun 12 '17 at 12:13
  • Alright, thank you again! Definitely the easier way than removeEventListener()... – Muad Jun 12 '17 at 12:51
0

The Javascript engine sees what you pass to addEventListener and removeEventListener as two different functions which is why the removeEventListener is not working. Create a named function outside of these and pass it into them.

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