3

I would like to know if anyone has same trick to find the return type of the find_me function, without changing it's argument.

struct Stuck {
    Stuck() = delete;
    Stuck(Stuck&&) = delete;
    Stuck(const Stuck&) = delete;
    Stuck& operator=(Stuck&&) = delete;
    Stuck& operator=(const Stuck&) = delete;
};

double find_me(Stuck);

int main() {
    // This obviously don't work
    decltype(find_me(Stuck{})) test1;
}

This is another shot I tried:

template<typename T>
struct ConvertTo {
    operator T ();
}

int main() {
    decltype(find_me(ConvertTo<Stuck>{})) test1;
}

The function find_me is overloaded many many times, and never actually implemented. I just want to know if there's a way to find the return type when the function has these form. I know that it would be possible to receive a pointer or a reference, this is what I'm already doing, but I would like to know if there also some trick to make this work.

If there is any, please tell me, and tell me why.

Thanks.

10
  • If it's overloaded, no. – T.C. Jun 12 '17 at 21:16
  • @T.C. Thanks. I'll keep using a reference then. – Guillaume Racicot Jun 12 '17 at 21:18
  • What purpose could this find_me function possibly have, regardless of whether it's by-value or by-reference? – Brian Bi Jun 12 '17 at 21:20
  • @Brian I only use it to get the return type. The function is actually never implemented. – Guillaume Racicot Jun 12 '17 at 21:21
  • 2
    @Kobi That's C++17 "guaranteed elision" coupled with the fact that Stuck is an aggregate. – T.C. Jun 12 '17 at 22:00
5

This works:

struct Stuck {
    Stuck() = delete;
    Stuck(Stuck&&) = delete;
    Stuck(const Stuck&) = delete;
    Stuck& operator=(Stuck&&) = delete;
    Stuck& operator=(const Stuck&) = delete;
};

double find_me(Stuck);
void find_me(double);

template <typename Ret>
Ret get_stuck_return_type(Ret (*)(Stuck));

int main() {
    decltype(get_stuck_return_type(find_me)) test1;
}

Coliru link: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/7eca81a13fae9de3

The reason why this works even when find_me is overloaded is that the template argument deduction will try each overload of find_me. If deduction succeeds with exactly one overload, that one is chosen for instantiating the template.

I assume this is a purely academic exercise, since a function taking an unconstructible type by value could serve no actual purpose.

6
  • Yes that function will have a purpose. I use it to map some type to another. The function is never implemented. I use it in a metaprogramming context. – Guillaume Racicot Jun 12 '17 at 21:25
  • 2
    Doesn't work if any find_me is a template. template<class T> void find_me(double, T); will kill it. – T.C. Jun 12 '17 at 21:30
  • @T.C. I agree, I don't think there is a general solution to this problem. OP really ought to rethink his design goals. – Brian Bi Jun 12 '17 at 21:31
  • @Brian actually, I'll continue using const references as parameters. I was just curious about it :) – Guillaume Racicot Jun 12 '17 at 21:47
  • @GuillaumeRacicot a pointer would work too... (T*)0 is very easy to type – Brian Bi Jun 12 '17 at 21:48
0

std::declval does the trick:

decltype(find_me(std::declval<Stuck>())) test1;
1
  • 2
    use of deleted function 'Stuck::Stuck(Stuck&&)' – Guillaume Racicot Jun 12 '17 at 21:07
0

What about making the user add template specializations?

Your code:

template <typename T>
struct find_me
{
    struct please_add_your_own_find_me {};
    using type = please_add_your_own_find_me;
};

Client code:

template <>
struct find_me<Stuck>
{
    using type = double;
};

Then:

find_me<Stuck>::value test1;

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