4

I have created a simple data.tree through importing a folder structure with files inside of it.

if (!require("pacman")) install.packages("pacman")
pacman::p_load_gh("trinker/pathr")

library(pathr)
library(data.tree)

folder_structure <- pathr::tree(path = "/Users/username/Downloads/top_level/",
 use.data.tree = T, include.files = T)

Now, I would like to convert the object folder_structure into a data.frame with one row per folder and a column that specifies how many files each folder contains. How can I accomplish this?

For example, I have this very simply folder structure:

top_level_folder
    sub_folder_1
        file1.txt
    sub_folder_2
        file2.txt

Answering the question would involve creating an output that looks like this:

Folders             Files
top_level_folder    0
sub_folder_1        1
sub_folder_2        1

The first column can simply be generated through calling list.dirs("/Users/username/Downloads/top_level/"), but I don't know how to generate the second column. Note that the second column is non-recursive, meaning that files within subfolders are not counted (i.e. top_level_folder contains 0 files, even though the subfolders of top_level_folder contains 2 files).

If you want to see whether your solution scales or not, download the Rails codebase: https://github.com/rails/rails/archive/master.zip and try it on Rails' more complex file structure.

  • 2
    Where can I get the pathr package? – Roman Jun 13 '17 at 7:53
  • 1
    @Jimbou: github.com/trinker/pathr – histelheim Jun 13 '17 at 9:53
  • 2
    Can you clarify whether sub_folder_1 refers to the same folder? I.e. is it one folder with two files, or is it two folders---with the same name, which wouldn't work---and thus should be sub_folder_1 and sub_folder_2? – Felix Jun 15 '17 at 14:22
  • 2
    @Felix - that was a mistake, it should be sub_folder_2--sorry about that! I've corrected it in the question. – histelheim Jun 15 '17 at 14:46
3
+100

list.dirs() provides a vector of every subdirectory reachable from a starting folder, so that handles the first column of your data-frame. Very convenient.

# Get a vector of all the directories and subdirectories from this folder
dir <- "."
xs <- list.dirs(dir, recursive = TRUE)

list.files() can tell us the contents of each of those folders, but it includes files and folders. We just want the files. To get the count of files, we need to filter the output of list.files() with a predicate. file.info() can tell us whether a given file is a directory or not, so we build our predicate from that.

# Helper to check if something is folder or file
is_dir <- function(x) file.info(x)[["isdir"]]
is_file <- Negate(is_dir)

Now, we solve how to get the number of files in a single folder. Summing boolean values returns the number of TRUE cases.

# Count the files in a single folder
count_files_in_one_dir <- function(dir) {
  files <- list.files(dir, full.names = TRUE)
  sum(is_file(files))
}

For convenience, we wrap that function to make it work on many folders.

# Vectorized version of the above
count_files_in_dir <- function(dir) {
  vapply(dir, count_files_in_one_dir, numeric(1), USE.NAMES = FALSE)
}

Now we can count the files.

df <- tibble::data_frame(
  dir = xs,
  nfiles = count_files_in_dir(xs))

df
#> # A tibble: 688 x 2
#>                                                  dir nfiles
#>                                                <chr>  <dbl>
#>  1                                                 .     11
#>  2                                         ./.github      3
#>  3                                     ./actioncable      7
#>  4                                 ./actioncable/app      0
#>  5                          ./actioncable/app/assets      0
#>  6              ./actioncable/app/assets/javascripts      1
#>  7 ./actioncable/app/assets/javascripts/action_cable      5
#>  8                                 ./actioncable/bin      1
#>  9                                 ./actioncable/lib      1
#> 10                    ./actioncable/lib/action_cable      8
#> # ... with 678 more rows
1

You can use a dplyr chain with the parse_path() function from the pathr package. The tree function is basically just a wrapper around parse_path so it's easier to use parse_path directly. E.g. like this:

library(pathr)
library(dplyr)

fls <- dir("C:/RBuildTools/3.3", recursive = T, full.names = T) %>% 
parse_path() %>% 
index(4) %>% # this is where you indicate the level or "depth" 
             # of the folder of which want subfolder file counts
data.frame(folders = .) %>% 
group_by(folders) %>% 
tally() %>% 
arrange(n)

# if you want to get rid of all the files in your starting folder 
# just add a 
# filter(folder > 1) at the end of the dplyr chain

For me the above code produces the following result:

> fls
# A tibble: 12 × 2
        folders     n
         <fctr> <int>
1       COPYING     1
2    README.txt     1
3    Rtools.txt     1
4  unins000.dat     1
5  unins000.exe     1
6   VERSION.txt     1
7           bin    56
8    mingw_libs   200
9      texinfo5   356
10    gcc-4.6.3  3787
11     mingw_32 13707
12     mingw_64 14619
  • This does not seem to be working at all for me. I've updated the answer to show more specifically how the output needs to look. With your script I do not get any of the information necessary for the example folder structure. Also I am not sure what you mean by "depth"--where do you start counting the depth, and in which direction does it go? – histelheim Jun 15 '17 at 14:04
  • For example, if I call your function on "/Users/username/Downloads/top_level/" then I simply get Folder=Downloads and N=2. – histelheim Jun 15 '17 at 14:09
  • 1
    Ah, I see. Sorry, my answer was unclear. Theoretically, given your last example you should change index(4) to index(5), since you want to count all folders after the fifth slash or folder (that's what I meant with depth. I realize this was not clear, I'm going to reformulate it) – Felix Jun 15 '17 at 14:13
  • 1
    But I also realize that you asked for non-recursive folder count (i.e. not counting all the files in potential subfolders). That is a bit more tricky to do, since the R's dir() only has recursive = T/F option, not how deep the command should climb in the subfolders--which would be necessary for an exact count. I'll see whether I can come up with a solution for that problem, but let's first see if we can get the code above running on your machine – Felix Jun 15 '17 at 14:18
  • yes, if I set the folder depth to 5 and 6 respectively, I can get the file count for each of the 3 folders in the example. However, it is recursive. Also, how would I use this for a large and complex folder structure if I don't know all the folder depths? – histelheim Jun 15 '17 at 14:49
1
dir.create("top_level_folder")
dir.create("top_level_folder/sub_folder_1")
dir.create("top_level_folder/sub_folder_2")
a <- "hello"
save(a,file = "top_level_folder/sub_folder_1/file1.txt")
save(a,file = "top_level_folder/sub_folder_2/file2.txt")

path <- "top_level_folder"
files   <- list.files(path, recursive=TRUE)
folders <- sapply(strsplit(files,"/"),function(x){x[length(x)-1]})
output <- setNames(as.data.frame(table(unlist(folders))),c("Folders","Files"))

all_folders <- data.frame(Folders = list.dirs(path,full.names=FALSE,recursive=TRUE),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
all_folders$Folders[1] <- strsplit(path,",")[[1]][length(strsplit(path,",")[[1]])]

output <- merge(all_folders,output,all.x = TRUE)
output$Files[is.na(output$Files)] <- 0
output <- output[match(all_folders$Folders,output$Folders),]

#            Folders Files
# 3 top_level_folder     0
# 1     sub_folder_1     1
# 2     sub_folder_2     1
  • It works for that limited example, but as soon as I scale up to a more complex file structure it fails: Error in table(folders) : all arguments must have the same length – histelheim Jun 15 '17 at 15:10
  • You can for example download the Rails code base and try it on that: github.com/rails/rails/archive/master.zip – histelheim Jun 15 '17 at 15:12
  • 1
    I got the same error when trying it into my profram files full folder, but it works when I change folders into unlist(folders), can you try the new script ? – Moody_Mudskipper Jun 15 '17 at 15:17
  • I'd appreciate if downvoter could explain :) – Moody_Mudskipper Jun 15 '17 at 15:18
  • this seems to work. Is this recursive on non-recursive? – histelheim Jun 15 '17 at 15:19
1

All you really need to do is make a list of directories with list.dirs (which defaults to recursive = TRUE) and the iterate over it, finding the length of list.files (which defaults to recursive = FALSE) for that directory. Neatening to a nice data.frame,

library(purrr)

files <- .libPaths()[1] %>%    # omit for current directory or supply alternate path
    list.dirs() %>% 
    map_df(~list(path = .x, 
                 files = length(list.files(.x))))

files
#> # A tibble: 4,457 x 2
#>                                                                           path files
#>                                                                          <chr> <int>
#>  1              /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library   314
#>  2        /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind     9
#>  3   /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind/help     5
#>  4   /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind/html     2
#>  5   /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind/Meta     6
#>  6      /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind/R     3
#>  7      /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/acepack    14
#>  8 /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/acepack/help     5
#>  9 /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/acepack/html     2
#> 10 /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/acepack/libs     2
#> # ... with 4,447 more rows

or all in base if you prefer,

files <- do.call(rbind, lapply(list.dirs(.libPaths()[1]), function(path){
    data.frame(path = path, 
               files = length(list.files(path)), 
               stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
}))

head(files)
#>                                                                        path files
#> 1            /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library   314
#> 2      /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind     9
#> 3 /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind/help     5
#> 4 /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind/html     2
#> 5 /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind/Meta     6
#> 6    /Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Versions/3.4/Resources/library/abind/R     3
1

Here's a very compact solution:

print(folder_structure, 
      files = function(node) sum(Get(node$children, 'isLeaf')), 
      filterFun = isNotLeaf,
      pruneMethod = NULL
)

This produces something like this:

                                                     levelName files
1   data.tree                                                     16
2    ¦--data                                                       2
3    ¦--data_gen                                                   2
4    ¦--.git                                                       8
5    ¦   ¦--hooks                                                  9
6    ¦   ¦--info                                                   1
7    ¦   ¦--logs                                                   1
8    ¦   ¦   °--refs                                               1
9    ¦   ¦       ¦--heads                                          4
10   ¦   ¦       ¦--remotes                                        0
11   ¦   ¦       ¦   °--origin                                     5
12   ¦   ¦--objects                                                0
13   ¦   ¦   ¦--01                                                 4
14   ¦   ¦   ¦--02                                                 5
...

Note, however, that this counts empty folders as files too.

0

list.files returns all file and directory paths. There is no is.file function, but there is dir.exists. Since we know all the paths are actual nodes, those that aren't directories will be counted as files.

top_level <- '~/rails-master'
setwd(top_level)
subitems <- data.frame(
  path = list.files(
    include.dirs = TRUE,
    recursive    = TRUE
  ),
  stringsAsFactors = FALSE
)
subitems$is_file <- !dir.exists(subitems$path)

For each row, if the path is to a directory, then it's its own directory path. If the path's for a file, then its parent is the directory path. Then it's simply a matter of counting how often is_file is true by directory path.

subitems$dir_path <- ifelse(
  subitems$is_file,
  dirname(subitems$path),
  subitems$path
)
file_counts <- tapply(subitems$is_file, subitems$dir_path, sum)
result <- data.frame(
  Folders = names(file_counts),
  Files   = file_counts
)

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