Before each DAO test I clean my database and I need to reset the identity value of some tables. I've created the following stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE SET_IDENTITY
    @pTableName           varchar(120),
    @pSeedValue           int
AS
BEGIN
    DBCC CHECKIDENT(@pTableName, RESEED, @pSeedValue);
END

My problem is I need to call this stored procedure with a "normal" user. In order works, This user cannot be member of: sysadmin, db_owner, db_ddladmin.

I've tried with:

a) CREATE PROCEDURE WITH EXECUTE AS OWNER

b) EXECUTE AS USER = 'sa' before call DBCC CHECKIDENT

But in both cases I got back:

The server principal sa is not able to access the database my_db_name under the current security context.

I'm using Microsoft SQL Server Express (64-bit) 11.0.2100.60

Thank you in advance,

Abel

  • If your environment permits it, try ALTER AUTHORIZATION ON DATABASE::[mydb] TO [sa] to set the DB owner to something SQL Server can verify (ensure your database doesn't have a group account as an owner by design first!) EXECUTE AS OWNER should then work. For a more robust solution, you can use cryptographic signing to give the sproc the necessary permission, but this is much more involved. – Jeroen Mostert Jun 13 '17 at 19:40
  • Another possible solution, if "clean" means "clear the entire table", is to use TRUNCATE TABLE, which as a side-effect also resets the identity and requires only ALTER permission on the table. Also consider the use of database projects to have a clean, empty database that you can deploy before every test run (or every test, even, but that's probably too slow). Another option is to revert to a snapshot or detach/attach an empty DB. – Jeroen Mostert Jun 13 '17 at 19:48
  • The specs says you cannot use TRUNCATE TABLE on tables are referenced by a FOREIGN KEY constraint. – Abel ANEIROS Jun 14 '17 at 11:53
  • Indeed you can't, so for tables where that's the case, TRUNCATE TABLE is not a solution. – Jeroen Mostert Jun 14 '17 at 12:24
  • @JeroenMostert Module Signing doesn't need to be super complicated, especially if the permissions are database-level and confined to a single database. Please see my answer for a 4-step Asymmetric Key-based solution :-) – Solomon Rutzky Jun 28 '17 at 22:31

Caller has to own schema or be db_owner:

From doc: DBCC CHECKIDENT

Permissions

Caller must own the schema that contains the table, or be a member of the sysadmin fixed server role, the db_owner fixed database role, or the db_ddladmin fixed database role.

LiveDemo

  • @AbelANEIROS Did you try CREATE PROCEDURE WITH EXECUTE AS 'user_name' where 'user_name' owns schema or is db_owner? – Lukasz Szozda Jun 14 '17 at 16:51

This is easy enough to do, but generally speaking you shouldn't need to reset identity values each time. Specific identity values shouldn't matter, so the only concern should be potentially reaching the max value due to repeated testing. And in that case I would not recommend resetting each time as it is also a good test to let IDs reach high values so you can make sure that all code paths handle them properly and find areas that don't before your users do ;-).

That being said, all you need to do (assuming this is localized to a single DB) is create an Asymmetric Key, then create a User from it, then add that User to the db_ddladmin fixed Database Role, and finally sign your Stored Procedure with that same Asymmetric Key.

The following example illustrates this behavior:

USE [tempdb];

CREATE TABLE dbo.CheckIdent
(
  [ID] INT NOT NULL IDENTITY(1, 1) CONSTRAINT [PK_CheckIdentity] PRIMARY KEY,
  [Something] VARCHAR(50)
);

EXEC(N'
CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.SET_IDENTITY
    @pTableName           sysname,
    @pSeedValue           int
AS
BEGIN
    DBCC CHECKIDENT(@pTableName, RESEED, @pSeedValue);
END;
');

CREATE USER [MrNobody] WITHOUT LOGIN;

GRANT EXECUTE ON dbo.SET_IDENTITY TO [MrNobody];

-------

EXECUTE AS USER = N'MrNobody';
SELECT SESSION_USER AS [CurrentUser], ORIGINAL_LOGIN() AS [OriginalLogin];

EXEC dbo.SET_IDENTITY N'dbo.CheckIdent', 12;
/*
Msg 2557, Level 14, State 5, Procedure SET_IDENTITY, Line 7 [Batch Start Line 30]
User 'MrNobody' does not have permission to run DBCC CHECKIDENT for object 'CheckIdent'.
*/

REVERT;
SELECT SESSION_USER AS [CurrentUser], ORIGINAL_LOGIN() AS [OriginalLogin];

-------

CREATE ASYMMETRIC KEY [DdlAdminPermissionsKey]
  WITH ALGORITHM = RSA_2048
  ENCRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'not_a_good_password';

CREATE USER [DdlAdminPermissions]
  FROM ASYMMETRIC KEY [DdlAdminPermissionsKey];

ALTER ROLE [db_ddladmin] ADD MEMBER [DdlAdminPermissions];

ADD SIGNATURE
  TO dbo.SET_IDENTITY
  BY ASYMMETRIC KEY [DdlAdminPermissionsKey]
  WITH PASSWORD = 'not_a_good_password';

-------

EXECUTE AS USER = N'MrNobody';
SELECT SESSION_USER AS [CurrentUser], ORIGINAL_LOGIN() AS [OriginalLogin];

EXEC dbo.SET_IDENTITY N'dbo.CheckIdent', 12;
-- Success!

REVERT;
SELECT SESSION_USER AS [CurrentUser], ORIGINAL_LOGIN() AS [OriginalLogin];

Other minor notes:

  1. You cannot execute as User = sa since sa is a Login (server level) and not a User (database level). You can use EXECUTE AS LOGIN = 'sa'; but that then requires IMPERSONATE permission and is a security hole since the non-privileged Login can run EXECUTE AS LOGIN = 'sa' whenever they want. So don't do that.
  2. For variables / parameters that hold names of SQL Server objects, indexes, etc, you should use NVARCHAR and not VARCHAR. Most internal names use sysname which is a system alias for NVARCHAR(128), so sysname is usually the preferred datatype.

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