3

I managed to create simple chart with a border. I'd like to change simple border-color to a gradient. I was trying to use border-image or background property, but it's seems impossible to curve it so it can fit arched shape of a container. Is there any way to achieve that effect in css3 ?

HTML

<div class="pie">
    <span class="overlay"></span>
</div>

CSS

.pie {
    margin: 0 auto;
    position: relative;
    width: 116px;
    height: 58px;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.pie *,
.pie::before {
    box-sizing: border-box;
}

.pie::before {
    content: '';
    width: inherit;
    height: inherit;
    border: 20px solid grey;
    border-bottom: none;
    border-top-left-radius: 175px;
    border-top-right-radius: 175px;
    position: absolute;
    left:0;
}

.pie .overlay{
    position: absolute;
    top: 100%;
    left: 0;
    width: inherit;
    height: inherit;
    border: 20px solid;
    border-top: none;
    border-bottom-left-radius: 175px;
    border-bottom-right-radius: 175px;
    transform-origin: 50% 0;
    border-color:yellow;/* background: linear-gradient(to right, rgba(228,232,7,1) 0%, rgba(0,218,156,1) 100%); */
    transform: rotate(90deg); 
}
3
3

If you use the pie's pseudo and the overlay as the white center, you can do like this

.pie {
    margin: 0 auto;
    position: relative;
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    border-radius: 200px 200px 0 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}
.pie::after {
    transform: rotate(-60deg);      /*  set rotation degree  */
    background: linear-gradient(to right, rgba(228,232,7,1) 0%, rgba(0,218,156,1) 100%);
    transform-origin: center bottom;
}
.pie::before {
    border: 20px solid grey;
}
.pie .overlay{
    top: 20px;                      /*  match border width  */
    left: 20px;                     /*  match border width  */
    width: calc(100% - 40px);       /*  match border width times 2  */
    height: calc(200% - 40px);      /*  match border width times 2  */
    border-radius: 100%;
    background: white;
    z-index: 1;                     /*  move it on top of the pseudo elements  */
}
.pie *,
.pie::before,
.pie::after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    border-radius: inherit;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}
<div class="pie">
    <span class="overlay"></span>
</div>

1
  • Yes, that's exactly what I was looking for. – norbidrak Jun 13 '17 at 18:20
1

You can play with 2 gradients, the inner masking the outer:

.test {
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background-image: linear-gradient(white, white), linear-gradient(to left, red, green);
    background-clip: padding-box, border-box;
    background-origin: padding-box, border-box; 
    border: solid 50px transparent;
    border-radius: 200px 200px 0px 0px;
    border-width: 50px 50px 0px 50px;
}
    
<div class="test"></div>

.test {
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background-image: linear-gradient(white, white);
    background-clip: content-box;
    background-origin: content-box; 
    border: solid 50px transparent;
    border-radius: 200px 200px 0px 0px;
    padding: 50px 50px 0px 50px;
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.test:after {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    left: -25%;
    top: -50%;
    right: 0px;
    height: 300%;
    width: 150%;
    background-image: linear-gradient(to left, red, green);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform-origin: center center;
    z-index: -1;
    animation: spin 3s infinite;
}

@keyframes spin {
    from {transform: rotate(0deg);}
    to {transform: rotate(360deg);}
}
<div class="test"></div>

0

You could add an additional pseudo element on .pie (an ::after), position them as overlapping it at its top-left and top-right corners, curve them both, and use background for the gradient.

Then, position the span at the center of .pie and give it a white background (as opposed to transparent) with a higher z-index to make sure the center of the arc remains in tact.

div {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  position: relative;
}
div::before {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  background: linear-gradient(to right, azure, slategray);
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  left: 0;
  border-top-left-radius: 100px;
}
div::after {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  background: linear-gradient(to right, midnightblue, steelblue);
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  right: 0;
  border-top-right-radius: 100px;
}
div span {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  left: calc(50% - 50px);
  top: calc(50% - 50px);
  background: white;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  border-radius: 50%;
  z-index: 1;
}
<div>
  <span></span>
</div>

8
  • Yeah but it's just a single curved gradient filling whole semi-circle. Point of using "transform: rotate(90deg);" is to give different values to different charts to overlay main container. – norbidrak Jun 13 '17 at 17:28
  • It is actually two parts with different gradients. I just made the two gradients opposite of each other to make them look like one big one. I have updated the colors to show the two parts now. If that's not what you want, then it might be good to include a picture of your desired result in your post. – cjl750 Jun 13 '17 at 17:31
  • It has to be more dynamic. I need to have this overlay gradient filling with different sizes, like 80%, 25%, 30%(of a half pie), which i calculate by 180deg=100%. – norbidrak Jun 13 '17 at 17:37
  • You could accomplish something like that with a more complex gradient, such as linear-gradient(125deg, red, red 30%, blue 30%, blue 60%, gold 60% gold), but the shape of the pieces will not be a nice wedge shape like you probably want. More complex markup would be necessary. – cjl750 Jun 13 '17 at 17:47
  • It sounds like what you really want is a pie chart that you could just cover the bottom half of and then position a circle-shaped div on top of to make your desired arc shape. See here about pie charts. Also, it'd be good to update your question with all these requirements. – cjl750 Jun 13 '17 at 17:49

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