9

EDIT: This was apparently an issue with testing in the browser, not with the code. Sessions in Core are disabled by default as they should be.

Original question:

I'm working on a web API which needs to handle multiple requests concurrently, even from the same client. It is an ASP.NET Core MVC (1.1.2) app currently targeting the full framework (4.5.2), mostly for compatibility with other libraries.

When I first tested my concurrency, I was surprised that the requests were not concurrent at all. I googled around and found out that ASP.NET does not handle requests within a session concurrently, but instead queues them. A quick test shows that sessions are likely to be the culprit:

[HttpGet("sleep")]
public string Sleep()
{
   Thread.Sleep(5000);
   return $"Done at {DateTime.Now:u}";
}

When I rapidly request this from multiple tabs in the same browser, it takes 5 seconds between each tab. This is not the case when I use multiple browsers, it responds multiple times within a 5 second window.

When searching for a solution I kept stumbling upon ways to disable session state in ASP.NET, but nothing for Core.

As far as sessions are concerned, I am using the default API project template and I have done nothing to specifically enable/setup session state.

Is there a way to get rid of session state in ASP.NET Core? Or is there a better solution to enable concurrent requests?

3
  • 1
    Are you sure is a problem with ASP .net Core and not a problem by the browser? Browsers usually don't execute more than two request to the same domain simultaneously, and ASP .net Core by default has the session state disabled (you must enable it explicitly on the ConfigureServices function of the Startup class, docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/app-state)
    – Gusman
    Jun 13, 2017 at 16:55
  • I think you should test if this issue persists even if using a test tool like Fiddler. As said by @Gusman, browsers may behave unexpectedly. Jun 13, 2017 at 16:57
  • In Chrome it executes one at a time (with 5sec intervals), while in Postman it works cuncurrently. So I guess you are right, thank you!
    – Michal S
    Jun 13, 2017 at 17:04

2 Answers 2

4

You already have concurrent requests enabled in ASP.NET Core, no need to modify your code. Session in ASP.NET Core is non-locking. If multiple requests modify the session, the last action will win.

As-stated in the documentation:

Session state is non-locking. If two requests simultaneously attempt to modify the contents of a session, the last request overrides the first. Session is implemented as a coherent session, which means that all the contents are stored together. When two requests seek to modify different session values, the last request may override session changes made by the first.

3
  • Looking for documentation that backs this up.
    – Sam Rueby
    Apr 23, 2019 at 18:57
  • 1
    Session state is non-locking. If two requests simultaneously attempt to modify the contents of a session, the last request overrides the first. Session is implemented as a coherent session, which means that all the contents are stored together. When two requests seek to modify different session values, the last request may override session changes made by the first. Apr 25, 2019 at 15:25
1

If you set this attribute on your controller class

[SessionState(SessionStateBehavior.ReadOnly)]

It will set the session to not lock and therefore you will be able to make concurrent requests

You can read more about it here

1
  • This answer helped in .NET Framework.
    – Alieh S
    Mar 25 at 8:51

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