1

I wrote a function that returns whether a number input is a square or not

def is_square(n):
    if n<1:
        return False
    else:
        for i in range(int(n/2)+1):
            if (i*i)==n:
                return True
            else:
                return False

I am confident that this code works. But when I did the test cases, example:test.expect( is_square( 4)), it says that the value is not what was expected.

  • 1
    What is the value of is_square(1)? Or is_square(4)? Or is_square(n**2) for any n? – enedil Jun 13 '17 at 20:38
  • 1
    Looks like the first thing you'll try is if (1*1)==n. Unless n==1, your test will fail. – Jack Jun 13 '17 at 20:40
  • 1
    You should test your code with print statements before being confident that your code works. – Pedro von Hertwig Batista Jun 13 '17 at 20:41
  • 1
    Please add examples for input and output, and be more specific with your question. – Yonlif Jun 13 '17 at 20:41
  • If you need any other solutions to the perfect root problem you will find it here. – Yonlif Jun 13 '17 at 20:44
7

Your function doesn't actually work, as it will immediatley return False on the first non-square-root found. Instead you will want to modify your code to be:

def is_square(n):
    if n<1:
        return False
    else:
        for i in range(int(n/2)+1):
            if (i*i)==n:
                return True
        return False

such that it only returns false once all possible square roots have been checked. You may also want to look into math.sqrt() and float.is_integer(). Using these methods your function would become this:

from math import sqrt

def is_square(n):
    return sqrt(n).is_integer()

Keep in mind that this method will not work with very large numbers, but your method will be very slow with them, so you will have to choose which to use. Hope I helped!

  • Btw, seeing such algorithms makes my eyes bleed. – enedil Jun 13 '17 at 20:42
  • Lol that is true! Ah well, conform to the OP's method. – BluCode Jun 13 '17 at 20:43
  • Edited to add another (cleaner) method. – BluCode Jun 13 '17 at 20:47
  • math.sqrt is only approximate, like most floating-point operations. If you want to know whether an integer is a square, math.sqrt isn't an appropriate function to use. Here's a demo of your is_square failing. – user2357112 supports Monica Jun 13 '17 at 20:50
  • Edited to reflect this. – BluCode Jun 13 '17 at 20:52
5

To stick to integer-based algorithms, you might look at implementation of binary search for finding square root:

def is_square(n):
    if n < 0:
        return False
    if n == 0:
        return True
    x, y = 1, n
    while x + 1 < y:
        mid = (x+y)//2
        if mid**2 < n:
            x = mid
        else:
            y = mid
    return n == x**2 or n == (x+1)**2
  • What would be the run time of this solution in an average and worst case? – M. Abra Jun 14 '17 at 3:19
  • 1
    Worst and average case it's log n, in contrast with your solution, which is n/2. – enedil Jun 14 '17 at 10:59
4

The main idea of Python philosophy is to write simple code. To check if a number is an perfect square:

def is_square(n):
    return n**0.5 == int(n**0.5)

When power to a float you can find the root of a number.

  • 3
    This loses precision once your numbers get truly large: is_square(67108864**2 + 1) yields True. – TemporalWolf Jun 13 '17 at 21:57
  • @TemporalWolf Quote from [micsthepick] (stackoverflow.com/a/37197669/8156982) if you want to check ridiculously large cases, you should use a Babylonian algorithm approach, but this is fine for simple cases like finding the number of perfect squares below 1 million or another similar case with a brute-force algorithm. – Manu Jun 14 '17 at 15:57
  • There is nothing necessarily wrong about this approach, but I'm a fan of acknowledging limits up front. – TemporalWolf Jun 14 '17 at 16:51
0
def myfunct(num):
    for i in range(0,num):
        if i*i==num:
            return 'square'
    else:
        return 'not square'
  • 1
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Alexander Mar 10 '18 at 17:23
0

Easiest working solution, but not for large numbers.

def squaretest(num):
    sqlist=[]
    i=1
    while i**2 <= num:
        sqlist.append(i**2) 
        i+=1
    return num in sqlist
-1

To check if a number is a square, you could use code like this:

import math
number = 16
if math.sqrt(number).is_interger:
        print "Square"
else:
        print "Not square"

import math imports the math module.

if math.sqrt(number).is_interger: checks to see if the square root of number is a whole number. If so, it will print Square. Otherwise, it will print Not square.

  • 2
    math.sqrt(67108864**2 + 1).is_integer() yields True There is a limit to floating point accuracy. – TemporalWolf Jun 13 '17 at 22:00
-1

Since math.sqrt() returns a float, we can cast that to a string, split it from "." and check if the part on the right(the decimal) is 0.

import math
def is_square(n):
x= str(math.sqrt(n)).split(".")[1]  #getting the floating part as a string.
return True if(x=="0") else False

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