2

I'm using TypeScript Version 2.3.2. I experienced a transpile error with noImplicitAny option. I feel that the erro is something inconsistent.

Here is the code:

// Transpile with noImplicitAny

export type Callback1 = (a1: string) => void;
export type Callback2 = (a1: string, a2: string) => void;

export class Foo {
    setCb(cb: Callback1 | Callback2): void {
    }
}

let foo = new Foo();
foo.setCb((a1) => {});  // error Parameter 'a1' implicitly has an 'any' type. (parameter) a1: any
foo.setCb((a1: string) => {}); // no error
foo.setCb((a1, a2) => {});  // no error
foo.setCb((a1: string, a2: string) => {}); // no error

I think that if

foo.setCb((a1, a2) => {});  // no error

is accpeted,

foo.setCb((a1) => {});  // error Parameter 'a1' implicitly has an 'any' type. (parameter) a1: any

should be accepted similarly, or both should be error. That is inconsistent I mean.

I tried to read the specification.

https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/blob/master/doc/spec.md#34-union-types https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/blob/master/doc/spec.md#3117-type-inference

However, I couldn't find the reason about the behavior. I'm not sure I understand the spec correctly.

Any ideas?

0

The problem is that the TypeScript compiler can't decide if your callback is of type Callback1 or Callback2 (because you can always omit parameters when defining your function).

The problem becomes more noticeable when defining the callbacks the following way:

export type Callback1 = (a: string) => void;
export type Callback2 = (a: number) => void;

In that case it is clear that the compiler can't infere the callback signature. If TypeScript's behavior in your case is inconsistent is therefore a matter of opinion.

However, why do you even provide two different callback signatures? The second one on its own would be enough, since, as I said, the parameters could always be omitted.

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