-2

What is the difference between following code..

int i=0;
List<CustomerReqRespEntity> customerReqRespEntities=new ArrayList<>();
for(int x=0;x<4;x++){
   CustomerReqRespEntity customerReqRespEntity=new CustomerReqRespEntity();
   customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(++);
   customerReqRespEntities.add(customerReqRespEntity);
}

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

int i=0;
List<CustomerReqRespEntity> customerReqRespEntities=new ArrayList<>();
CustomerReqRespEntity customerReqRespEntity=new CustomerReqRespEntity();
customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(i++);
customerReqRespEntities.add(customerReqRespEntity);

CustomerReqRespEntity customerReqRespEntity=new CustomerReqRespEntity();
customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(i++);
customerReqRespEntities.add(customerReqRespEntity);

CustomerReqRespEntity customerReqRespEntity=new CustomerReqRespEntity();
customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(i++);
customerReqRespEntities.add(customerReqRespEntity);

CustomerReqRespEntity customerReqRespEntity=new CustomerReqRespEntity();
customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(i++);
customerReqRespEntities.add(customerReqRespEntity);
10
  • 2
    One uses a loop, the other one doesn't? – Jesper Bangsholt Jun 14 '17 at 5:25
  • 3
    No one, the upper one is missing an x and is more DRY...( e.g. what happens if you want 1000 of them? ( just always use loops for that)) – Jonas Wilms Jun 14 '17 at 5:25
  • 2
    The first one wouldn't either because of the statement customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(++); – Harmlezz Jun 14 '17 at 5:26
  • As you mentioned in your question, the first one uses for loop and the second one doesn't. The effect of both them is practically the same. – deepakchethan Jun 14 '17 at 5:26
  • I think it should be customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(x++); instead of customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(++); at the 5th line of first code portion – Arun Sudhakaran Jun 14 '17 at 5:27
5

No difference as I see it. However writing using loop will provide better opportunities for maintenance, because in case of error or any other situation you will only need to modify a single block, instead of modifying 4. Also I think you forget to add i inside the parenthesis in customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(++); > customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(i++);
What is more, you might not need the i variable, if you use it only inside the loop, instead you can use your iterator x > customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(x);

6
  • 1
    Not only that, creating a few thousand objs with method2 is quite funny ;) – Jonas Wilms Jun 14 '17 at 5:27
  • 1
    @Jonasw it is, I once was creating 10+ code lines instead of using 3 line for loop. Want to slap myself for that... – Hatik Jun 14 '17 at 5:30
  • @Jonasw don't see your point. The loop would create the same amount of objects... – Timothy Truckle Jun 14 '17 at 5:30
  • @TimothyTruckle, Yea that's true, but it's more clean code and reusable. – Nirav Madariya Jun 14 '17 at 5:31
  • @timothy truckle but maintaining the creation of 1000 objs with method2 will need some copy + pastes and will create a much bigger jar... Computers were invented to redo tasks many times so use the loops! – Jonas Wilms Jun 14 '17 at 5:33
1

Scope matters @Siddappa Walake. In the first portion your instances are created inside the for loop, which makes them local to that loop, and thus won't be accessible outside the loop. In the second portion it is not created in the loop, I'm guessing they are created inside a method, if that's the case then they are available through out the method and can be passed to another method as an argument.

0
0

I don't think you'll be able to compile the second one as you are using a variable name more than once.

The loop in your first code has its own scope, meaning all variables are only valid in each iteration and are discarded when the end of the loop is hit.

1
  • Considering following snippet, last update on customerReqRespEntity will riflect in list where as if same customerReqRespEntity is created in loop it will retain corresponding updates. int i=0; List<CustomerReqRespEntity> customerReqRespEntities=new ArrayList<>(); CustomerReqRespEntity customerReqRespEntity=new CustomerReqRespEntity(); for(int x=0;x<4;x++){ customerReqRespEntity.setEntryId(i++); customerReqRespEntities.add(customerReqRespEntity); } – Siddappa Walake Jun 14 '17 at 5:40
0

You should use methods or loops whenever you can. They shorten code, remove redundancy, and make debugging easier. Despite your small error(setEntryId(++)), they both produce the same effect.

Using the loop is especially a better practice because if you wanted to make 100 objects, using a loop would be a lot less work; the difference between 5 lines and 350 lines(guesstimate) is quite a gap. Therefore your first option is better, but it does not make a difference when you run it.

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