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Is there an effective way of using git to manage two branches that are based on the same code logic but support different API's? Here is a concrete example: Suppose I have a repo with one Python 2 file called abc.py. In commit A on branch py2, the file contents are:

print 'A'

Now I branch off of A with a new py3 branch and make commit A3 with this content:

print('A')

Back on the py2 branch, someone makes a new commit B with content

print 'A'
print 'B'

On py3, I merge py2 to get the B update and get this merge conflict:

<<<<<<< HEAD
print('A')
=======
print 'A'
print 'B'
>>>>>>> 9d898

So the conflict over print 'A' is re-raised. I resolve this to

print('A')
print('B')

Now in py2 there is commit C with

print 'A'
print 'B'
print 'C'

and merging this into py3 gives the conflict

<<<<<<< HEAD
print('A')
print('B')
=======
print 'A'
print 'B'
print 'C'
>>>>>>> 2c5a5

So again all of the changes are re-raised as a merge conflict.

It seems like with this approach of frequently merging from py2 to py3 each merge will be more complicated and painful than the previous one. Is there a way to use git to maintain two branches like this where the previous merge history can be better incorporated? If not, I guess I am better off doing as few big "catch up" merges as possible, rather than doing frequent small merges which is usually the best approach.

Background: I am trying to port a project from Python 2 to Python 3. If I could do this instantaneously, I would do so and drop Python 2 support, but I can't do it instantly so I have to allow development on the Python 2 branch while the Python 3 port is done in another branch. I know that many large projects transitioned by going through a phase of supporting 2 and 3 simultaneously with one code base. Since I don't need to support Python 2 once Python 3 works, I thought the porting process would be simpler if I just did a one-way port, but the process of porting updates from Python 2 seems more difficult than I thought at first.

Disclaimer: I know my example is trivial and could be worked around by using the printing function from __future__ in Python 2, but there is not such an easy workaround for everything. Also, I think this question is more broadly applicable to other cases than just Python 2/3.

0

As disappointing as it may be to hear, I think that branches are probably not the right tool for the job. These branches are often called "long running branches" and generally never pan out to be as useful in practice as they initially seem to in theory.

I would suggest that a better tool is a text pre-processor like gpp, m4, or (if it were a c/c++ project) cpp.

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