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Hi I am trying to send and receive some data between client/server application.

Class

[Serializable]
public class ScanSessie
{
    public string UserId { get; set; }
    public int TotalScanned { get; set; }
    public string Status { get; set; }
    public string DeviceId { get; set; }
}

Serializer and Deserializer extension methods:

public static class SerializerDeserializerExtensions
{
    public static byte[] Serializer(this object _object)
    {
        byte[] bytes;
        using (var _MemoryStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            IFormatter _BinaryFormatter = new BinaryFormatter();
            _BinaryFormatter.Serialize(_MemoryStream, _object);
            bytes = _MemoryStream.ToArray();
        }
        return bytes;
    }

    public static T Deserializer<T>(this byte[] _byteArray)
    {
        T ReturnValue;

        using (var _MemoryStream = new MemoryStream(_byteArray))
        {
            IFormatter _BinaryFormatter = new BinaryFormatter();
            ReturnValue = (T)_BinaryFormatter.Deserialize(_MemoryStream);
        }
        return ReturnValue;
    }
}

The example data I am trying to send and deserialize it is:

    List<ScanSessie> scannerCl = new List<ScanSessie>();
    scannerCl.Add(new ScanSessie { DeviceId = "0x00456321", UserId = "123456", Status = "scannen ...", TotalScanned = 0 });
    scannerCl.Add(new ScanSessie { DeviceId = "0x00456321", UserId = "123456", Status = "scannen ...", TotalScanned = 0 });
    scannerCl.Add(new ScanSessie { DeviceId = "0x00456321", UserId = "123456", Status = "scannen ...", TotalScanned = 0 });
    scannerCl.Add(new ScanSessie { DeviceId = "0x00456321", UserId = "123456", Status = "scannen ...", TotalScanned = 0 });
    scannerCl.Add(new ScanSessie { DeviceId = "0x00456321", UserId = "123456", Status = "scannen ...", TotalScanned = 0 });
    scannerCl.Add(new ScanSessie { DeviceId = "0x00456321", UserId = "123456", Status = "scannen ...", TotalScanned = 0 });

Sending with the following code:

        NetworkStream broadcastStream = statusSocket.GetStream();

        Byte[] broadcastBytes = SerializerDeserializerExtensions.Serializer(scannerCl);

        broadcastStream.Write(broadcastBytes, 0, broadcastBytes.Length);
        broadcastStream.Flush();

Receiving stream code. ignore the n.DataAvailable loop. I am sending for test purposes very small packets way below the buffer that is transfered in one part.

 using (TcpClient client = new TcpClient())
                {
                    await client.ConnectAsync("10.184.32.39", 8888);

                    ConnectionEstabilished?.Invoke();

                    byte[] message = new byte[1024 * 8];
                    int bytesRead;

                    using (NetworkStream n = client.GetStream())
                    {
                        while (true)
                        {
                            bytesRead = 0;

                            try
                            {
                                if(n.CanRead)
                                {
                                    do
                                    {
                                        bytesRead = await n.ReadAsync(message, 0, message.Length);
                                    }
                                    while (n.DataAvailable);
                                }
                                //bytesRead = await n.ReadAsync(message, 0, 4096);
                                //bytesRead = await n.ReadAsync(message, 0, message.Length);
                            }
                            catch (Exception ex)
                            {
                                // some error hapens here catch it          
                                Debug.WriteLine("DashboardClientConnect " + ex.Message + "\n" + ex.InnerException);
                                break;
                            }
                         }

The receiving code will fire an event with the data as byte[] defined as message. On my processing event I try to deserialize it with:

private void Sc_NewDataReceived(byte[] scanner)
{
    try
    {
        var result = scanner.Deserializer<List<ScanSessie>>();
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(ex.InnerException);
    }
}

On the deserialize step it will throw an exception (Exception thrown: 'System.Runtime.Serialization.SerializationException' in mscorlib.dll) Innerexception is null.

When I use the extension methods without sending it over network with some example data the deserializing works flawless.

I've also tried to play around with the receiving buffer sizes. That doesn't seems to help also. The example data size is below 1024*8.

If the send data length is 600 bytes for example. Does the receiving end buffer also needs to be the same size? Normally that should be a problem because it reads in chunks.

After 2 days I give up. Any help would be appreciated. I tried to make the question informative by placing the functioning code snippets.

  • If your message size is less than buffer size (1024*8) - the rest of your buffer is filled with zeroes, which of course prevent correct deserialization. Not to mention each read overwrites part of the buffer (in while DataAvailable loop). – Evk Jun 15 '17 at 7:33
  • Trying to use NetworkStream.Length is not supported so you need to define a fixed buffer size. Big or small. To test it i checked the size of my sample data it was 606 bytes. I've adjusted the receiving buffer also to 606 bytes the same exception occurs. The while loop is indeed overwriting it. It's a sample code. The send data is way below the buffer size so it won't loop it :) – Shift Jun 15 '17 at 7:40
  • Instead of serializing via a MemoryStream, you could provide the NetworkStream to the BinaryFormatter directly. But if you do want to process the data manually, keep in mind that the Read operations return the number of bytes actually read, and it may receive the data in chunks smaller than the data sent. Receiving 0 bytes indicates the other side has closed its sending channel. – C.Evenhuis Jun 15 '17 at 7:46
  • @C.Evenhuis I understand the buffer and chunk issue. In this example it's not the case. The example data is 606 bytes. It's transferring in one piece without chunks. If the data would be big than it can occur. – Shift Jun 15 '17 at 7:50
  • @Shift In an earlier comment you said the while loop is overwriting your data, I'm pretty sure you're not receiving the data in one chunk, because the loop wouldn't overwrite any data if there's no data to read from the stream. – C.Evenhuis Jun 15 '17 at 7:59
2

This code has several problems:

 do
 {
     bytesRead = await n.ReadAsync(message, 0, message.Length);
 }
 while (n.DataAvailable);

First, sender might send message bytes in chunks. First you will read one chunk, then you will read another chunk overwriting first one in buffer (because you use the same buffer for all reads, and you always write to index 0).

Also, you have no idea when message was really received completely. Sender might send one chunk, then there is a delay for whatever reason, at this point your while (n.DataAvailable) loop exists and you are trying to deserialize incomplete message.

On the top of it - when you were lucky to receive full message - the rest of the buffer (assuming message length is smaller that buffer size) is filled with zeroes which anyway prevents successful deserialization.

Also - it's not a good idea to use BinaryFormatter to serialize objects over the network. Instead use something like protobuf.

To fix your networking code - first send length of your serialized message. If you have different message types - also send message type. After sending length (and type if necessary) - send message itself:

NetworkStream broadcastStream = statusSocket.GetStream();
Byte[] broadcastBytes = SerializerDeserializerExtensions.Serializer(scannerCl);
var lengthBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(broadcastBytes.Length);
if (!BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
     Array.Reverse(lengthBytes);
broadcastStream.Write(lengthBytes, 0, lengthBytes.Length);
broadcastStream.Write(broadcastBytes, 0, broadcastBytes.Length);
broadcastStream.Flush();

Then on receiving side:

byte[] lengthBuffer = new byte[sizeof(int)];
var bytesRead = await n.ReadAsync(lengthBuffer, 0, lengthBuffer.Length);
// check if bytesRead equals buffer size
if (!BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
    Array.Reverse(lengthBuffer);
var length = BitConverter.ToInt32(lengthBuffer, 0);
// check if length is not too big, otherwise you will crash process with out of memory
var messageBuffer = new byte[length];
bytesRead = await n.ReadAsync(messageBuffer, 0, messageBuffer.Length);
// check if bytesRead equals buffer size
// now you can deserialize

Note that this code is untested, so take care.

  • I got that. The data is very small to cause buffer issue. I am sending small packet of 606 bytes. I will take care of that piece later when deserializing works. – Shift Jun 15 '17 at 7:54
  • But there are other problems listed there, such as buffer filled with zeroes, because you don't know buffer size. – Evk Jun 15 '17 at 7:55
  • As I mentioned above with receiving buffer set to 606 (based on what I am sending) without zeros it still won't deserialize it. – Shift Jun 15 '17 at 7:58
  • 1
    Then just compare what you receive with what you send, and what you send with what you can successfully deserialize, we cannot magically find where exactly your code goes wrong in this regard. But instead of trying to fix poor code - better improve it first, maybe it will resolve your problem right away. – Evk Jun 15 '17 at 8:58
1

I suggest to use WCF, .NET Remoting or something comparable. They are designed for exactly that purpose.

If you write your own transmission channel, normally you have to embedd the serialized data in a data communication protocol. Typically this contains a message length and other information about the transmitted data. This is required, e.g. to let the receiver know the data/message size and data type. On the receiver side, normally you have no idea about, how many bytes have to be received and what they are.

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