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I have a date stored in the DB in string format ddMMyyyy and hh:mm and the TimeZone. I want to create an Instant based on that information, but I don't know how to do it.

something like

LocalDateTime dateTime = LocalDateTime.of(2017, Month.JUNE, 1, 13, 39);
Instant instant = dateTime.toInstant(TimeZone.getTimeZone("ECT"));
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    Do you mean ZonedDateTime.ofInstant(instant, TimeZone.getDefault()) ? Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 13:49
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    @soorapadman That would return a ZonedDateTime. OP wants an Instant. Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 13:50
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    Never use the 3-4 character abbreviations for time zones. Those are not real time zones, not standardized, and not even unique! Use true time zone names in the format continent/region such as Europe/London, Europe/Paris, Asia/Kolkata, Pacific/Auckland. If by “ECT” you meant Ecuador Time, use ZoneId.of( "America/Guayaquil" ). If you meant central Europe, use an appropriate Europe/… zone name. Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 16:10
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    This Question is not a duplicate of that linked Question. This Question has nothing to do directly with a count of milliseconds. Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 16:16
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    “I have a date stored in the DB in string format ddMMyyyy and hh:mm and the TimeZone.” No, you don't, not if you used a date-time data type in defining your DB column such as TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE (as you should). Date-time columns have no "format" as they are not string/text. Retrieve date-time values as date-time objects rather than as Strings. Instant instant = myResultSet.getObject( … , Instant.class ) ; Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 16:21

3 Answers 3

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You can first create a ZonedDateTime with that time zone, and then call toInstant:

LocalDateTime dateTime = LocalDateTime.of(2017, Month.JUNE, 15, 13, 39);
Instant instant = dateTime.atZone(ZoneId.of("Europe/Paris")).toInstant();
System.out.println(instant); // 2017-06-15T11:39:00Z

I also switched to using the full time zone name (per Basil's advice), since it is less ambiguous.

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    Almost a perfect Answer, but you should not be encouraging the use of the 3-4 letter pseudo-time-zone codes. Instead use true time zone names in continent/region format. I'm guessing the author meant Ecuador Time for “ECT”. ZoneId.of( "America/Guayaquil" ) ) Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 16:04
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    @BasilBourque "ECT" is actually European Central Time (Europe/Paris), so I can see why using the full name would be better ;) Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 16:19
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    I have only seen “CET” as central European time. But that's the point, these 3-4 letter codes are a nightmare of ambiguity, and should be avoided like the Plague. Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 16:26
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    @Line A date is ambiguous. A few minutes after midnight in Paris France is a new day, while still “yesterday” in Montréal Québec. If you intended the date to be in UTC, use OffsetDateTime to determine a moment: OffsetDateTime.of( LocalDate.of( 2018 , 1 , 23 ) , LocalTime.MIN , ZoneOffset.UTC ) Commented Oct 10, 2018 at 12:38
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    Because 2-4 letter abbreviations (ET, PST, EST, CST, IST, and so on) are not true time zones, not standardized, and are not unique. Ex: IST = Iceland Standard Time, Ireland Standard Time, India Standard Time, and so on. See Wikipedia for list of standard time zone names in Continent/Regionformat. Commented Oct 10, 2018 at 14:53
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Forget the old TimeZone class. Use ZoneId, because it's properly thread-safe and you can just use a final static field to store the zone.

LocalDateTime dateTime = LocalDateTime.of(2017, Month.JUNE, 1, 13, 39);
ZonedDateTime.of(dateTime, ZoneId.of("ECT")).toInstant();
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I think the following code should work:

LocalDateTime time = LocalDateTime.of(2017, Month.JUNE, 15, 13, 39);
ZonedDateTime.of(time, TimeZone.getTimeZone("ZONE").toZoneId()).toInstant();

You just have to replace "ZONE" with the timezone you need.

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    No, TimeZone is the legacy class, now supplanted by ZoneId and ZoneOffset. Avoid the legacy date-time classes. And certainly do not mix the legacy classes with java.time classes. Please correct or delete your Answer. Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 15:54

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