I'm working through 'Automate the Boring Stuff with Python'. I can't figure out how to remove the final output comma from the program below. The goal is to keep prompting the user to input values, which are then printed out in a list, with "and" inserted before the end. The output should look something like this:

apples, bananas, tofu, and cats

Mine looks like this:

apples, bananas, tofu, and cats,

That last comma is driving me NUTS.

def lister():
    listed = []
    while True:
        print('type what you want to be listed or type nothing to exit')
        inputted = input()
        if inputted == '':
            break
        else:
            listed.append(inputted+',')
    listed.insert(-1, 'and')
    for i in listed:
        print(i, end=' ')
lister()
up vote 42 down vote accepted

You can avoid adding commas to each string in the list by deferring the formatting to print time. Join all the items excluding the last on ', ', then use formatting to insert the joined string with the last item conjuncted by and:

listed.append(inputed)
...
print('{}, and {}'.format(', '.join(listed[:-1]), listed[-1]))

Demo:

>>> listed = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
>>> print('{}, and {}'.format(', '.join(listed[:-1]), listed[-1]))
a, b, c, and d
  • 4
    Improvement suggestion: str.format is no longer recommended, and 3.6 added support for a new inline formatting syntax that makes the code even more readable if you want to use a formatting approach: f"{', '.join(listed[:-1])}, and {listed[-1]}". However, I would say no formatting at all is the most readable: ', '.join(listed[:-1]) + ", and" + listed[-1] – gntskn Jun 16 '17 at 3:24
  • 1
    @gntskn Is str.format really "no longer recommended"? I would argue that the format string itself is easier to read as is, could be extracted to a fmt variable, etc. I'm sure there are use cases for f"..." strings, especially when just pasting local variables into a format string, but to say that str.format is "no longer recommended" at all seems a bit overzealous. – Zac Crites Jun 16 '17 at 14:24
  • @ZacCrites You know what, you're right; I was thinking of the % operator. This is what I get for posting from my phone right before midnight :p – gntskn Jun 16 '17 at 15:26
  • 1
    @gntskn Also note that f-strings are not available in Python versions < 3.6 – Moses Koledoye Jun 17 '17 at 18:02

The accepted answer is good, but it might be better to move this functionality into a separate function that takes a list, and also handle the edge cases of 0, 1, or 2 items in the list:

def oxfordcomma(listed):
    if len(listed) == 0:
        return ''
    if len(listed) == 1:
        return listed[0]
    if len(listed) == 2:
        return listed[0] + ' and ' + listed[1]
    return ', '.join(listed[:-1]) + ', and ' + listed[-1]

Test cases:

>>> oxfordcomma([])
''
>>> oxfordcomma(['apples'])
'apples'
>>> oxfordcomma(['apples', 'pears'])
'apples and pears'
>>> oxfordcomma(['apples', 'pears', 'grapes'])
'apples, pears, and grapes'
  • Note: corrected some mistakes in the earlier version and adopted a suggestion from @gntskn on the accepted answer. – David Conrad Jun 16 '17 at 5:30
  • I think that this function is unnecessarily complicated or lengthy for the task at hand – Admin_Who Jul 2 '17 at 1:52

Modifying your code a little bit...

def lister():
    listed = []
    while True:
        print('type what you want to be listed or type nothing to exit')
        inputted = input()
        if inputted == '':
            break
        else:
            listed.append(inputted) # removed the comma here

    print(', '.join(listed[:-2]) + ' and ' + listed[-1])  #using the join operator, and appending and xxx at the end
lister()
  • You need more: OP has already inserted commas into the individual strings. – Prune Jun 15 '17 at 18:34
  • This will add a comma behind the and. – Jonas Schäfer Jun 15 '17 at 18:36
listed[-1] = listed[-1][:-1]

This will truncate the final character of the final string in listed.

Lots of ways to do it, but how about this?

# listed[-1] is the last element of the list
# rstrip removes matching characters from the end of the string
listed[-1] = listed[-1].rstrip(',')
listed.insert(-1, 'and')
for i in listed:
    print(i, end=' ')

You'll still be printing a space at the end of the line, but I guess you won't see it and thus won't care. :-)

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