1

I've been looking into a particularly nasty bug - wanted to find out from the community if this is just me being stupid (entirely possible) or is there something odd happening.

So, to replicate the problem, you need GCC 5.3 and boost 1.60.

First pyt.cpp -> which compiles to libpyt.so

/*
 * This inclusion should be put at the beginning.  It will include <Python.h>.
 */
#include <boost/python.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>

/*
 * This is the C++ function we write and want to expose to Python.
 */
const std::string hello1(const std::string& name) {
  std::ostringstream str;
  str << "Hello: " << name << ", here is a number: " << 10 << std::endl;
  return str.str();
}

/*
 * This is a macro Boost.Python provides to signify a Python extension module.
 */
BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(libpyt) {
    // An established convention for using boost.python.
     using namespace boost::python;

    // Expose the function hello2().
    def("hello1", hello1);
}

Second pyto.cpp -> which compiles to libpyto.so

/*
 * This inclusion should be put at the beginning.  It will include <Python.h>.
 */
#include <boost/python.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>

/*
 * This is the C++ function we write and want to expose to Python.
 */
const std::string hello2(const std::string& name) {
  std::ostringstream str;
  str << "Hello: " << name << ", here is a number: " << 10 << std::endl;
  return str.str();
}

/*
 * This is a macro Boost.Python provides to signify a Python extension module.
 */
BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(libpyto) {
    // An established convention for using boost.python.
     using namespace boost::python;

    // Expose the function hello2().
    def("hello2", hello2);
}

I compiled using the following:

/usr/local/gcc5_3_0/bin/g++ -std=c++14 pyt.cpp -fPIC -shared -o libpyt.so -I /usr/local/boost1_60_0_gcc5_3_0/include/ -I /usr/include/python2.7/ -L /usr/local/boost1_60_0_gcc5_3_0/lib64/ -Wl,-Bstatic -l boost_python.pic -Wl,-Bdynamic -lpthread -lpython2.7 -ldl -lrt -static-libstdc++ -static-libgcc

/usr/local/gcc5_3_0/bin/g++ -std=c++14 pyto.cpp -fPIC -shared -o libpyto.so -I /usr/local/boost1_60_0_gcc5_3_0/include/ -I /usr/include/python2.7/ -L /usr/local/boost1_60_0_gcc5_3_0/lib64/ -Wl,-Bstatic -l boost_python.pic -Wl,-Bdynamic -lpthread -lpython2.7 -ldl -lrt -static-libstdc++ -static-libgcc

(ignore the .pic extension for the boost library, it's just a static library with objects that were compiled with -fPIC - using this same compiler.)

Now, I simply import them into python, and call the hello1/2 functions:

bash-4.2$ python
Python 2.7.5 (default, Sep 15 2016, 22:37:39) 
[GCC 4.8.5 20150623 (Red Hat 4.8.5-4)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import libpyt
>>> import libpyto
>>> libpyto.hello2("hello");
'Hello: hello, here is a number: 10\n'
>>> libpyt.hello1("hello");
'Hello: hello, here is a number: '  <<<!!! What???
>>> 
bash-4.2$ python
Python 2.7.5 (default, Sep 15 2016, 22:37:39) 
[GCC 4.8.5 20150623 (Red Hat 4.8.5-4)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import libpyto
>>> import libpyt
>>> libpyt.hello1("Hello")
'Hello: Hello, here is a number: 10\n'
>>> libpyto.hello2("Hello") 
'Hello: Hello, here is a number: '  <<<!!! What???

As you can see, irrespective of the order of import, the second hello function fails to generate the output correctly. So my question is, why is the streaming out of the integer value failing for the second call?

EDIT: One more data point, enabling exceptions on the streams, results in a std::bad_cast being thrown on the second call.

18
  • How specifically is the output wrong? It's not clear or obvious
    – MrJLP
    Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 21:44
  • @MrJLP, it's missing the ` 10\n` . This is how I know the stream is some how corrupted, it's not streaming out the integer 10.
    – Nim
    Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 21:45
  • I'm curious what happens if you assign int val = 10 and then print out val if the problem still happens. Might be a boost bug. BTW I'd recommend stating clearly the actual problem at the top of your question.
    – MrJLP
    Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 21:49
  • @MrJLP, it shouldn't make any difference (and it doesn't btw,) as I said, for the two compilers, I'm actually using two different versions of boost. I'd imagine such an issue would have been caught by now - if it was there..
    – Nim
    Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 21:53
  • 1
    Mixing libraries with ABI differences and/or ODR violations is undefined behaviour
    – sehe
    Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 22:20

2 Answers 2

1

You cannot mix multiple copies of Boost.Python in the same process. If you do, you get two type registries, and only one will be found and used.

Solution: use Boost.Python as a shared library, shared between your two Python module shared objects.

1
  • Unfortunately this is not the issue.
    – Nim
    Commented Jun 16, 2017 at 7:39
1

Okay - so the problem is simple to resolve in the end. The issue stems from -static-libstdc++ -static-libgcc. It appears that you cannot import multiple modules into python which have libstdc++ and libgcc statically linked.

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