5

I have:

sprintf("%02X" % 13)

Which outputs:

=>"OD"

I want my output to be:

=>"%0D"

I've tried:

sprintf("\%%02X" % 13)

but I get an error warning: too many arguments for format string. The same goes for:

sprintf("%%02X" %  13)

Is it possible to add a leading % in sprintf alone?

  • Have you read the documentation of Kernel#sprintf? It is possible, of course, and it is explained there how. – axiac Jun 16 '17 at 9:57
  • Not sure where that warning comes from, I get ArgumentError: too few arguments. – Stefan Jun 16 '17 at 9:59
  • 1
    It would be helpful if you could explain in detail, what precisely is unclear to you in the documentation. That way, the Ruby developers have a chance to improve the documentation for future readers. Personally, I find "% | A percent sign itself will be displayed. No argument taken." pretty clear, but obviously you don't. It is likely that others see it the same as you, and so you can help them by helping the Ruby developers improve the documentation. – Jörg W Mittag Jun 16 '17 at 10:19
11

A literal % has to be escaped as %%:

sprintf('%%') #=> "%"

Furthermore, you should either use sprintf or %, not both:

sprintf('%%%02X', 13)  #=> "%0D"
#               ^
#          comma here

'%%%02X' % 13          #=> "%0D"
#        ^
# percent sign here

If these are too many percent signs, you can separate the string literal to make it more obvious:

sprintf('%%' '%02X', 13)
#=> "%0D"

In Ruby, 'foo' 'bar' is equivalent to 'foobar', i.e. adjacent string literals are automatically concatenated by the interpreter.

  • 1
    The question is trivial but this little insight was fun "In Ruby, 'foo' 'bar' is equivalent to 'foobar', i.e. adjacent string literals are automatically concatenated by the interpreter." I was completely unaware of that – engineersmnky Jun 16 '17 at 15:14
4
sprintf('%%%02X', 13)
  # => "%0D"

From the ruby docs:

Field: % | Other Format: A percent sign itself will be displayed. No argument taken.

i.e. You must escape the % character with a double %%; much like you much escape a single \ with \\ in regular strings.

1

Another possibility is to use Integer#to_s :

"%" + 13.to_s(16).rjust(2, '0').upcase
#=> "%0D"

And since % has a higher precedence than +, you could also write :

"%" + "%02X" % 13
#=> "%0D"

which is equivalent to

"%" + ("%02X" % 13)
#=> "%0D"
  • 1
    13.to_s(16).rjust(2, '0').upcase.prepend('%') is even longer ;-) – Stefan Jun 16 '17 at 13:38

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