3

Let's say I have a method that provides access to an API client in the scope of a user and the API client will automatically update the users OAuth tokens when they expire.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  def api
    ApiClient.new access_token: oauth_access_token,
                  refresh_token: oauth_refresh_token,
                  on_oauth_refresh: -> (tokens) {
                    # This proc will be called by the API client when an 
                    # OAuth refresh occurs
                    update_attributes({
                      oauth_access_token: tokens[:access_token],
                      oauth_refresh_token: tokens[:refresh_token]
                     })
                   }
  end

end

If I consume this API within a Rails transaction and a refresh occurs and then an error occurs - I can't persist the new OAuth tokens (because the proc above is also treated as part of the transaction):

u = User.first

User.transaction { 
  local_info = Info.create!

  # My tokens are expired so the client automatically
  # refreshes them and calls the proc that updates them locally.
  external_info = u.api.get_external_info(local_info.id)

  # Now when I try to locally save the info returned by the API an exception
  # occurs (for example due to validation). This rolls back the entire 
  # transaction (including the update of the user's new tokens.)
  local_info.info = external_info 
  local_info.save!
}

I'm simplifying the example but basically the consuming of the API and the persistence of data returned by the API need to happen within a transaction. How can I ensure the update to the user's tokens gets committed even if the parent transaction fails.

  • Just put it outside the transaction, no? – jvillian Jun 16 '17 at 20:13
  • Unfortunately, no. The "nested transaction" is called by an API client that I don't have control over. Imagine that inside my transaction, I need to consume an API and my OAuth token expires. The API client refreshes my tokens but can't persist them because the transaction fails downstream. – user1032752 Jun 16 '17 at 20:16
  • 1
    Perhaps you need Autonomous Transactions. This article may help you grasp the concept and apply it to your ruby scenario. – cachique Jun 16 '17 at 20:33
  • Thanks for the link. Do you know of any Ruby/Rails abstraction layers that can help with this? I'd rather avoid writing stored procedures. – user1032752 Jun 17 '17 at 17:17
  • No. Ruby is not in my tool set. – cachique Jun 22 '17 at 18:41
2
+50

Have you tried opening a new db connection inside new thread, and in this thread execute the update

u = User.first

User.transaction { 
   local_info = Info.create!

   # My tokens are expired so the client automatically
   # refreshes them and calls the proc that updates them locally.
   external_info = u.api.get_external_info(local_info.id)

   # Now when I try to locally save the info returned by the API an exception
   # occurs (for example due to validation). This rolls back the entire 
   # transaction (including the update of the user's new tokens.)
   local_info.info = external_info 
   local_info.save!

   # Now open new thread
   # In the new thread open new db connection, separate from the one already opened
   # In the new connection execute update only for the tokens
   # Close new connection and new thread
   Thread.new do
      ActiveRecord::Base.connection_pool.with_connection do |connection|
         connection.execute("Your SQL statement that will update the user tokens")        
      end
   end.join
}

I hope this helps

  • 1
    Works great - thanks a lot! In fact, you can just wrap the transaction in the new Thread and it works. – user1032752 Jun 24 '17 at 20:39
0

This discussion from a previous question might help you. It looks like you can set a requires_new: true flag and essentially mark the child transaction as a sub transaction.

User.transaction { 
  User.transaction(requires_new: true) { 
    u.update_attribute(:name, 'test') 
  }; 

  u.update_attribute(:name, 'test2'); 

  raise 'boom' 
}
  • Thanks for your comment. I did try this but it looks like it offers the opposite of what I need. From what I understand, this will commit the second update if the nested transaction experiences an exception not the other way around. – user1032752 Jun 17 '17 at 17:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.