2

I am trying to run a simple autoencoder, all the training input is the same. The training data features are equal to 3, and the hidden layer has 3 nodes in it. I train the autoencoder with that input, then I try to predict it (encode/decode) again (so if the autoencoder passes everything as is without any changes it should work)

Anyway, that's not the case, and I am a sturggling a bit to understand why. I am not sure if it's something wrong in my code, or in my understanding of the autoencdoer implementation. Here is the code for reference.

P.S. I played around with the number of epoches, number of examples in the training set, the batch size, made the training data values between 0-1, and kept track of the loss value, but that didn't help either.

`

from keras.layers import Input, Dense
from keras.models import Model
import numpy as np 
# this is the size of our encoded representations
encoding_dim = 3

x_train=np.array([[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3]])
in= Input(shape=(3,))
encoded = Dense(encoding_dim, activation='relu')(in)
decoded = Dense(3, activation='sigmoid')(encoded)

# this model maps an input to its reconstruction
autoencoder = Model(in, decoded)
autoencoder.compile(optimizer='adadelta', loss='mse')

autoencoder.fit(x_train, x_train,
                epochs=100,
                batch_size=4)
autoencoder.predict(x_train)

`

The output I get should be the same as the input (or at least close) but I get this instead)

`Out[180]: 
array([[ 0.80265796,  0.89038897,  0.9100889 ],
       [ 0.80265796,  0.89038897,  0.9100889 ],
       [ 0.80265796,  0.89038897,  0.9100889 ],
       ..., 
       [ 0.80265796,  0.89038897,  0.9100889 ],
       [ 0.80265796,  0.89038897,  0.9100889 ],
       [ 0.80265796,  0.89038897,  0.9100889 ]], dtype=float32)`

Any help would be appreciated, most likely I understood something wrong so hopefully this question is not that hard to answer.

4 Answers 4

8

The error is here decoded = Dense(3, activation='sigmoid')(encoded).

You shouldn't use sigmoid activation, because it will limit the output in range (0, 1), replace the sigmoid with linear or just remove it, and you can add more epochs, e.g. train 1000 epochs. In this setting, I get what you need

[[ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]
 [ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]
 [ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]
 [ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]
 [ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]
 [ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]
 [ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]
 [ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]
 [ 0.98220336  1.98066235  2.98398876]]

In addition, you should replace the input in with another name, as it is a keyword in Python :-).

2

After apply @danche suggestion following is the updated code and results, I got the results after increasing the epocs = 10000

from keras.layers import Input, Dense
from keras.models import Model
import numpy as np
# this is the size of our encoded representations
encoding_dim = 3

x_train=np.array([[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3]])
input = Input(shape=(3,))
encoded = Dense(encoding_dim, activation='relu')(input)
decoded = Dense(3, activation='linear')(encoded)

# this model maps an input to its reconstruction
autoencoder = Model(input, decoded)
autoencoder.compile(optimizer='adadelta', loss='mse')

autoencoder.fit(x_train, x_train,epochs=10000,batch_size=4)
print(autoencoder.predict(x_train))



Epoch 10000/10000
8/8 [==============================] - 0s - loss: 2.4463e-04     
[[ 0.99124289  1.98534203  2.97887278]
 [ 0.99124289  1.98534203  2.97887278]
 [ 0.99124289  1.98534203  2.97887278]
 [ 0.99124289  1.98534203  2.97887278]
 [ 0.99124289  1.98534203  2.97887278]
 [ 0.99124289  1.98534203  2.97887278]
 [ 0.99124289  1.98534203  2.97887278]
 [ 0.99124289  1.98534203  2.97887278]]
1

Your input data is not normalized. After normalization as below, you can get the correct output.

x_train=np.array([[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3]])
x_train=keras.utils.normalize(x_train)  #newly added line
 ....
 ....
1
  • 1
    Not really an issue
    – user3103059
    Commented May 9, 2018 at 21:25
1

You can certainly build an autoencoder in Keras using the Sequential model. So I am no sure that the example you are referring to is exactly the "simplest possible autoencoder" you can create, as the article's author claims. Here's how I would do it:

from keras.models                   import Sequential
from keras.layers                   import Dense 

import numpy as np 

# this is the size of our encoded representations
encoding_dim = 3

np.random.seed(1)  # to ensure the same results

x_train=np.array([[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3]])

autoencoder = Sequential([ 
              Dense(encoding_dim,input_shape=(3,)), 
              Dense(encoding_dim)
])

autoencoder.compile(optimizer='adadelta', loss='mse')

autoencoder.fit(x_train, x_train,
            epochs=127,
            batch_size=4, 
            verbose=2)

out=autoencoder.predict(x_train)
print(out)

When running this example you get

 ....
 Epoch 127/127
 - 0s - loss: 1.8948e-14
[[ 1.  2.  3.]
 [ 1.  2.  3.]
 [ 1.  2.  3.]
 [ 1.  2.  3.]
 [ 1.  2.  3.]
 [ 1.  2.  3.]
 [ 1.  2.  3.]
 [ 1.  2.  3.]
 [ 1.  2.  3.]]

which is kind of nice...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.