49

I have several ip addresses like:

  1. 115.42.150.37
  2. 115.42.150.38
  3. 115.42.150.50

What type of regular expression should I write if I want to search for the all the 3 ip addresses? Eg, if I do 115.42.150.* (I will be able to search for all 3 ip addresses)

What I can do now is something like: /[0-9]{1-3}\.[0-9]{1-3}\.[0-9]{1-3}\.[0-9]{1-3}/ but it can't seems to work well.

Thanks.

  • possible duplicate of How to evaluate an IP? – Pekka Dec 16 '10 at 12:10
  • The dupe link has a good regex by Bill The Lizard – Pekka Dec 16 '10 at 12:10
  • 1
    I agree with Pekka, that the linked question should cover your requirements exactly. – Andrzej Doyle Dec 16 '10 at 12:16

20 Answers 20

22

The regex you've got already has several problems:

Firstly, it contains dots. In regex, a dot means "match any character", where you need to match just an actual dot. For this, you need to escape it, so put a back-slash in front of the dots.

Secondly, but you're matching any three digits in each section. This means you'll match any number between 0 and 999, which obviously contains a lot of invalid IP address numbers.

This can be solved by making the number matching more complex; there are other answers on this site which explain how to do that, but frankly it's not worth the effort -- in my opinion, you'd be much better off splitting the string by the dots, and then just validating the four blocks as numeric integer ranges -- ie:

if(block >= 0 && block <= 255) {....}

Hope that helps.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    This is a great answer IMHO. Not trying to do too much with regex is generally a good practice. Compare this answer to the other answers and think about which one produces the most readable/intuitive code. More readable code takes less time to understand and is less error-prone. – Dave Yarwood May 16 '16 at 15:50
  • 17
    One nitpick: Shouldn't it be block >= 0 ? – Dave Yarwood May 16 '16 at 15:50
  • @DaveYarwood: A ip address cannot be greater than 255. – Patrick Wozniak Nov 30 '18 at 12:09
  • 2
    Right, I just meant shouldn't it be >= instead of >? Because 0 is a valid block value. – Dave Yarwood Dec 1 '18 at 13:02
97

May be late but, someone could try:

Example of VALID IP address

115.42.150.37
192.168.0.1
110.234.52.124

Example of INVALID IP address

210.110 – must have 4 octets
255 – must have 4 octets
y.y.y.y – only digits are allowed
255.0.0.y – only digits are allowed
666.10.10.20 – octet number must be between [0-255]
4444.11.11.11 – octet number must be between [0-255]
33.3333.33.3 – octet number must be between [0-255]

JavaScript code to validate an IP address

function ValidateIPaddress(ipaddress) {  
  if (/^(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)$/.test(ipaddress)) {  
    return (true)  
  }  
  alert("You have entered an invalid IP address!")  
  return (false)  
}  
|improve this answer|||||
  • 6
    This worked great, I appreciate you putting in a whole function and examples of what will/will not pass. – SpaceNinja Mar 3 '15 at 15:34
  • 1
    Your regex was the only one I could get to pass my tests. Thanks! – TWright Jan 24 '17 at 3:43
  • Glad I could help. Enjoy Coding!! – ErickBest Mar 21 '17 at 10:20
  • Visualization of @ErickBest 's answer:jex.im/regulex/… – vikyd Dec 24 '18 at 11:15
  • Your solution should not allow '012.012.012.012' – Mahdi Pedram Feb 18 '19 at 6:58
44

Try this one, it's a shorter version:

^(?!0)(?!.*\.$)((1?\d?\d|25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d)(\.|$)){4}$

Explained:

^ start of string
  (?!0)         Assume IP cannot start with 0
  (?!.*\.$)     Make sure string does not end with a dot
  (
    (
    1?\d?\d|   A single digit, two digits, or 100-199
    25[0-5]|   The numbers 250-255
    2[0-4]\d   The numbers 200-249
    )
  \.|$ the number must be followed by either a dot or end-of-string - to match the last number
  ){4}         Expect exactly four of these
$ end of string

Unit test for a browser's console:

var rx=/^(?!0)(?!.*\.$)((1?\d?\d|25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d)(\.|$)){4}$/;
var valid=['1.2.3.4','11.11.11.11','123.123.123.123','255.250.249.0','1.12.123.255','127.0.0.1','1.0.0.0'];
var invalid=['0.1.1.1','01.1.1.1','012.1.1.1','1.2.3.4.','1.2.3\n4','1.2.3.4\n','259.0.0.1','123.','1.2.3.4.5','.1.2.3.4','1,2,3,4','1.2.333.4','1.299.3.4'];
valid.forEach(function(s){if (!rx.test(s))console.log('bad valid: '+s);});
invalid.forEach(function(s){if (rx.test(s)) console.log('bad invalid: '+s);});
|improve this answer|||||
  • 3
    0.0.0.0 is assumed to be valid – Dan K.K. Dec 16 '15 at 11:49
  • 2
    In that case you can omit the negative look-ahead (?!0) – oriadam Dec 17 '15 at 16:35
  • What about allowing subnets? pe: 192.168.1.10/24 – migueloop Apr 26 '18 at 7:37
  • @migueloop I didnt try it: ^(?!0)(?!.*\.$)((1?\d?\d|25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d)(\.|$)){4}(\/\d+)?$ – oriadam Apr 30 '18 at 11:24
  • I find this regex will cover ips and subnets. and make sure it will not allow leading 0 in each block. /^(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9]?[0-9])\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9]?[0-9])\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9]?[0-9])\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9]?[0-9])(\/([1-2][0-9]|3[0-2]|[0-9]))?$/ – Rob Jun 19 '19 at 15:20
20

If you are using nodejs try:

require('net').isIP('10.0.0.1')

doc net.isIP()

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    I like this one. This one is the best though maybe technically it doesn't answer the question exactly. Easy to use and easy to read. Many thanks! – Harlin Apr 18 '19 at 22:11
14

Try this one.. Source from here.

"\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\b"
|improve this answer|||||
  • /^(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?).(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?).(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?).(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)$/.test('10.10.10.10') – framp May 16 '13 at 8:17
11

If you want something more readable than regex for ipv4 in modern browsers you can go with

function checkIsIPV4(entry) {
  var blocks = entry.split(".");
  if(blocks.length === 4) {
    return blocks.every(function(block) {
      return parseInt(block,10) >=0 && parseInt(block,10) <= 255;
    });
  }
  return false;
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 4
    The IP 200sd.100f.85.200(V) (or any with letters in it) is returning true in your function. Just check also if !isNaN(block) on each block to avoid this. Nice funtion BTW. return !isNaN(block) && parseInt(block,10) >=0 && parseInt(block,10) <= 255; – Alvaro Flaño Larrondo Feb 5 '15 at 22:19
  • I think the function should be implemented as: function isIPv4Address(entry) { var blocks = entry.split("."); if(blocks.length === 4) { return blocks.every(function(block) { const value = parseInt(block, 10); if(value >= 0 && value <= 255){ var i = block.length; while (i--) { if(block[i] < '0' || block[i] > '9'){ return false; } } return true; } }); } return false; } – anhldbk Mar 24 '16 at 11:04
9

Below Solution doesn't accept Padding Zeros

Here is the cleanest way to validate an IP Address, Let's break it down:

Fact: a valid IP Address is has 4 octets, each octets can be a number between 0 - 255

Breakdown of Regex that matches any value between 0 - 255

  • 25[0-5] matches 250 - 255
  • 2[0-4][0-9] matches 200 - 249
  • 1[0-9][0-9] matches 100 - 199
  • [1-9][0-9]? matches 1 - 99
  • 0 matches 0
const octet = '(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]?|0)';

Notes: When using new RegExp you should use \\. instead of \. since string will get escaped twice.

function isValidIP(str) {
  const octet = '(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]?|0)';
  const regex = new RegExp(`^${octet}\\.${octet}\\.${octet}\\.${octet}$`);
  return regex.test(str);
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • Not all IP addresses have 4 octets. – mikemaccana yesterday
9

Don't write your own regex or copy paste! You probably won't cover all edge ceses (IPv6, but also octal IPs, etc). Use the is-ip package from npm:

var isIp = require('is-ip');

isIp('192.168.0.1');

isIp('1:2:3:4:5:6:7:8');

Will return a Boolean.

Downvoters: care to explain why using an actively maintained library is better than copy pasting from a website?

|improve this answer|||||
  • 4
    OP is asking for a valid JS solution. You just assume npm is available. – masi Dec 27 '16 at 10:36
  • 3
    @masi where would npm not be available? – mikemaccana Dec 29 '16 at 19:50
  • 1
    @mikemaccana, in a browser – elshev Nov 1 '19 at 9:46
  • @elshev npm has been used the most common source of packages for web browsers for years. Back in 2012 with gulp+browserify, then webpack in 2015 and now with rollup. – mikemaccana Nov 1 '19 at 10:03
  • I've upvoted, but please next time add a link to the repository – Rotem Mar 25 at 12:49
4
/^(?!.*\.$)((?!0\d)(1?\d?\d|25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d)(\.|$)){4}$/

Full credit to oriadam. I would have commented below his/her answer to suggest the double zero change I made, but I do not have enough reputation here yet...

change:

|improve this answer|||||
4

My version as es6 method, return true for valid IPs, false otherwise

isIP(ip) {
  if (typeof(ip) !== 'string')
    return false;
  if (!ip.match(/\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}/)) {
    return false;
  }
  return ip.split('.').filter(octect => octect >= 0 && octect <= 255).length === 4;
}
|improve this answer|||||
3

Regular expression for the IP address format:

/^(\d\d?)|(1\d\d)|(0\d\d)|(2[0-4]\d)|(2[0-5])\.(\d\d?)|(1\d\d)|(0\d\d)|(2[0-4]\d)|(2[0-5])\.(\d\d?)|(1\d\d)|(0\d\d)|(2[0-4]\d)|(2[0-5])$/;
|improve this answer|||||
3

Throwing in a late contribution:

^(?!\.)((^|\.)([1-9]?\d|1\d\d|2(5[0-5]|[0-4]\d))){4}$

Of the answers I checked, they're either longer or incomplete in their verification. Longer, in my experience, means harder to overlook and therefore more prone to be erroneous. And I like to avoid repeating similar patters, for the same reason.

The main part is, of course, the test for a number - 0 to 255, but also making sure it doesn't allow initial zeroes (except for when it's a single one):

[1-9]?\d|1\d\d|2(5[0-5]|[0-4]\d)

Three alternations - one for sub 100: [1-9]?\d, one for 100-199: 1\d\d and finally 200-255: 2(5[0-5]|[0-4]\d).

This is preceded by a test for start of line or a dot ., and this whole expression is tested for 4 times by the appended {4}.

This complete test for four byte representations is started by testing for start of line followed by a negative look ahead to avoid addresses starting with a .: ^(?!\.), and ended with a test for end of line ($).

See some samples here at regex101.

|improve this answer|||||
2

And instead of

{1-3}

you should put

{1,3}
|improve this answer|||||
2

If you wrtie the proper code you need only this very simple regular expression: /\d{1,3}/

function isIP(ip) {
    let arrIp = ip.split(".");
    if (arrIp.length !== 4) return "Invalid IP";
    let re = /\d{1,3}/;
    for (let oct of arrIp) {
        if (oct.match(re) === null) return "Invalid IP"
        if (Number(oct) < 0 || Number(oct) > 255)
            return "Invalid IP";
}
    return "Valid IP";
}

But actually you get even simpler code by not using any regular expression at all:

function isIp(ip) {
    var arrIp = ip.split(".");
    if (arrIp.length !== 4) return "Invalid IP";
    for (let oct of arrIp) {
        if ( isNaN(oct) || Number(oct) < 0 || Number(oct) > 255)
            return "Invalid IP";
}
    return "Valid IP";
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • Will fail if ip is undefined or if it's an integer. – Adam Parkin Mar 29 '18 at 20:51
2

A short RegEx: ^(?:(?:^|\.)(?:2(?:5[0-5]|[0-4]\d)|1?\d?\d)){4}$

Example

const isValidIp = value => (/^(?:(?:^|\.)(?:2(?:5[0-5]|[0-4]\d)|1?\d?\d)){4}$/.test(value) ? true : false);


// valid
console.log("isValidIp('0.0.0.0') ? ", isValidIp('0.0.0.0'));
console.log("isValidIp('115.42.150.37') ? ", isValidIp('115.42.150.37'));
console.log("isValidIp('192.168.0.1') ? ", isValidIp('192.168.0.1'));
console.log("isValidIp('110.234.52.124' ? ", isValidIp('110.234.52.124'));
console.log("isValidIp('115.42.150.37') ? ", isValidIp('115.42.150.37'));
console.log("isValidIp('115.42.150.38') ? ", isValidIp('115.42.150.38'));
console.log("isValidIp('115.42.150.50') ? ", isValidIp('115.42.150.50'));

// Invalid
console.log("isValidIp('210.110') ? ", isValidIp('210.110'));
console.log("isValidIp('255') ? ", isValidIp('255'));
console.log("isValidIp('y.y.y.y' ? ", isValidIp('y.y.y.y'));
console.log(" isValidIp('255.0.0.y') ? ", isValidIp('255.0.0.y'));
console.log("isValidIp('666.10.10.20') ? ", isValidIp('666.10.10.20'));
console.log("isValidIp('4444.11.11.11') ? ", isValidIp('4444.11.11.11'));
console.log("isValidIp('33.3333.33.3') ? ", isValidIp('33.3333.33.3'));

|improve this answer|||||
1

Simple Method

const invalidIp = ipAddress
   .split(".")
   .map(ip => Number(ip) >= 0 && Number(ip) <= 255)
   .includes(false);

if(invalidIp){
 // IP address is invalid
 // throw error here
}
|improve this answer|||||
0
\b(?:[0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\b

matches 0.0.0.0 through 999.999.999.999 use if you know the seachdata does not contain invalid IP addresses

\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\b

use to match IP numbers with accurracy - each of the 4 numbers is stored into it's own capturing group, so you can access them later

|improve this answer|||||
0

it is maybe better:

function checkIP(ip) {
    var x = ip.split("."), x1, x2, x3, x4;

    if (x.length == 4) {
        x1 = parseInt(x[0], 10);
        x2 = parseInt(x[1], 10);
        x3 = parseInt(x[2], 10);
        x4 = parseInt(x[3], 10);

        if (isNaN(x1) || isNaN(x2) || isNaN(x3) || isNaN(x4)) {
            return false;
        }

        if ((x1 >= 0 && x1 <= 255) && (x2 >= 0 && x2 <= 255) && (x3 >= 0 && x3 <= 255) && (x4 >= 0 && x4 <= 255)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}    
|improve this answer|||||
0

Always looking for variations, seemed to be a repetitive task so how about using forEach!

function checkIP(ip) {
  //assume IP is valid to start, once false is found, always false
  var test = true;

  //uses forEach method to test each block of IPv4 address
  ip.split('.').forEach(validateIP4);

  if (!test) 
    alert("Invalid IP4 format\n"+ip) 
  else 
    alert("IP4 format correct\n"+ip);

  function validateIP4(num, index, arr) {
    //returns NaN if not an Int
    item = parseInt(num, 10);
    //test validates Int, 0-255 range and 4 bytes of address
    // && test; at end required because this function called for each block
    test = !isNaN(item) && !isNaN(num) && item >=0 && item < 256 && arr.length==4 && test;
  }
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • Note fails if alphabetical char appears in a part as parseInt("2a00", 10) returns 2 and not NaN, so an ip of 200.200.2a00.200 ends up being accepted as valid when it's not. – Adam Parkin Mar 29 '18 at 20:40
  • Thanks Adam, modified code to look at both parseInt and original num by adding isNaN(num) – Dave Joyce Apr 20 '18 at 18:59
-1

A less stringent when testing the type not the validity. For example when sorting columns use this check to see which sort to use.

export const isIpAddress = (ipAddress) => 
    /^((\d){1,3}\.){3}(\d){1,3}$/.test(ipAddress)

When checking for validity use this test. An even more stringent test checking that the IP 8-bit numbers are in the range 0-255:

export const isValidIpAddress = (ipAddress) => 
    /^((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)$/.test(ipAddress)
|improve this answer|||||

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