1

I was given a challenge recently in school to create a simple program in Scala the does some calculations in a matrix, the thing is I have to do these calculations using 5 threads, since I had no prior knowledge of Scala I am stuck. I searched online but I did not find how to create the exact number of threads I want. This is the code:

import scala.math

object Test{

  def main(args: Array[String]){

    val M1: Seq[Seq[Int]] = List(
      List(1, 2, 3),
      List(4, 5, 6),
      List(7, 8, 9)
    )

    var tempData : Float= 0
    var count:Int = 1
    var finalData:Int=0

    for(i<-0 to M1.length-1; j<-0 to M1(0).length-1){

      count = 1

      tempData = M1(i)(j)+ calc(i-1,j)+calc(i,j-1)+calc(i+1,j)
      finalData = math.ceil(tempData/count).toInt
      printf("%d ", finalData)
    }

    def calc(i:Int, j:Int): Int ={

      if((i<0)|| (j<0) || (i>M1.length-1))
        return 0

      else{
        count +=1
        return M1(i)(j)}
      }
    }

I tried this:

    for (a <- 0 until 1) {
      val thread = new Thread {
        override def run { 

          for(i<-0 to M1.length-1; j<-0 to M1(0).length-1){

            count = 1

            tempData = M1(i)(j)+ calc(i-1,j)+calc(i,j-1)+calc(i+1,j)
            finalData = math.ceil(tempData/count).toInt
            printf("%d ", finalData)
          }
        }
      }
      thread.start
    }

but it only executed the same thing 10 times

15
  • side note : you seem to be adding unnecessary type annotations which hurts readability e.g. var count:Int = 1 => var count = 1
    – niceman
    Commented Jun 17, 2017 at 23:42
  • ok thanks, this is actually my first day learning scala so I dont know all the best practices yet Commented Jun 17, 2017 at 23:42
  • a <- 0 until 1 until is exclusive in its upper bound so the for loop will only execute one time creating only one thread, try to replace until with to for example and see for yourself
    – niceman
    Commented Jun 17, 2017 at 23:47
  • yes I tried that and it worked, actually the challenge is to create a single thread version and a multi thread version @niceman Commented Jun 17, 2017 at 23:49
  • "ince I had no prior knowledge of Scala I am stuck." I think the idea of being at school is to study, learn, then be able to do new things. I really don't understand why anyone would take a course, then look for other people to do the assignments for them. Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 11:34

2 Answers 2

1

Here's the original core of the calculation.

for(i<-0 to M1.length-1; j<-0 to M1(0).length-1){

  count = 1

  tempData = M1(i)(j)+ calc(i-1,j)+calc(i,j-1)+calc(i+1,j)
  finalData = math.ceil(tempData/count).toInt
  printf("%d ", finalData)
}

Let's actually build a result array

val R = Array.ofDim[Int](M1.length, M1(0).length)

var tempData : Float= 0
var count:Int = 1
var finalData:Int=0

for(i<-0 to M1.length-1; j<-0 to M1(0).length-1){

  count = 1

  tempData = M1(i)(j)+ calc(i-1,j)+calc(i,j-1)+calc(i+1,j)
  R(i)(j) = math.ceil(tempData/count).toInt
}

Now, that mutable count modified in one function and referenced in another is a bit of a code smell. Let's remove it - change calc to return an option, assemble a list of the things to average, and flatten to keep only the Some

val R = Array.ofDim[Int](M1.length, M1(0).length)

for (i <- 0 to M1.length - 1; j <- 0 to M1(0).length - 1) {

  val tempList = List(Some(M1(i)(j)), calc(i - 1, j), calc(i, j - 1), calc(i + 1, j)).flatten
  R(i)(j) = math.ceil(tempList.sum.toDouble / tempList.length).toInt
}

def calc(i: Int, j: Int): Option[Int] = {

  if ((i < 0) || (j < 0) || (i > M1.length - 1))
    None

  else {

    Some(M1(i)(j))
  }
}

Next, a side-effecting for is a bit of a code smell too. So in the inner loop, let's produce each row and in the outer loop a list of the rows...

val R = for (i <- 0 to M1.length - 1) yield {
  for (j <- 0 to M1(0).length - 1) yield {

    val tempList = List(Some(M1(i)(j)), calc(i - 1, j), calc(i, j - 1), calc(i + 1, j)).flatten
    math.ceil(tempList.sum / tempList.length).toInt
  }
}

Now, we read the Scala API and we notice ParSeq and Seq.par so we'd like to work with map and friends. So let's un-sugar the for comprehensions

val R = (0 until M1.length).map { i =>
  (0 until M1(0).length).map { j =>

    val tempList = List(Some(M1(i)(j)), calc(i - 1, j), calc(i, j - 1), calc(i + 1, j)).flatten
    math.ceil(tempList.sum / tempList.length).toInt
  }
}

This is our MotionBlurSingleThread. To make it parallel, we simply do

val R = (0 until M1.length).par.map { i =>
  (0 until M1(0).length).par.map { j =>

    val tempList = List(Some(M1(i)(j)), calc(i - 1, j), calc(i, j - 1), calc(i + 1, j)).flatten
    math.ceil(tempList.sum / tempList.length).toInt
  }.seq
}.seq

And this is our MotionBlurMultiThread. And it is nicely functional too (no mutable values)

The limit to 5 or 10 threads isn't in the challenge on Github, but if you need to do that you can look at scala parallel collections degree of parallelism and related questions

16
  • The code works just fine except it is giving me the wrong result. it should give me (3,3,4)(4,5,6)(6,7,8) but instead it is giving me (2, 2, 3)(4, 4, 5)(5, 6, 7), this was happening before, I printed the result inside the for loop and it was fine but when I printed the result outside the for loop it gave me the wrong result Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 17:25
  • this is the final project, it runs but I cant find the problem I stated above: github.com/RodrigoPina407/summer-intership-exercise Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 17:45
  • I just copied your calculation using i and j, but I think you may have some confusion over which is x and which is y. I will leave you to work the correction out :) Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 19:55
  • I thought about that but before, the calculation inside the for loop was correct but in the return statement was wrong Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 19:57
  • but I will double check, thank you for your help, this was a hard task because the challenge was given during my exams week so I had onoy yesterday and today to learn scala from scratch, thanks again Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 20:06
-2

I am not an expert, neither on Scala nor on concurrency. Scala approach to concurrency is through the use of actors and messaging, you can read a little about that here, Programming in Scala, chapter 30 Actors and Concurrency (the first edition is free but it is outdated). As I was telling, the edition is outdated and in the latest version of Scala (2.12) the actors library is no longer included, and they recommend to use Akka, you can read about that here.

So, I would not recommend learning about Scala, Sbt and Akka just for a challenge, but you can download an Akka quickstart here and customize the example given to your needs, it is nicely explained in the link. Each instance of the Actor has his own thread. You can read about actors and threads here, in specific, the section about state.

6
  • sorry, I really try not to do that, but even if there are newest versions (at a cost) I think the free edition is a common learning resource for Scala developers and most of the concepts are still valid. In this case it was important to say that is outdated because the library is not there anymore, but the approach is still valid using the new Akka library. Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 13:19
  • Actors are one approach to concurrency in Scala. Parallel collections are another, Futures are another. Stream (Fs2, scalaz.streams) yet another. Not to mention that everything written for Java concurrency is also available. Therefore you answer is wrong.
    – pedrofurla
    Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 18:37
  • I did not say EVER my solution was exhaustive. I started by clarifying that I was not an expert and I still believe it is the recommended approach. Sure you can use everything available in Java but then why not stick to Java, I think you should write an improved answer that enlighten us. Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 19:08
  • "Scala approach to concurrency is through the use of actors and messaging, you can read a little about that here,..."
    – pedrofurla
    Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 20:27
  • I think that is valid, if you search for "Scala approach to concurrency" on a search engine you'll get Actors at the top of the results, maybe I should have told the most common approach, or one of many approaches, I did not say it was the only approach either. To say that the approach is something does not imply that any other method is banned, just that it is common practice, and if someone without familiarity with some topic is searching for a quick answer I think support in terms of information available is a good criteria. But I'll really try to be much more specific next time. Commented Jun 18, 2017 at 21:38

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