77
import numpy as np

data = [
    (1, 1, None), 
    (1, 2, float(5)), 
    (1, 3, np.nan), 
    (1, 4, None), 
    (1, 5, float(10)), 
    (1, 6, float("nan")), 
    (1, 6, float("nan")),
]
df = spark.createDataFrame(data, ("session", "timestamp1", "id2"))

Expected output

dataframe with count of nan/null for each column

Note: The previous questions I found in stack overflow only checks for null & not nan. That's why I have created a new question.

I know I can use isnull() function in Spark to find number of Null values in Spark column but how to find Nan values in Spark dataframe?

0
156

You can use method shown here and replace isNull with isnan:

from pyspark.sql.functions import isnan, when, count, col

df.select([count(when(isnan(c), c)).alias(c) for c in df.columns]).show()
+-------+----------+---+
|session|timestamp1|id2|
+-------+----------+---+
|      0|         0|  3|
+-------+----------+---+

or

df.select([count(when(isnan(c) | col(c).isNull(), c)).alias(c) for c in df.columns]).show()
+-------+----------+---+
|session|timestamp1|id2|
+-------+----------+---+
|      0|         0|  5|
+-------+----------+---+
6
  • 16
    isNull vs isnan. These two links will help you. "isnan()" is a function of the pysparq.sql.function package, so you have to set which column you want to use as an argument of the function. "isNull()" belongs to pyspark.sql.Column package, so what you have to do is "yourColumn.isNull()"
    – titiro89
    Jun 20 '17 at 8:49
  • I am getting an error with this df.select([count(when(isnan(c) | col(c).isNull(), c)).alias(c) for c in df.columns]).show() - Is there any library I need to import. The error I am getting is illegal start of simple expression.
    – Manish
    Feb 11 '20 at 9:13
  • This solution does not work for timestamp columns Jan 20 at 12:29
  • @EricBellet for timestamp columns you can utilized df.dtypes: df.select([f.count(f.when(f.isnan(c), c)).alias(c) for c, t in df.dtypes if t != "timestamp"]).show()
    – elcombato
    Apr 20 at 14:57
  • scala equivalent: df.select(df.columns.map(c => count(when(isnan(col(c)), c)).alias(c)):_*) Aug 8 at 0:11
10

To make sure it does not fail for string, date and timestamp columns:

import pyspark.sql.functions as F
def count_missings(spark_df,sort=True):
    """
    Counts number of nulls and nans in each column
    """
    df = spark_df.select([F.count(F.when(F.isnan(c) | F.isnull(c), c)).alias(c) for (c,c_type) in spark_df.dtypes if c_type not in ('timestamp', 'string', 'date')]).toPandas()

    if len(df) == 0:
        print("There are no any missing values!")
        return None

    if sort:
        return df.rename(index={0: 'count'}).T.sort_values("count",ascending=False)

    return df

If you want to see the columns sorted based on the number of nans and nulls in descending:

count_missings(spark_df)

# | Col_A | 10 |
# | Col_C | 2  |
# | Col_B | 1  | 

If you don't want ordering and see them as a single row:

count_missings(spark_df, False)
# | Col_A | Col_B | Col_C |
# |  10   |   1   |   2   |
3
  • 2
    This function is computationally expensive for large datasets.
    – EmmaStin
    Mar 17 '20 at 0:19
  • Why do you think so?
    – gench
    May 21 at 7:45
  • add 'boolean' and 'binary' to your not inexclusion list
    – Pat Stroh
    Aug 31 at 15:44
7

For null values in the dataframe of pyspark

Dict_Null = {col:df.filter(df[col].isNull()).count() for col in df.columns}
Dict_Null

# The output in dict where key is column name and value is null values in that column

{'#': 0,
 'Name': 0,
 'Type 1': 0,
 'Type 2': 386,
 'Total': 0,
 'HP': 0,
 'Attack': 0,
 'Defense': 0,
 'Sp_Atk': 0,
 'Sp_Def': 0,
 'Speed': 0,
 'Generation': 0,
 'Legendary': 0}
0
4

Here is my one liner. Here 'c' is the name of the column

from pyspark.sql.functions import isnan, when, count, col, isNull
    
df.select('c').withColumn('isNull_c',F.col('c').isNull()).where('isNull_c = True').count()
1

An alternative to the already provided ways is to simply filter on the column like so

import pyspark.sql.functions as F
df = df.where(F.col('columnNameHere').isNull())

This has the added benefit that you don't have to add another column to do the filtering and it's quick on larger data sets.

0

I prefer this solution:

df = spark.table(selected_table).filter(condition)

counter = df.count()

df = df.select([(counter - count(c)).alias(c) for c in df.columns])

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