2

The following code is valid in C# 5.0:

private static String _prefix;
public static String Prefix
{
    get { return _prefix; }
    set {_prefix = (value == String.Empty) ? "abc_" : value;}
} 

I'm trying to write it more concise in C#6 using default initialization. (https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dn802602.aspx)

The following code is valid in C# 6.0 (but has not the same logic)

public String Prefix { get; set; } = "abc_";

I tried with:

public String Prefix { get; set; } value == String.Empty ? "abc_" : value

but this fails due to The name 'value' does not exist in the current context

How may I fix this error?

What I'm trying to do is set the property to "abc_" if it's null or empty and if it already has a value, don't touch it.

5

This code isn't about default initialization but about preventing string.Empty beeing set as the value after the initialization.

private static String _prefix;
public static String Prefix
{
    get { return _prefix; }
    set {_prefix = (value == String.Empty) ? "abc_" : value;}
}

This code line will set a default value once at the initialisation but doesn't prevent string.Empty from beeing set later.

public String Prefix { get; set; } = "abc_";

What I'm trying to do is set the property to "abc_" if it's null or empty and if it already has a value, don't touch it.

The only way to simplify your first code sniped in c# 6 is by using expression bodies. And to not only check if the string is empty but also if it is null you can use string.IsNullOrEmpty.

private static String _prefix;
public static String Prefix
{
    get => _prefix;
    set => _prefix = string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? "abc_" : value;
}
  • Thanks for the answer. Why isn't it about default initialization? Something like public String Prefix { get; set; } String anotherString == String.Empty ? "abc_" : "test" would actually be valid. My problem is that 'value' is not recognized. Or I misunderstand what you say? Thanks! – Happy Bird Jun 19 '17 at 10:54
  • 2
    @HappyBird value is not a valid keyword in that context. The default initialiser sets a default value once at the initialisation of the value and not whenever you set the value. So if you want to have a routine which checks every time you set the value you have to do it in the setter like you did allready. – NtFreX Jun 19 '17 at 10:58

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