16

Say, I have the following DataFrame with raw input data, and want to process it using a chain of pandas functions ("pipeline"). In particular, I want to rename and drop columns and add an additional column based on another.

    Gene stable ID  Gene name   Gene type   miRBase accession   miRBase ID
0   ENSG00000274494 MIR6832     miRNA       MI0022677           hsa-mir-6832
1   ENSG00000283386 MIR4659B    miRNA       MI0017291           hsa-mir-4659b
2   ENSG00000221456 MIR1202     miRNA       MI0006334           hsa-mir-1202
3   ENSG00000199102 MIR302C     miRNA       MI0000773           hsa-mir-302c

At the moment I do the following (which works):

tmp_df = df.\
         drop("Gene type", axis=1).\
         rename(columns = {
            "Gene stable ID": "ENSG",
            "Gene name": "gene_name",
            "miRBase accession": "MI",
            "miRBase ID": "mirna_name"
         })

result = tmp_df.assign(species = tmp_df.mirna_name.str[:3])

result:

    ENSG            gene_name   MI          mirna_name      species
0   ENSG00000274494 MIR6832     MI0022677   hsa-mir-6832    hsa
1   ENSG00000283386 MIR4659B    MI0017291   hsa-mir-4659b   hsa
2   ENSG00000221456 MIR1202     MI0006334   hsa-mir-1202    hsa
3   ENSG00000199102 MIR302C     MI0000773   hsa-mir-302c    hsa

Is it possible to put the assign command directly into the 'pipeline'? It feels cumbersome having to assign an additional temporary variable. I have no idea how I should reference the corresponding renamed column ('mirna_name') in that case.

4
  • It looks like there are some good answers already, but note that in this case there is really no disadvantage to just doing the rename as a separate step. In fact, for clarity I would generally prefer steps that merely drop and rename to be distinct from steps that actually do something (like creating a new variable derived from another variable with str[:3])
    – JohnE
    Commented Jun 19, 2017 at 14:54
  • 1
    In this particular case, yes. However, this blogpost nicely illustrates how you will end up "[spending] time coming up with appropriate names for variables" and why pipes are nice. Commented Jun 19, 2017 at 15:09
  • Yes, that was my sole point: "in this particular case". ;-) I agree in many cases pipe or assign gives you a better way to do it and let's you avoid creating temporary variables that you will later delete. In this case, I actually think it's worse (for readability) to combine everything on one line, but it's still a nice Q&A for how to do this sort of thing and I'm doing +1 for both the Q&A.
    – JohnE
    Commented Jun 19, 2017 at 15:56
  • last comment... the issue here is much less creating an "additional temporary variable" but rather creating an entire temporary dataframe. The latter essentially doubles the memory usage whereas the former probably only has a trivial effect.
    – JohnE
    Commented Jun 20, 2017 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

20

You can use pipe:

tmp_df = (
    df.drop("Gene type", axis=1)
    .rename(columns = {"Gene stable ID": "ENSG",
                       "Gene name": "gene_name",
                       "miRBase accession": "MI",
                       "miRBase ID": "mirna_name"}
            )
    .pipe(lambda x: x.assign(species = x.mirna_name.str[:3]))
)

tmp_df
Out[365]:
              ENSG gene_name         MI     mirna_name species
0  ENSG00000274494   MIR6832  MI0022677   hsa-mir-6832     hsa
1  ENSG00000283386  MIR4659B  MI0017291  hsa-mir-4659b     hsa
2  ENSG00000221456   MIR1202  MI0006334   hsa-mir-1202     hsa
3  ENSG00000199102   MIR302C  MI0000773   hsa-mir-302c     hsa

As @Tom pointed out, this can also be done without using pipe in this case:

(
    df.drop("Gene type", axis=1).
    .rename(columns = {"Gene stable ID": "ENSG",
                       "Gene name": "gene_name",
                       "miRBase accession": "MI",
                       "miRBase ID": "mirna_name"}
            )
    .assign(species = lambda x: x.mirna_name.str[:3])
)
4
  • 4
    The .pipe isn't needed here. You can put the lambda inside the assign like .assign(species = lambda x: x.mirna_name.str[:3]) Commented Jun 19, 2017 at 13:58
  • @Allen, do you want to update your answer accordingly? Commented Jun 19, 2017 at 21:45
  • .assign() has been around since 0.16/ 2015 in fact
    – smci
    Commented Dec 31, 2019 at 17:20
  • What about if you want to do a groupby before the assign? Commented Jan 11 at 0:27
3
result = df.drop("Gene type", axis=1).\
     rename(columns = {
        "Gene stable ID": "ENSG",
        "Gene name": "gene_name",
        "miRBase accession": "MI",
        "miRBase ID": "mirna_name"
     }).assign(species = df['miRBase ID'].str[:3])

You can reference the renamed column as df[column_name].

1
  • I wonder if this is correct. Inside assign(), the df still contains the previous column name. Following pandas example, you can see that the following produces an error: df.rename(columns={'temp_c': 'A'}).assign(temp_f=df['A'])
    – Amin.A
    Commented Sep 8, 2023 at 7:48
1

I found pandas-ply which introduces a magic symbol X for that purpose:

import pandas as pd 
from pandas_ply import X, install_ply
install_ply(pd)

df\
     .drop("Gene type", axis=1)\
     .rename(columns = {
        "Gene stable ID": "ENSG",
        "Gene name": "gene_name",
        "miRBase accession": "MI",
        "miRBase ID": "mirna_name"
     })\
     .ply_select("*", species = X.mirna_name.str[:3])

would be nice to have this in native pandas, though.

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