105

What is some starter code I could use to make a simple UIAlertView with one "OK" button on it?

  • Do you want to wait to perform an action until the OK button is clicked? – sudo rm -rf Dec 16 '10 at 17:52
  • 1
    @sudo rm -rf : No, I just need it to say "Dee dee doo doo" or something. No actions needed. – Linuxmint Dec 16 '10 at 17:53

10 Answers 10

229

When you want the alert to show, do this:

    UIAlertView *alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"ROFL" 
                                                    message:@"Dee dee doo doo." 
                                                    delegate:self 
                                                    cancelButtonTitle:@"OK" 
                                                    otherButtonTitles:nil];
[alert show];

    // If you're not using ARC, you will need to release the alert view.
    // [alert release];

If you want to do something when the button is clicked, implement this delegate method:

- (void)alertView:(UIAlertView *)alertView didDismissWithButtonIndex:(NSInteger)buttonIndex {
    // the user clicked OK
    if (buttonIndex == 0) {
        // do something here...
    }
}

And make sure your delegate conforms to UIAlertViewDelegate protocol:

@interface YourViewController : UIViewController <UIAlertViewDelegate> 
  • 4
    you could use tags if you have more than 1 alert views to determine who called the delegate. – Pnar Sbi Wer May 5 '14 at 1:17
68

Other answers already provide information for iOS 7 and older, however UIAlertView is deprecated in iOS 8.

In iOS 8+ you should use UIAlertController. It is a replacement for both UIAlertView and UIActionSheet. Documentation: UIAlertController Class Reference. And a nice article on NSHipster.

To create a simple Alert View you can do the following:

UIAlertController *alertController = [UIAlertController alertControllerWithTitle:@"Title"
                                                                         message:@"Message"
                                                                  preferredStyle:UIAlertControllerStyleAlert];
//We add buttons to the alert controller by creating UIAlertActions:
UIAlertAction *actionOk = [UIAlertAction actionWithTitle:@"Ok"
                                                   style:UIAlertActionStyleDefault
                                                 handler:nil]; //You can use a block here to handle a press on this button
[alertController addAction:actionOk];
[self presentViewController:alertController animated:YES completion:nil];

Swift 3 / 4 / 5:

let alertController = UIAlertController(title: "Title", message: "Message", preferredStyle: .alert)
//We add buttons to the alert controller by creating UIAlertActions:
let actionOk = UIAlertAction(title: "OK",
    style: .default,
    handler: nil) //You can use a block here to handle a press on this button

alertController.addAction(actionOk)

self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)

Note, that, since it was added in iOS 8, this code won't work on iOS 7 and older. So, sadly, for now we have to use version checks like so:

NSString *alertTitle = @"Title";
NSString *alertMessage = @"Message";
NSString *alertOkButtonText = @"Ok";

if (@available(iOS 8, *)) {
    UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:alertTitle
                                                        message:alertMessage
                                                       delegate:nil
                                              cancelButtonTitle:nil
                                              otherButtonTitles:alertOkButtonText, nil];
    [alertView show];
}
else {
    UIAlertController *alertController = [UIAlertController alertControllerWithTitle:alertTitle
                                                                             message:alertMessage
                                                                      preferredStyle:UIAlertControllerStyleAlert];
    //We add buttons to the alert controller by creating UIAlertActions:
    UIAlertAction *actionOk = [UIAlertAction actionWithTitle:alertOkButtonText
                                                       style:UIAlertActionStyleDefault
                                                     handler:nil]; //You can use a block here to handle a press on this button
    [alertController addAction:actionOk];
    [self presentViewController:alertController animated:YES completion:nil];
}

Swift 3 / 4 / 5:

let alertTitle = "Title"
let alertMessage = "Message"
let alertOkButtonText = "Ok"

if #available(iOS 8, *) {
    let alertController = UIAlertController(title: alertTitle, message: alertMessage, preferredStyle: .alert)
    //We add buttons to the alert controller by creating UIAlertActions:
    let actionOk = UIAlertAction(title: alertOkButtonText,
        style: .default,
        handler: nil) //You can use a block here to handle a press on this button

    alertController.addAction(actionOk)
    self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
}
else {
    let alertView = UIAlertView(title: alertTitle, message: alertMessage, delegate: nil, cancelButtonTitle: nil, otherButtonTitles: alertOkButtonText)
    alertView.show()
}

UPD: updated for Swift 5. Replaced outdated class presence check with availability check in Obj-C.

  • 1
    You shouldn't post code that could work but doesn't. Instead of using MyOwnUtilsClass, just write the code that does check ios version. – csharpwinphonexaml Jan 17 '16 at 10:41
  • 1
    @csharpwinphonexaml, I'm not agree. It would be an unnecessary complication of the code. The current version illustrates UIAlerView/UIAlertController usage, while system version check is not the topic of this question. In Swift there is a built in one line method of checking the OS version, so I used it. Objective-C has several methods, but none of them is elegant. – FreeNickname Jan 17 '16 at 11:20
  • 1
    I said it because I know not everyone is expert in understanding every piece of code and knowing how to replace it with a working one. – csharpwinphonexaml Jan 17 '16 at 11:56
11

UIAlertView is deprecated on iOS 8. Therefore, to create an alert on iOS 8 and above, it is recommended to use UIAlertController:

UIAlertController *alert = [UIAlertController alertControllerWithTitle:@"Title" message:@"Alert Message" preferredStyle:UIAlertControllerStyleAlert];
UIAlertAction *defaultAction = [UIAlertAction actionWithTitle:@"Ok" style:UIAlertActionStyleDefault handler:^(UIAlertAction *action){

    // Enter code here
}];
[alert addAction:defaultAction];

// Present action where needed
[self presentViewController:alert animated:YES completion:nil];

This is how I have implemented it.

9
UIAlertView *alert = [[UIAlertView alloc]
 initWithTitle:@"Title" 
 message:@"Message" 
 delegate:nil //or self
 cancelButtonTitle:@"OK"
 otherButtonTitles:nil];

 [alert show];
 [alert autorelease];
9
UIAlertView *myAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc] 
                         initWithTitle:@"Title"
                         message:@"Message"
                         delegate:self
                         cancelButtonTitle:@"Cancel"
                         otherButtonTitles:@"Ok",nil];
[myAlert show];
9

As a supplementary to the two previous answers (of user "sudo rm -rf" and "Evan Mulawski"), if you don't want to do anything when your alert view is clicked, you can just allocate, show and release it. You don't have to declare the delegate protocol.

3

Here is a complete method that only has one button, an 'ok', to close the UIAlert:

- (void) myAlert: (NSString*)errorMessage
{
    UIAlertView *myAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc]
                          initWithTitle:errorMessage
                          message:@""
                          delegate:self
                          cancelButtonTitle:nil
                          otherButtonTitles:@"ok", nil];
    myAlert.cancelButtonIndex = -1;
    [myAlert setTag:1000];
    [myAlert show];
}
1

This page shows how to add an UIAlertController if you are using Swift.

0

Simple alert with array data:

NSString *name = [[YourArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row ]valueForKey:@"Name"];

NSString *msg = [[YourArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row ]valueForKey:@"message"];

UIAlertView *alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:name
                                                message:msg
                                               delegate:self
                                      cancelButtonTitle:@"OK"
                                      otherButtonTitles:nil];
[alert show];
-1

For Swift 3:

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Alert", message: "Message", preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)

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