32

I would like to add the L1 regularizer to the activations output from a ReLU. More generally, how does one add a regularizer only to a particular layer in the network?


Related material:

  • This similar post refers to adding L2 regularization, but it appears to add the regularization penalty to all layers of the network.

  • nn.modules.loss.L1Loss() seems relevant, but I do not yet understand how to use this.

  • The legacy module L1Penalty seems relevant also, but why has it been deprecated?

1
  • For a relatively high-level solution, you can look at link . This gives you a keras-like interface for doing many things easily in pytorch, and specifically adding various regularizers. Oct 3, 2017 at 3:52

5 Answers 5

37

Here is how you do this:

  • In your Module's forward return final output and layers' output for which you want to apply L1 regularization
  • loss variable will be sum of cross entropy loss of output w.r.t. targets and L1 penalties.

Here's an example code

import torch
from torch.autograd import Variable
from torch.nn import functional as F


class MLP(torch.nn.Module):
    def __init__(self):
        super(MLP, self).__init__()
        self.linear1 = torch.nn.Linear(128, 32)
        self.linear2 = torch.nn.Linear(32, 16)
        self.linear3 = torch.nn.Linear(16, 2)

    def forward(self, x):
        layer1_out = F.relu(self.linear1(x))
        layer2_out = F.relu(self.linear2(layer1_out))
        out = self.linear3(layer2_out)
        return out, layer1_out, layer2_out

batchsize = 4
lambda1, lambda2 = 0.5, 0.01

model = MLP()
optimizer = torch.optim.SGD(model.parameters(), lr=1e-4)

# usually following code is looped over all batches 
# but let's just do a dummy batch for brevity

inputs = Variable(torch.rand(batchsize, 128))
targets = Variable(torch.ones(batchsize).long())

optimizer.zero_grad()
outputs, layer1_out, layer2_out = model(inputs)
cross_entropy_loss = F.cross_entropy(outputs, targets)

all_linear1_params = torch.cat([x.view(-1) for x in model.linear1.parameters()])
all_linear2_params = torch.cat([x.view(-1) for x in model.linear2.parameters()])
l1_regularization = lambda1 * torch.norm(all_linear1_params, 1)
l2_regularization = lambda2 * torch.norm(all_linear2_params, 2)

loss = cross_entropy_loss + l1_regularization + l2_regularization
loss.backward()
optimizer.step()
9
  • 1
    thank you I did not realize you could change the "signature" of a core function such as forward()
    – Bull
    Dec 24, 2017 at 1:12
  • 2
    Does this not regularize the weights of the layer? I guess the original poster wants to regularize the outputs of a layer not the weights. How can one only regularize (make sparse) the activations in PyTorch?
    – M_Gorky
    Dec 20, 2018 at 20:20
  • 3
    Looks like there is an error in the answer. For norm(all_linear2_params, 2): torch returns the square root of the L2 regularization. I.e the expression should be raised to the power of 2 Aug 28, 2019 at 12:13
  • 3
    Why do you need to return layer1_out, layer2_out from forward when those variables are not used?
    – Omroth
    Sep 2, 2020 at 10:31
  • 3
    This regularizes the weights, you should be regularizing the returned layer outputs (i.e. activations). That's why you returned them in the first place! The regularization terms should look something like: l1_regularization = lambda1 * torch.norm(layer1_out, 1) l2_regularization = lambda2 * torch.norm(layer2_out, 2) Feb 14, 2021 at 8:57
19

All of the (other current) responses are incorrect in some way as the question is about adding regularization to activation. This one is closest in that it suggests summing the norms of the outputs, which is correct, but the code sums the norms of the weights, which is incorrect.

The correct way is not to modify the network code, but rather to capture the outputs via a forward hook, as in the OutputHook class. From there, the summing of the norms of the outputs is straightforward, but one needs to take care to clear the captured outputs every iteration.

import torch


class OutputHook(list):
    """ Hook to capture module outputs.
    """
    def __call__(self, module, input, output):
        self.append(output)


class MLP(torch.nn.Module):
    def __init__(self):
        super(MLP, self).__init__()
        self.linear1 = torch.nn.Linear(128, 32)
        self.linear2 = torch.nn.Linear(32, 16)
        self.linear3 = torch.nn.Linear(16, 2)
        # Instantiate ReLU, so a hook can be registered to capture its output.
        self.relu = torch.nn.ReLU()

    def forward(self, x):
        layer1_out = self.relu(self.linear1(x))
        layer2_out = self.relu(self.linear2(layer1_out))
        out = self.linear3(layer2_out)
        return out


batch_size = 4
l1_lambda = 0.01

model = MLP()
optimizer = torch.optim.SGD(model.parameters(), lr=1e-4)
# Register hook to capture the ReLU outputs. Non-trivial networks will often
# require hooks to be applied more judiciously.
output_hook = OutputHook()
model.relu.register_forward_hook(output_hook)

inputs = torch.rand(batch_size, 128)
targets = torch.ones(batch_size).long()

optimizer.zero_grad()
outputs = model(inputs)
cross_entropy_loss = torch.nn.functional.cross_entropy(outputs, targets)

# Compute the L1 penalty over the ReLU outputs captured by the hook.
l1_penalty = 0.
for output in output_hook:
    l1_penalty += torch.norm(output, 1)
l1_penalty *= l1_lambda

loss = cross_entropy_loss + l1_penalty
loss.backward()
optimizer.step()
output_hook.clear()
2
  • 1
    Not really understand why you calculate L1 as summed norm of the output as it's common knowledge that L1 regularization = summed norm of weights. Can you elaborate ?
    – Tung Vs
    Jul 18, 2021 at 9:21
  • 1
    @TungVs L1 regularization of weights is the summed or mean L1 norm of weights. L1 regularization of activations is the summed or mean L1 norm of activations. They're both legitimate regularizers. There's a lot of literature on this. See this recent example. There are plenty of others.
    – ndronen
    Jul 19, 2021 at 14:43
7

@Sasank Chilamkurthy Regularization should be the weighting parameter of each layer of the model, not the output of each layer. please look below: Regularization

import torch
from torch.autograd import Variable
from torch.nn import functional as F


class MLP(torch.nn.Module):
    def __init__(self):
        super(MLP, self).__init__()
        self.linear1 = torch.nn.Linear(128, 32)
        self.linear2 = torch.nn.Linear(32, 16)
        self.linear3 = torch.nn.Linear(16, 2)
    def forward(self, x):
        layer1_out = F.relu(self.linear1(x))
        layer2_out = F.relu(self.linear2(layer1_out))
        out = self.linear3(layer2_out)
        return out

batchsize = 4
lambda1, lambda2 = 0.5, 0.01

model = MLP()
optimizer = torch.optim.SGD(model.parameters(), lr=1e-4)

inputs = Variable(torch.rand(batchsize, 128))
targets = Variable(torch.ones(batchsize).long())
l1_regularization, l2_regularization = torch.tensor(0), torch.tensor(0)

optimizer.zero_grad()
outputs = model(inputs)
cross_entropy_loss = F.cross_entropy(outputs, targets)
for param in model.parameters():
    l1_regularization += torch.norm(param, 1)**2
    l2_regularization += torch.norm(param, 2)**2

loss = cross_entropy_loss + l1_regularization + l2_regularization
loss.backward()
optimizer.step()
3
  • 1
    Looks like there is an error in the answer. For norm(param, 2): torch returns the square root of the L2 regularization. I.e the expression should be raised to the power of 2 Aug 28, 2019 at 12:13
  • 1
    Regularizing the weights is more standard but there is work suggesting (L1) regularizing activations instead is preferable.
    – daknowles
    Mar 28, 2020 at 19:28
  • 1
    As pointed out in the answer above, anything can be subject to regularization. Apr 3, 2021 at 13:46
3

I think the original post wants to regularize the output from ReLU, so the regularizer should be on the output, not the weights of the network. They are not the same!

  • with l1-norm regularize the weights is training a neural network has sparse weights

  • with l1-norm regularize the output of a layer is training a network has a sparse output of this certain layer.

Either these above answers (including the accepted one) missed the point, or I misunderstanding the original post question.

1

You can apply L1 regularization of the weights of a single layer of your model my_layer to the loss function with the following code:

def l1_penalty(params, l1_lambda=0.001):
    """Returns the L1 penalty of the params."""
    l1_norm = sum(p.abs().sum() for p in params)
    return l1_lambda*l1_norm

loss = loss_fn(outputs, labels) + l1_penalty(my_layer.parameters())

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