65

It will be the best explain in on example

expected(someNumber).toBe(1).or.toBe(-2).or.toBe(22) // expect result is 1 or -2 or 22

This is bad syntax, but can do sth like that in jest?

8
  • What do you mean by "bad syntax"? Also, why are you expecting three different results? Jun 20, 2017 at 13:20
  • This is imaginary syntax -- how it could be, but it isn't :) I wrote it only to show my thoughts
    – kspacja
    Jun 20, 2017 at 13:23
  • If this isn't possible with jest, then consider changing your logic. Don't test for three different outputs. Jun 20, 2017 at 13:23
  • I would like to writer sth like regression test. One lib give me a result, but I don't know in advance what it will be based on input. Only what I wanna check is that if result is one of options in array
    – kspacja
    Jun 20, 2017 at 13:43
  • Can you event unit test a function like that? Jun 20, 2017 at 13:45

6 Answers 6

29

A simple way around this is to use the standard .toContain() matcher (https://jestjs.io/docs/en/expect#tocontainitem) and reverse the expect statement:

expect([1, -2, 22]).toContain(someNumber);
0
25

If you really needed to do exactly that, I suppose you could put the logical comparisons inside the expect call, e.g.

expect(someNumber === 1 || someNumber === -2 || someNumber === 22).toBeTruthy();

If this is just for a "quick and dirty" check, this might suffice.

However, as suggested by several comments under your question, there seem to be several "code smells" that make both your initial problem as well as the above solution seem like an inappropriate way of conducting a test.

First, in terms of my proposed solution, that use of toBeTruthy is a corruption of the way Jasmine/Jest matchers are meant to be used. It's a bit like using expect(someNumber === 42).toBeTruthy(); instead of expect(someNumber).toBe(42). The structure of Jest/Jasmine tests is to provide the actual value in the expect call (i.e. expect(actualValue)) and the expected value in the matcher (e.g. toBe(expectedValue) or toBeTruthy() where expectedValue and true are the expected values respectively). In the case above, the actual value is (inappropriately) provided in the expect call, with the toBeTruthy matcher simply verifying this fact.

It might be that you need to separate your tests. For example, perhaps you have a function (e.g. called yourFunction) that you are testing that provides (at least) 3 different possible discrete outputs. I would presume that the value of the output depends on the value of the input. If that is the case, you should probably test all input/output combinations separately, e.g.

it('should return 1 for "input A" ', () => {
  const someNumber = yourFunction("input A");
  expect(someNumber).toBe(1);
});

it('should return -2 for "input B" ', () => {
  const someNumber = yourFunction("input B");
  expect(someNumber).toBe(-2);
});

it('should return 22 for "input C" ', () => {
  const someNumber = yourFunction("input C");
  expect(someNumber).toBe(22);
});

..or at least...

it('should return the appropriate values for the appropriate input ', () => {
  let someNumber;
  someNumber = yourFunction("input A");
  expect(someNumber).toBe(1);

  someNumber = yourFunction("input B");
  expect(someNumber).toBe(-2);

  someNumber = yourFunction("input C");
  expect(someNumber).toBe(22);
});

One of the positive consequences of doing this is that, if your code changes in the future such that, e.g. one (but only one) of the conditions changes (in terms of either input or output), you only need to update one of three simpler tests instead of the single more complicated aggregate test. Additionally, with the tests separated this way, a failing test will more quickly tell you exactly where the problem is, e.g. with "input A", "input B", or "input C".

Alternatively, you may need to actually refactor yourFunction, i.e. the code-under-test itself. Do you really want to have a particular function in your code returning three separate discrete values depending on different input? Perhaps so, but I would examine the code separately to see if it needs to be re-written. It's hard to comment on this further without knowing more details about yourFunction.

3
  • 2
    To be fair, there are several situations where it's valid for a function under test to return one of several values---e.g. a findShortestPath() in some graph where there are multiple short paths of the same length.
    – wgoodall01
    Mar 12, 2019 at 19:50
  • found this method helpful when feature flagging formatting / masking text
    – devonj
    Nov 19, 2020 at 18:05
  • I just ran into such a situation when my datetime related tests failed because DST started yesterday, and 01:00 just became +02:00... Mar 29, 2021 at 7:40
22

To avoid putting all the logical comparisons in one statement and using toBeTruthy(), you can use nested try/catch statements:

try {
  expect(someNumber).toBe(1)
}
catch{
  try {
    expect(someNumber).toBe(-2)
  }
  catch{
    expect(someNumber).toBe(22)
  }
}

To make it more convenient and more readable, you can put this into a helper function:

function expect_or(...tests) {
  if (!tests || !Array.isArray(tests)) return;
  try {
    tests.shift()?.();
  } catch (e) {
    if (tests.length) expect_or(...tests);
    else throw e;
  }
}

NB: With Typescript replace line 1 with function expect_or(...tests: (() => void)[]) { to add types to the function parameter.

and use it like this:

 expect_or(
   () => expect(someNumber).toBe(1),
   () => expect(someNumber).toBe(-2),
   () => expect(someNumber).toBe(22)
 );
3
  • 1
    This is great. Surprised something like this doesn't exist in the library itself.
    – tremby
    Feb 4, 2021 at 3:52
  • 1
    This approach does not seem to work for .toMatchSnapshot() assertion in the try..
    – Norfeldt
    Aug 17, 2021 at 13:55
  • Thank you for pointing this out. It seems that .toMatchSnapshot() does not throw an exception when the match fails - that's why it does not work with my solution. You can change this behavior as described here: jestjs.io/docs/expect#bail-out, but I would be cautious, as this could clash with the way jest-snapshots work. Aug 18, 2021 at 14:59
7

As @JrGiant suggested, there could be a toBeOneOf, however, it is easy top implement your own matcher:

Example in TypeScript:

expect.extend({
  toBeOneOf(received: any, items: Array<any>) {
    const pass = items.includes(received);
    const message = () =>
      `expected ${received} to be contained in array [${items}]`;
    if (pass) {
      return {
        message,
        pass: true
      };
    }
    return {
      message,
      pass: false
    };
  }
});

// Declare that jest contains toBeOneOf
// If you are not using TypeScript, remove this "declare global" altogether
declare global {
  namespace jest {
    interface Matchers<R> {
      toBeOneOf(items: Array<any>): CustomMatcherResult;
    }
  }
}

describe("arrays", () => {
  describe("getRandomItemFromArray", () => {
    it("should return one of the expected - 1", () => {
      expect(getRandomItemFromArray([1, 2])).toBeOneOf([1, 2])
    });
  });
});

3

I was also looking for a solution for the expect.oneOf issue. You may want to checkout d4nyll's solution.

Here is an example of how it could work.

expect(myfunction()).toBeOneOf([1, -2, 22]);
3

I recommend using the .toContain(item) matcher. The documentation can be found here.

The below code should work well:

expect([1, -2, 22]).toContain(someNumber);
1
  • 2
    + toContainEqual if you want deep equality for objects
    – Kangur
    Jan 21, 2021 at 10:54

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