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I read the documentation for the function Intn https://golang.org/pkg/math/rand/#Intn but I don't understand what they mean I know how random differs from pseudo-random. But how can I simulate a random in the range from 1 to 1000 for example?

package main
import (
    "fmt"
    "math/rand"
)

func main() {
    fmt.Println(randInt(1, 1000))
}

func randInt(min int, max int) int {
    return min + rand.Intn(max-min)
}

The answer is always 879

func main() {
    fmt.Print(rand.Intn(100))
}

The answer is always 81

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  • 2
    Are you doing this on the Go playground by any chance?
    – Adrian
    Jun 20 '17 at 17:19
3

You need to "Seed" the random number generator. This is like the code that tells the pseudo random number generator how to generate your numbers. Now, you can't just give this any number, or you are going to generate the same set every time. Often a good practice is to seed with the current time.

package main
import (
    "fmt"
    "math/rand"
    "time"    #ADDED
)

func main() {
    // Seed should be set once, better spot is func init()
    rand.Seed(time.Now().UTC().UnixNano())   #ADDED
    fmt.Println(randInt(1, 1000))
}

func randInt(min int, max int) int {
    return min + rand.Intn(max-min)
}

Now every time you call your randInt() function, it will use the time from when the seed function was called to generate the random number.

2
  • Thank you very much, it works! How does the function rand.Seed depend on the function randInt? Or is it somehow globally affecting the application and Intn?
    – gomazafaka
    Jun 20 '17 at 18:42
  • It is modifying the rand object. Think of it as a value stored within rand. By default, this is set to 1. We just changed it to the current time. Jun 20 '17 at 18:49
1

Two points. First, as the documentation for math/rand states right at the top:

Use the Seed function to initialize the default Source if different behavior is required for each run.

If you don't Seed it with something different each run (e.g. clock time), you'll get the same result every run, because the default seed is always 1.

Second, if you're running this on the Playground, you'll get the same result every time regardless because it caches the results of executions. If the code is the same, the result will be the same.

2
  • Does this mean that Intn takes data from some internal program structures that must be set with the help of the Seed? It was incomprehensible to me from the documentation.
    – gomazafaka
    Jun 20 '17 at 18:46
  • All PRNGs operate basically the same way, permuting numbers to achieve a nearly-random result. They usually take the previous random number as the input to the next random number; that means that to generate the first random number, they need a starting point, and that's the "seed". Starting with the same seed yields the same sequence of numbers.
    – Adrian
    Jun 20 '17 at 18:50

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