5

Assume that I don't know if one Optional is empty, or if both are present. In the latter case, I always want to prefer a over b:

final Optional<String> a = Optional.of("1");
final Optional<String> b = Optional.empty();
if (a.isPresent() || b.isPresent()) {
  // prefer a over b
  Integer result = a
      .map(s -> s + "0")
      .map(Integer::parseInt)
      .orElseGet(() -> Integer.parseInt(b.get())); // <-- warning for b.get()
  System.out.println(result);
}

In my real code, Idea is warning me at this point:

'Optional.get()' without 'isPresent()' check.

Why is that? I am checking priorly if either a or b is present. Also, this code works as expected, the output is 10. If I put b = Optional.of("2") the output is still 10 because I prefer a. If I then put a = Optional.empty(), the output is 2 as expected.

Am I doing something wrong, or is Idea's linter wrong?

  • 3
    It's confused by the a.isPresent() || b.isPresent() condition, and can't figure out that under this circumstance b must be present. – Louis Wasserman Jun 20 '17 at 20:04
  • 1
    @LouisWasserman, actually the condition is handled nicely. IDEA just should know that !a.isPresent() implies !a.map(anything).isPresent() (which it does not know now). Also it has to look into lambdas/methodref and understand that they never return null (otherwise the warning is correct). It's too much analysis, but probably it will do it in future. – Tagir Valeev Jun 29 '17 at 14:54
3

It's idea that is confused here, it's internal rules probably suppose the checks to isPresent in the the same Optional chaining.

This obviously lays outside the Optional checks itself due to (a.isPresent() || b.isPresent()); it can't possible tell that there's no way to call orElseGet on an empty optional b because of those checks...

  • I would have assumed the linter to be smarter and be able to detect this OR. If I only check if b.isPresent(), the warning goes away. But well, thanks for confirming! – Blacklight Jun 20 '17 at 20:16
  • 2
    @Blacklight the correct thing to do is fill a bug for this and see what they point to; the developers there are usually very responsive. You might improve the tool this way – Eugene Jun 20 '17 at 20:17
  • Will do, just wanted to double check my thinking first. – Blacklight Jun 20 '17 at 20:18
  • Checking the correctness of this code is far more complicated than just considering the logic of the || operator. After all, you are not invoking orElseGet on a, you are invoking it on the optional returned by map, which has been called on the result of another map invocation. In order to prove that the resulting optional can never be empty, it has to prove that neither s -> s + "0" nor Integer::parseInt can ever evaluate to null, as otherwise, map would return an empty optional, despite a being non-empty. – Holger Jun 21 '17 at 11:06
  • In Java 9, you would just write a.map(s -> s + "0").or(() -> b).map(Integer::parseInt) .ifPresent(System.out::println); without any if statements and you’re done… – Holger Jun 21 '17 at 11:08
4

It looks like IDEAs linting is wrong in this case, but it's likely that it's to do with the complexity of deciding if b.isPresent() is guaranteed in the a.orElseGet(...) fallback.

Generally I find that if the IDE is warning be about something, it usually a good idea (pun intended) to fix it, as the next developer coming to look at the code will also struggle to decipher the intention behind the code.

As you're already using Optional, I would consider not using the isPresent method at all and use the api to do the work for you. I can see two options (pun intended) that should satisfy the warning.

You can provide a suitable fallback if both are not present:

final Optional<String> a = Optional.of("1");
final Optional<String> b = Optional.empty();

// prefer a over b
Integer result = a
    .map(s -> s + "0")
    .map(Integer::parseInt)
    .orElseGet(() -> b.map(Integer::parseInt).orElse(0));

System.out.println(result);

If you never expect both to be empty, you can throw an IllegalStateException instead of the fallback:

final Optional<String> a = Optional.of("1");
final Optional<String> b = Optional.empty();

// prefer a over b
Integer result = a
    .map(s -> s + "0")
    .map(Integer::parseInt)
    .orElseGet(() -> b.map(Integer::parseInt).orElseThrow(IllegalStateException::new));

System.out.println(result);
  • I like your suggestions, thanks. They indeed get rid of the warning. I actually deemed my initial code to not be too complex.. Instead of having an if-clause around the whole code, I now need an if-clause to check if the result is null (the integer was just for the example), or a try/catch block. And I don't find the code clearer or more comprehensible then. Still, good alternatives, thanks. – Blacklight Jun 20 '17 at 21:01
2

Long story short: fixed in IDEA 2017.3 (see IDEA-174759).

Yes, it's guaranteed that b is present at b.get() point. And yes, IDEA warning is wrong. The reason is that IDEA analysis in current version is not sophisticated enough to understand what's going on inside the optional chain. Note that the result also depends on the fact that Integer::parseInt method reference never produces null. Otherwise Optional.map may produce empty optional even if a is present. Consider, for example, the following code:

private static Integer myParseInt(String s) {
    try {
        return Integer.parseInt(s);
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        return null;
    }
}

...

if (a.isPresent() || b.isPresent()) {
    // prefer a over b
    Integer result = a.map(s -> s + "0").map(MyClass::myParseInt)
                      .orElseGet(() -> Integer.parseInt(b.get()));
    System.out.println(result);
}

In this case b could be absent if a contains non-numerical string, so here having warning is desired.

We improve IDEA static analysis constantly. In 2017.3 it will understand these constructs:

IDEA 2017.3

As you can see now warning is not displayed in original code, but displayed for nullable myParseInt.

IDEA 2017.3 is not yet available. However, as this feature is part of IDEA Community, you can build it by yourself using GitHub sources from master branch.

Disclaimer: I'm IntelliJ IDEA developer and I'm working to fix this case.

  • 1
    Thank you Tagir, much appreciated and very fast reaction. I'm not sure how many will run into such situation, but I definitely did and it's nice to see Idea constantly improving also based on developer feedback. – Blacklight Jul 27 '17 at 16:41
0

You are checking a.isPresent() and b.isPresent() in or condition. You are getting warning because it may happen that the first part of the condition turns out to be true "a.isPresent()" but b.isPresent() is false . However, due to the || condition the code inside the block will start executing. I this case b.get will fail with "NoSuchElementException".

Though according to your logic b.get() is not reachable if b is absent or empty, because you are preferring a over b. But the IDE analyzes and tells you proactively what all can go wrong or what is a bad practice in your code.

Try to do something like:

if(a.isPresent()){
//logic if a is there
}
else if(b.isPresent){
//logic if a not there and b is there
}
else{
logic if both are not there
}
  • I sure could have done that just to avoid the linter warning, but that's not really the point. The question was more pointed to why is Idea warning when both the if-clause and the terminal operation are known. – Blacklight Jun 20 '17 at 20:24
  • I have observed several times that IDEA gives warning not only on the current variable value basis but sometime it tells you intelligently what can go wrong. Here it is a combination of both as it knows that the b.get() will not be reachable but it is showing error because it knows that b is empty. – Priya Jain Jun 20 '17 at 20:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.