15

I want to generate a json that's something like this:

{
   "A": 1,
   "B": "bVal",
   "C": "cVal"
}

But I want to keep my code generic enough that I can replace the key-pair "C" with any other type of json object that I want. I tried doing something like what I have below:

    type JsonMessage struct {
        A int `json:"A"`
        B string `json:"B,omitempty"`
        genericObj interface{} 
    }

    type JsonObj struct {
        C string `json:"C"`
    }

    func main() {
        myJsonObj := JsonObj{C: "cVal"}
        myJson := JsonMessage{A: 1, B: "bValue", genericObj: myJsonObj}

        body, _ := json.Marshal(myJson)
        fmt.Print(body)
    }

But the output is just this:

{
   "A": 1,
   "B": "bVal"
}

Is there a different way to approach this?

3
  • When I tried your code here play.golang.org/p/1NDMsUJtqW It works fine. {"A":1,"B":"bValue","GenericObj":{"C":"cVal"}}
    – rnk
    Jun 21, 2017 at 0:38
  • Oops - "GenericObj" should've been a private variable "genericObj". And in your playground output, it has the "GenericObj" json key wrapped around "C":"cVal", which I don't want.
    – J.Doe
    Jun 21, 2017 at 0:40
  • 4
    For what it's worth, un-exported fields will not be marshaled in Go.
    – squiguy
    Jun 21, 2017 at 0:43

2 Answers 2

16

This is precisely why json.RawMessage exists.

Here is an example straight from the Go docs:

package main

import (
    "encoding/json"
    "fmt"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    h := json.RawMessage(`{"precomputed": true}`)

    c := struct {
        Header *json.RawMessage `json:"header"`
        Body   string           `json:"body"`
    }{Header: &h, Body: "Hello Gophers!"}

    b, err := json.MarshalIndent(&c, "", "\t")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println("error:", err)
    }
    os.Stdout.Write(b)

}

Here is the output:

{
    "header": {
        "precomputed": true
    },
    "body": "Hello Gophers!"
}

Go Playground: https://play.golang.org/p/skYJT1WyM1C

Of course you can marshal a value before time to get the raw bytes in your case.

5
  • In the example given, wouldn't the output json always have an object called "Header" containing the RawMessage? Is there a way to change the json field name from "Header" to something else dynamically, based on how we construct it?
    – J.Doe
    Jun 22, 2017 at 23:54
  • 1
    Essentially in my code I will get a map[string]interface that has been unmarshalled from an input json and I want to put this directly into my output JsonMessage struct without adding any top-level json field. Right now the way that is proposed will wrap the input json around another json field with the name of the JsonMessage field (i.e "Header")
    – J.Doe
    Jun 23, 2017 at 0:12
  • 1
    @J.Doe I don't believe there is a way to dynamically change the JSON field name, no. Unless you do some code generation it doesn't seem possible.
    – squiguy
    Jun 23, 2017 at 0:14
  • As I thought. Thanks@
    – J.Doe
    Jun 23, 2017 at 16:09
  • If there is a limited set of JSON field names, you could always define all of them and check which one is set.
    – Pita
    Jun 26, 2017 at 20:56
-1
package main

import (
    "encoding/json"
    "fmt"
)

type JsonMessage struct {
    A          int    `json:"A"`
    B          string `json:"B,omitempty"`
    // simply make this field capitalized,and it will be included in the 
    // json string
    GenericObj interface{}
}

type JsonObj struct {
    C string `json:"C"`
}

func main() {
    myJsonObj := JsonObj{C: "cVal"}
    myJson := JsonMessage{A: 1, B: "bValue", GenericObj: myJsonObj}

    body, _ := json.Marshal(myJson)
    fmt.Println(string(body))
}
{"A":1,"B":"bValue","GenericObj":{"C":"cVal"}}
2
  • The output is obviously different from the desired output from OP, thus this doesn't answer the question.
    – jso
    Oct 20, 2021 at 15:13
  • Doesn't solve the question, since it requires private variable genericObj
    – dchang
    Feb 23, 2023 at 19:33

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