304

According to Google Calculator (-13) % 64 is 51.

According to Javascript (see this JSBin) it is -13.

How do I fix this?

7
  • 2
    essentially a duplicate of How does java do modulus calculations with negative numbers? even though this is a javascript question. Dec 18 '10 at 0:22
  • 125
    Javascript sometimes feels like a very cruel joke Jan 4 '15 at 13:47
  • 9
    google can't be wrong
    – caub
    May 29 '16 at 10:04
  • 16
    The fundamental problem is in JS % is not the modulo operator. It's the remainder operator. There is no modulo operator in JavaScript. So the accepted answer is the way to go.
    – Redu
    May 4 '17 at 20:59
  • 1
    Why do nearly no languages implement modulo, given how useful it is?
    – Arnaud
    Jan 14 at 8:39

11 Answers 11

307
Number.prototype.mod = function(n) {
    return ((this%n)+n)%n;
};

Taken from this article: The JavaScript Modulo Bug

20
  • 27
    I don't know that I would call it a "bug". The modulo operation is not very well defined over negative numbers, and different computing environments handle it differently. Wikipedia's article on the modulo operation covers it pretty well. Dec 17 '10 at 4:08
  • 27
    It may seems dumb since it is often called 'modulo', suggesting it would behave the same as its mathematics definition (see ℤ/nℤ algebra), which it does not.
    – etienne
    Apr 25 '13 at 16:41
  • 7
    Why take the modulo before adding n? Why not just add n and then take the modulo?
    – starwed
    Nov 26 '13 at 22:34
  • 17
    @starwed if you didn't use this%n it would fail for x < -n - e.g. (-7 + 5) % 5 === -2 but ((-7 % 5) + 5) % 5 == 3.
    – fadedbee
    Feb 6 '14 at 21:58
  • 9
    I recommend to add to the answer that to access this function one should use the format (-13).mod(10) instead of -13 % 10. It would be more clear.
    – Jp_
    Dec 1 '16 at 10:58
192

Using Number.prototype is SLOW, because each time you use the prototype method your number is wrapped in an Object. Instead of this:

Number.prototype.mod = function(n) {
  return ((this % n) + n) % n;
}

Use:

function mod(n, m) {
  return ((n % m) + m) % m;
}

See: http://jsperf.com/negative-modulo/2

~97% faster than using prototype. If performance is of importance to you of course..

9
  • 1
    Great tip. I took your jsperf and compared with the rest of the solutions in this question (but it seems this is the best anyway): jsperf.com/negative-modulo/3 Oct 12 '13 at 14:16
  • 16
    Micro-optimisation. You'd have to be doing a massive amount of mod calculations for this to make any difference whatsoever. Code what's clearest and most maintainable, then optimise following performance analysis.
    – ChrisV
    Nov 8 '14 at 12:13
  • I think you've got your ns and ms around the wrong way in your second example @StuR . It should be return ((n % m) + m) % m;.
    – vimist
    Mar 16 '15 at 0:44
  • 16
    The motivation stated in this answer is a micro-optimization, yes, but modifying the prototype is problematic. Prefer the approach with the fewest side-effects, which is this one.
    – Keen
    May 8 '18 at 1:47
  • 1
    @JeneralJames The main problem with altering the prototype is namespace collisions. At the end of the day it's just a mutation of global data. Mutating globals is bad practice outside of small throwaway code. Export a function as a trackable dependency. Polyfills as an exception to the rule are irrelevant here. This isn't a polyfill. Real polyfills follow standards which make collisions safe. If you want to argue this in principle, there's a separate question for it. stackoverflow.com/questions/6223449/…
    – Keen
    May 20 at 0:06
33

The % operator in JavaScript is the remainder operator, not the modulo operator (the main difference being in how negative numbers are treated):

-1 % 8 // -1, not 7

5
  • 9
    It should be called the remainder operator but it is called modulus operator: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide/… Oct 21 '13 at 22:54
  • 18
    @DaveKennedy: MDN is not an official language reference, it's a community-edited site which sometimes gets it wrong. The spec does not call it a modulo operator, and as far as I can tell it never has (I went back to ES3). It explicitly says the operator yields the remainder of an implied division, and just calls it "the % operator." Jul 22 '17 at 14:07
  • 2
    If it is called remainder, it must be larger than 0 by definition. Can't you remember the division theorem from high school?! So maybe you can have a look here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclidean_division
    – Ahmad
    Jan 17 '20 at 17:17
  • @Ahmad—it's now called a multiplicative operator.
    – RobG
    Dec 14 '20 at 0:11
  • 1
    "mod" should have been implemented into every language form the start. After 30 years of programming, I --never-- needed a % b when a is negative: every single time, what I needed instead was mod(a,b).
    – Arnaud
    Jan 14 at 8:37
18

A "mod" function to return a positive result.

var mod = function (n, m) {
    var remain = n % m;
    return Math.floor(remain >= 0 ? remain : remain + m);
};
mod(5,22)   // 5
mod(25,22)  // 3
mod(-1,22)  // 21
mod(-2,22)  // 20
mod(0,22)   // 0
mod(-1,22)  // 21
mod(-21,22) // 1

And of course

mod(-13,64) // 51
3
  • 1
    MDN is not an official language reference, it's a community-edited site which sometimes gets it wrong. The spec does not call it a modulo operator, and as far as I can tell it never has (I went back to ES3). It explicitly says the operator yields the remainder of an implied division, and just calls it "the % operator." Jul 22 '17 at 14:09
  • 1
    Oops, the link you specified actually references #sec-applying-the-mod-operator right there in the url :) Anyway, thanks for the note, I took the fluff out of my answer, it's not really important anyway.
    – Shanimal
    Jul 25 '17 at 0:31
  • 4
    @ Shanimal: LOL! It does. An error by the HTML editor. The spec text does not. Jul 25 '17 at 6:34
11

The accepted answer makes me a little nervous because it re-uses the % operator. What if Javascript changes the behavior in the future?

Here is a workaround that does not re-use %:

function mod(a, n) {
    return a - (n * Math.floor(a/n));
}

mod(1,64); // 1
mod(63,64); // 63
mod(64,64); // 0
mod(65,64); // 1
mod(0,64); // 0
mod(-1,64); // 63
mod(-13,64); // 51
mod(-63,64); // 1
mod(-64,64); // 0
mod(-65,64); // 63
8
  • 12
    If javascript changed the modulo operator to match the mathematical definition, the accepted answer would still work.
    – starwed
    Nov 26 '13 at 22:33
  • 23
    "What if Javascript changes the behavior in the future?" - Why would it? Changing the behaviour of such a fundamental operator is not likely.
    – nnnnnn
    Apr 18 '14 at 23:33
  • 2
    +1 for sharing this concern-of & alternative-to the featured answer #answer-4467559 &for 4 reasons: (1) Why it states,& yes“Changing the behaviour of such a fundamental op is not likely” but still prudent to consider even to find it's not needed. (2) defining a working op in terms of a broken one, while impressive, is worrysome at least on 1st look, at is should be til shown not (3) tho I hvnt well-verified this alternative, I find easer to follow on quick look. (4)tiny: it uses 1 div+1 mul instead of 2 (mod) divs& I've heard on MUCH earlier hardware w/o a good FPU,multiplication was faster. May 7 '15 at 23:33
  • 2
    @DestinyArchitect it's not prudent, it's pointless. If they were to change the behaviour of the remainder operator, it would break a good range of programs using it. That's never going to happen.
    – Aegis
    Feb 2 '16 at 23:16
  • 15
    What if the behavior of -, *, /, ;, ., (, ), ,, Math.floor, function or return changes? Then your code is horribly broken.
    – xehpuk
    Feb 6 '18 at 22:19
6

If x is an integer and n is a power of 2, you can use x & (n - 1) instead of x % n.

> -13 & (64 - 1)
51 
4

Though it isn't behaving as you expected, it doesn't mean that JavaScript is not 'behaving'. It is a choice JavaScript made for its modulo calculation. Because, by definition either answer makes sense.

See this from Wikipedia. You can see on the right how different languages chose the result's sign.

2

So it seems that if you're trying to mod around degrees (so that if you have -50 degrees - 200 degrees), you'd want to use something like:

function modrad(m) {
    return ((((180+m) % 360) + 360) % 360)-180;
}
0
1

I deal with négative a and negative n too

 //best perf, hard to read
   function modul3(a,n){
        r = a/n | 0 ;
        if(a < 0){ 
            r += n < 0 ? 1 : -1
        }
        return a - n * r 
    }
    // shorter code
    function modul(a,n){
        return  a%n + (a < 0 && Math.abs(n)); 
    }

    //beetween perf and small code
    function modul(a,n){
        return a - n * Math[n > 0 ? 'floor' : 'ceil'](a/n); 
    }
1

This is not a bug, there's 3 functions to calculate modulo, you can use the one which fit your needs (I would recommend to use Euclidean function)

Truncating the decimal part function

console.log(  41 %  7 ); //  6
console.log( -41 %  7 ); // -6
console.log( -41 % -7 ); // -6
console.log(  41 % -7 ); //  6

Integer part function

Number.prototype.mod = function(n) {
    return ((this%n)+n)%n;
};

console.log( parseInt( 41).mod( 7) ); //  6
console.log( parseInt(-41).mod( 7) ); //  1
console.log( parseInt(-41).mod(-7) ); // -6
console.log( parseInt( 41).mod(-7) ); // -1

Euclidean function

Number.prototype.mod = function(n) {
    var m = ((this%n)+n)%n;
    return m < 0 ? m + Math.abs(n) : m;
};

console.log( parseInt( 41).mod( 7) ); // 6
console.log( parseInt(-41).mod( 7) ); // 1
console.log( parseInt(-41).mod(-7) ); // 1
console.log( parseInt( 41).mod(-7) ); // 6
6
  • 1
    In euclidian function checking m < 0 is useless because ((this%n)+n)%n is always positive
    – bormat
    May 5 '16 at 9:07
  • 1
    @bormat Yes it is, but in Javascript % can return negative results (an this is the purpose of these functions, to fix it)
    – zessx
    May 6 '16 at 12:21
  • you wrote this [code] Number.prototype.mod = function(n) { var m = ((this%n)+n)%n; return m < 0 ? m + Math.abs(n) : m; }; [/code] give me one value of n where m is négative. they are no value of n where m is négative because you add n after the first % .
    – bormat
    May 7 '16 at 14:47
  • Without this check, parseInt(-41).mod(-7) would return -6 instead of 1 (and this is exactly the purpose of the Integer part function I wrote)
    – zessx
    May 7 '16 at 19:30
  • 1
    You can simplify your function by removing the second modulo Number.prototype.mod = function(n) { var m = this%n; return (m < 0) ? m + Math.abs(n) : m; };
    – bormat
    May 7 '16 at 20:07
0

There is a NPM package that will do the work for you. You can install it with the following command.

npm install just-modulo --save

Usage copied from the README

import modulo from 'just-modulo';

modulo(7, 5); // 2
modulo(17, 23); // 17
modulo(16.2, 3.8); // 17
modulo(5.8, 3.4); //2.4
modulo(4, 0); // 4
modulo(-7, 5); // 3
modulo(-2, 15); // 13
modulo(-5.8, 3.4); // 1
modulo(12, -1); // NaN
modulo(-3, -8); // NaN
modulo(12, 'apple'); // NaN
modulo('bee', 9); // NaN
modulo(null, undefined); // NaN

GitHub repository can be found via the following link:

https://github.com/angus-c/just/tree/master/packages/number-modulo

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