1

I have a treeBuild function does not get compiled, because the signature in the where clause:

unfold :: (a -> Maybe (a,b,a)) -> a -> BinaryTree b
unfold f x = case f x of Nothing -> Leaf
                         Just (s,t,u) -> Node (unfold f s) t (unfold f u)

treeBuild :: Integer -> BinaryTree Integer
treeBuild n = unfold f 0
    where f :: a -> Maybe (a,b,a)
          f x
              | x == n = Nothing
              | otherwise = Just (x+1, x, x+1)        

and I've got following compiler error:

* Couldn't match expected type `a' with actual type `Integer'
  `a' is a rigid type variable bound by
    the type signature for:
      f :: forall a b. a -> Maybe (a, b, a)
    at D:\haskell\chapter12\src\Small.hs:85:16
* In the second argument of `(==)', namely `n'
  In the expression: x == n
  In a stmt of a pattern guard for
                 an equation for `f':
    x == n
* Relevant bindings include
    x :: a (bound at D:\haskell\chapter12\src\Small.hs:86:13)
    f :: a -> Maybe (a, b, a)
      (bound at D:\haskell\chapter12\src\Small.hs:86:11)

What is wrong with signature of f?

  • 3
    How could you compare x :: a to n :: Integer without a being Integer or at least having some known constraint? Or instead of the rhetorical question: == is of type a -> a -> Bool so if one of them is an integer then both of them should be. – Thomas M. DuBuisson Jun 21 '17 at 13:52
8

The error

In your program you write:

treeBuild :: Integer -> BinaryTree Integer
treeBuild n = unfold f 0
    where f :: a -> Maybe (a,b,a)
          f x
              | x == n = Nothing
              | otherwise = Just (x+1, x, x+1)

So that means that you want to check the equality between an Integer and an a. But (==) has type signature: (==) :: Eq a => a -> a -> Bool. So that means in Haskell the two operands should have the same type.

You thus have two options: (1) you specify the f function, or (2) you generalize the treeBuild function.

Specialize the f function

treeBuild :: Integer -> BinaryTree Integer
treeBuild n = unfold f 0
    where f :: Integer -> Maybe (Integer,Integer,Integer)
          f x
              | x == n = Nothing
              | otherwise = Just (x+1, x, x+1)

Here we simply make f a function f :: Integer -> Maybe (Integer,Integer,Integer).

Generalize the treeBuild function

We can - and this is more recommended - generalize the treeBuild function (and slightly specialize the f function):

treeBuild :: (Num a, Eq a) => a -> BinaryTree a
treeBuild n = unfold f 0
    where f x
              | x == n = Nothing
              | otherwise = Just (x+1, x, x+1)

Then f will have the type f :: (Num a, Eq a) => a -> Maybe (a,a,a).

Since now we can build trees for any type that is a numerical type and supports equality.

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  • In my example, the variable a has no type, that because it does not work right? I did not clarify the type of a. – zero_coding Jun 21 '17 at 14:04
  • a is not a variable, it is a type variable. You do not have to clarify the type of a in order to define a function. Haskell can derive the concrete types when you call a function itself. – Willem Van Onsem Jun 21 '17 at 14:05
  • OK yes, sorry. So the type variable a has not assigned to a type yet, that because it does not work right? – zero_coding Jun 21 '17 at 14:07
  • @zero_coding: well you specify an f, but in the scope of treeBuild. So that means that you specify a "free a" so to speak, and that conflicts with the unfold call. – Willem Van Onsem Jun 21 '17 at 14:08
  • Could you please show me another example of "free a"? Or what do you mean with "free a"? – zero_coding Jun 21 '17 at 14:14

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