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I have a code base which I want to push to GitHub as open source. In this git-controlled source tree, I have certain configuration files which contain passwords. I made sure not to track this file and I also added it to the .gitignore file. However, I want to be absolutely positive that no sensitive information is going to be pushed, perhaps if something slipped in-between commits or something. I doubt I was careless enough to do this, but I want to be positive.

Is there a way to "grep" all of git? I know that sounds weird, but by "all" I guess I mean every version of very file that ever was. I guess if there is a command that dumps the diff file for every commit, that might work?

marked as duplicate by user456814, random, uthark, sandrstar, Sebastian Sep 6 '13 at 5:54

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  • it's limited in that it'll only search a single branch (master?), but it's pretty close to what you want github.com/divinity76/SearchGithubHistory.js/blob/master/… / – hanshenrik Jan 23 '15 at 13:12
  • Notwithstanding the 'Correct Answers', your requirement is to check that certain information is not committed publicly - the 'git' answer is only relevant since you are committing the whole history. Of course if you only commit the current revision, without history (use eg. "git archive"), then a simple 'grep' will suffice. – MikeW Jul 20 '16 at 12:28
up vote 891 down vote accepted

Git can search diffs with the -S option (it's called pickaxe in the docs)

git log -Spassword

This will find any commit that added or removed the string password. Here a few options:

  • -p: will show the diffs. If you provide a file (-p file), it will generate a patch for you.
  • -G: looks for differences whose added or removed line matches the given regexp, as opposed to -S, which "looks for differences that introduce or remove an instance of string".
  • --all: searches over all branches and tags; alternatively, use --branches[=<pattern>] or --tags[=<pattern>]
  • 3
    If something does wind up committed, is there an easy way to remove it? Let's assume in this scenario there's a config file that I want to keep, but one line contains a password, which I want to remove from all of my git history. Any simple way to do that without rewriting every commit? – Matt D Jan 28 '13 at 1:12
  • 2
    @MattD Yes, git rebase -i <commit> will do the trick. Relevant question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4963261/can-i-rebase-old-commits – Erik B Jan 30 '13 at 11:52
  • 2
    hi, git log -Gpassword --all, how to add condition to only search for some file(giving a regex to filter filename+filepath) – atian25 Aug 22 '13 at 1:02
  • 4
    In this particular case I'd also throw in a -i to make the search case insensitive. – dain Oct 15 '15 at 10:58
  • 4
    Just an FYI, the above command didn't really work for me. I did the following: git log -p -S <YOUR_SEARCH_TERM> I stole this info from this informative article about git pickaxe. – Dropped.on.Caprica Feb 18 '16 at 20:56
git rev-list --all | (
    while read revision; do
        git grep -F 'password' $revision
    done
)
  • 9
    +1: I would have done "for revision in `git rev-list --all`; do git grep… done", but your approach is more reactive, as it greps while the revisions are being found. – Eric Lebigot Dec 17 '10 at 9:01
  • 1
    Is it possible to use this on a remote repository (like github)? – studgeek Mar 16 '11 at 0:32
  • 1
    @reesd: Only if you clone it, of course. – cdhowie Mar 22 '11 at 6:01
  • In order to avoid seeing matches from vendor/cache/ and public/assets/, change the grep line in this answer to: git grep -F 'password' $revision | grep -v ':vendor/cache/' | grep -v ':public/assets/' – user664833 Jan 20 '12 at 18:47

Try the following commands to search the string inside all previous tracked files:

git log --patch  | less +/searching_string

or

git rev-list --all | GIT_PAGER=cat xargs git grep 'search_string'

which needs to be run from the parent directory where you'd like to do the searching.

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