7

I want a type to describe a set of strings, and an object with keys for easy access to said strings.

Option 1 (doesn't provide proper type inferencing)

When const TwoWords is initialized with all of the keys' values type-asserted to TwoWords, then DoSomething(TwoWords.Foo) compiles, but the typeguard on the switch statement doesn't work as expected - the type of word in the default case is not never.

type TwoWords = 'foo' | 'bar';
const TwoWords = {
    Foo: 'foo' as TwoWords,
    Bar: 'bar' as TwoWords
};

function DoSomething(word: TwoWords) {
    switch (word) {
        case TwoWords.Foo:
            break;
        case TwoWords.Bar:
            break;
        default:
            let typeInferenceCheck: never = word; // Type '"foo"' is not assignable to type 'never'
    }
}

DoSomething(TwoWords.Foo);
DoSomething('bar');

Option 2 (correct type inference, but overly verbose)

However, if I use a string literal type assertion for each of TwoWords keys' values, the type of word in the default case is never as I would expect.

type TwoWords = 'foo' | 'bar';
const TwoWords = {
    Foo: 'foo' as 'foo',
    Bar: 'bar' as 'bar'
};

function DoSomething(word: TwoWords) {
    switch (word) {
        case TwoWords.Foo:
            break;
        case TwoWords.Bar:
            break;
        default:
            let typeInferenceCheck: never = word; // OK
    }
}

DoSomething(TwoWords.Foo);
DoSomething('bar');

In cases where 'foo' and 'bar' are much longer strings (say, a whole sentence), I don't want to duplicate them - it's too verbose. Is there another way to have a string keyed enum that behaves as expected from a type-inference perspective in a switch statement (or if/else chain)?

Option 3 (not interchangeable with string literals)

As per Madara Uchiha's answer, you can get proper type inference (as in Option 2) without the verbosity using TypeScript 2.4 string enums, but these aren't interchangeable with string literals.

DoSomething('bar'); // Type '"bar"' is not assignable to parameter of type 'TwoWords'

(See GitHub issue #15930 about string literal assignment to TypeScript 2.4 string enum)

Criteria

I am looking for another option which allows me to have:

  1. An enum-style object for accessing string literals EnumLikeObject.Foo === 'foo'
  2. A type indicating that only enum members are allowed, whether they are:
    1. string literals - let thing: EnumLikeObject = 'foo'
    2. properties of the enum-style object - let thing: EnumLikeObject = EnumLikeObject.Foo
  3. the enum-style object and the type must have the same name
  4. In the declaration of the enum-style object and the type, no string literal may be repeated more than twice. If you've got a solution where they must only be repeated once, even better. (In this question, when I speak of verbosity, this criteria is primarily what I'm referring to.)

Objections & Discussion

  • issue #15930 link from Option 3 about string enums and string literals says "The rational here is if you use string enums, you should use them all the way to ensure safe refactoring, otherwise stick with literal types"
    • In our project, we use a parsing library for some xml data (we don't control the data format). This gives us a typed object that uses string literal types, which we map to our internally used objects which use these string enums. (Hence the requirement about string literals.) Sometimes, we work the other way from internal object to generating xml, and for ease of use in those cases we want an enum not just literal types.
    • I may look into changing the type definition for that parsing library to use our string enums instead of literals and then I can drop the string literal assignment requirement, but I'd rather avoid that because that library isn't our responsibility and it seems rather hacky to use our internal types from an external library.
  • issue #16389 from @tycho's comment says that "any literal that is not a constant is predicted to change in value, though not in type" which is why you need to tell the compiler if you know that a variable actually won't change in type beyond certain bounds. The compiler must infer the most general type to allow for changes in the value.
5
  • This seems to come down to the ability to get 'foo' inference without having to write 'foo' as 'foo'. This seems the topic of #16389. Commented Jun 26, 2017 at 14:49
  • Thanks for the link @Tycho. Yes, if the type of foo was inferred as 'foo' and not string, that would make my "option 2" less verbose and solve the problem. As explained in that linked GitHub issue, it's an issue of mutability. const foo = 'foo'; does have a type of 'foo', whereas let foo = 'foo' has a type of string; Not sure how to leverage that to solve this though. Any ideas? Commented Jun 26, 2017 at 15:13
  • Hah, I didn't even know that already worked if you're storing the strings with const! So I guess that means what's left is for them to extend that behavior to objects (and arrays). Until then, what if you say const Foo = 'foo'; const Bar = 'bar'; const TwoWords = { Foo, Bar };? Still not perfect but yeah. Commented Jun 26, 2017 at 15:59
  • Surprisingly, that also doesn't work (just tried it). Property Foo has type 'foo', but then TwoWords has type { Foo: string, Bar: string }. Commented Jun 26, 2017 at 17:06
  • 1
    Ouch... maybe subscribe to that issue hoping they'll consider supporting this at one point. I'll fav here too in the event someone comes up with a miracle for the bounty. Commented Jun 27, 2017 at 3:55

2 Answers 2

6

If you care to wait and endure for a bit,

TypeScript 2.4 brings true string enums to the playing field:

enum TwoWords {
  Foo = 'foo',
  Bar = 'bar'
}

function DoSomething(word: TwoWords) {
    switch (word) {
        case TwoWords.Foo:
            break;
        case TwoWords.Bar:
            break;
        default:
            let typeCheck: never = word; // OK
    }
}

That gets you the best of both worlds.

3
  • That's awesome! Yes, I can update to 2.4 and that works -- almost. It's not actually enough though, because I need to be able to assign string literals to variables typed with this string keyed enum. I did mention that in point 2 of my requirements, but I can see how it wasn't entirely clear. I updated the examples to include DoSomething('bar') which doesn't work with TypeScript 2.4 string keyed enums. Any suggestions? Commented Jun 21, 2017 at 22:01
  • Huh, that actually seems like a bug in TypeScript, I'd expect it to work... Commented Jun 22, 2017 at 6:45
  • Unfortunately, it seems to be by design and not a bug. Commented Jun 23, 2017 at 14:00
2
+200

I think I got it. At least:

  • I'm not seeing any red underlines in my code.
  • DoSomething accepts either "foo" or "bar".
  • In the default case, word is void.

And to satisfy your criteria

  1. TwoWords.Foo === 'foo'
  2. The type only allows the literal values specified.
  3. the enum-style object and the type have the same name
  4. The string literals are only written once

And so without further ado:

const TwoWords = (function () {
    const Foo = 'foo';
    const Bar = 'bar';

    const ret = {
        Foo: Foo as typeof Foo,
        Bar: Bar as typeof Bar,
    };
    return ret;
})()
type TwoWords = typeof TwoWords[keyof typeof TwoWords];

And then I had a light bulb moment

namespace TwoWords2 {
    export const Foo = "foo";
    export const Bar = "bar";
}
type TwoWords2 = typeof TwoWords2[keyof typeof TwoWords2]
// didn't test this, not sure if it actually updates the 
// original object or just returns a frozen copy
Object.freeze(TwoWords2); 

It's not a downside, in my opinion, because it still throws an error in the type checker and in VS Code, but TwoWords2.Bar = "five" actually works because the namespace gets compiled to a simple object. But that's the way typescript works. Obviously the first code also has that problem, but it wouldn't throw a type error, so the second is superior, IMO.

9
  • That's beautiful Commented Jun 27, 2017 at 13:38
  • It looks like let thing = TwoWords.Bar; DoSomething(thing); doesn't work with this solution, but it does with "option 2" from my question - but I don't think there's any way to get around that. let thing = 'bar'; DoSomething(thing); also doesn't work as per issue #16389 Commented Jun 27, 2017 at 14:01
  • Honestly, you shouldn't be assigning a literal type to a let variable. What happens if you change it later? You'll end up with "foo" as "bar"! If you use const it will carry over the way you want it to. const thing = TwoWords.Bar; DoSomething(thing); Commented Jun 27, 2017 at 14:06
  • If you literally want to do that, then you have to tell typescript that's what you want: let me: typeof TwoWords2.Bar = TwoWords2.Bar;. But I don't recommend it because you'll risk breaking your type checking, and const works perfectly fine. Commented Jun 27, 2017 at 14:11
  • 1
    Yes, exactly. And that's what they say in issue #16389 - if you know that it's something more specific than just a string, you'll need to explicitly tell the compiler. Thanks for the help Commented Jun 27, 2017 at 14:14

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