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I currently trying to use a glm to create a dose response curve. I am able to create the curve using the bio nominal family and probit function within glm but would like to plot the curves using ggplot and not R's basic plotting functions. When comparing the basic plot to the ggplot the curve produced by ggplot is not correct and I am unsure how make it the same as the basic plot. Additional the confidence intervals are not correct when plotting the curve with ggplot. Thanks for any help.

library(ggplot2)
library(Hmisc)
library(plyr)
library(MASS)



create dataframe: 
#1) column is exposure concentration
#2) column is the total number of organism died over 12 h of exposure to the 
    corresponding concentration 
#3) column is the total number that survived over 12 h to the corresponding 
    concentration
#4) column is the total number of organism exposed to the corresponding 
    concentration
#5) fifth is the percentage of organism that survived exposure at the 
    corresponding concentration 

 conc <- c(0.02, 0.45, 0.46, 0.50, 0.78, 0.80, 0.80, 0.92, 0.93, 1.00, 1.16, 
   1.17, 1.17, 1.48,1.51, 1.55, 1.88, 1.90, 2.02)

 dead <- c(0, 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  7, 11, 4, 14, 14, 12, 12, 18, 17)

 survive <- c(15, 16, 15, 15, 15, 16, 14, 14, 10, 15, 12,  5, 12,  0,  1,  3,  0,  0,  0)

 total <- c(15, 16, 15, 15, 15, 16, 14, 14, 10, 16, 19, 16, 16, 14, 15, 15, 12, 18, 17)

 perc <- c(1.00, 1.00, 1.00, 1.00, 1.00,1.00, 1.00, 1.00, 1.00, 0.94,0.63, 
      0.31,0.75,0.00, 0.07, 0.20, 0.00, 0.00,0.00)

 data<-data.frame(conc,dead,survive,total,perc)
 head(data)
 attach(data)
 #create matrix of dead and survival
 y = cbind(dead,survive)

 #create binomial glm (probit model)
 model.results = glm(data = data, y ~ conc,binomial(link="probit"))
 summary(model.results)



 #use function from MASS to calculate LC
 dose.p(model.results,p=0.5)
 dose.p(model.results,p=c(0.1,0.25,0.5,0.99))

 #plot curve 
 plot(conc,(survive/(survive+dead)), ylab = "Percent Survival", 
 xlab="Concentration ")


 #To make function use the Estimate parameters from the binomial glm 
  used above
  logisticline <- function(z) {eta = -6.7421 + 5.4468 * z;1 / (1 + 
  exp(eta))}
  x <- seq(0,200.02,0.01)
  lines(x,logisticline(x),new = TRUE)




  #plot using ggplot

  ggplot(data, aes(x = conc, y = perc)) +
  geom_point() +
  geom_smooth(method="glm",method.args = list(family = "binomial"))
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  • They're different. Doesn't mean either of them are wrong. Different methods and formulas.
    – M--
    Commented Jun 21, 2017 at 20:33
  • If you want to use the probit link in ggplot, you'll need to use something like family = "binomial"(link = "probit"). You always have the option of adding the model predictions to the dataset and plotting those rather than relying on geom_smooth. Also, why are you using the inverse logit to make a line when you fit a probit regression?
    – aosmith
    Commented Jun 21, 2017 at 21:58
  • @aosmith I tried using family = "binomial"(link = "probit") however under the current version of ggplot additional model arguments have to be passed through method.args which produces the following warning and doesn't change the original graph In eval(expr, envir, enclos) : non-integer #successes in a binomial glm!. I can add the model predictions to the dataset and plot from there instead of relying on geom_smooth. Lastly, I was taught to use survivalship which will result in using the inverse logit compared to using mortality which will just use the logit. Maybe I was taught wrong. Commented Jun 22, 2017 at 0:00

1 Answer 1

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You can draw the fitted line with ggplot2 by making predictions from the model or by fitting the model directly with geom_smooth. To do the latter, you'll need to fit the model with the proportion dead as the response variable with total as the weights instead of using the matrix of successes and failures as the response variable.

Using glm, fitting a model with a proportion plus weights looks like:

# Calculate proportion
data$prop = with(data, dead/total)

# create binomial glm (probit model)
model.results2 = glm(data = data, prop ~ conc, 
                    family = binomial(link="probit"), weights = total)

You can predict with the dataset you have or, to make a smoother line, you can create a new dataset to predict with that has more values of conc as you did.

preddat = data.frame(conc = seq(0, 2.02, .01) )

Now you can predict from the model via predict, using this data.frame as newdata. If you use type = "response", you will get predictions on the data scale via the inverse link. Because you fit a probit model, this will use the inverse probit. In your example you used the inverse logit for predictions.

# Predictions with inverse probit
preddat$pred = predict(model.results2, newdata = preddat, type = "response")
# Predictions with inverse logit (?)
preddat$pred2 = plogis( predict(model.results2, newdata = preddat) )

To fit the probit model in ggplot, you will need to use the proportion as the y variable with weight = total. Here I add the lines from the model predictions so you can see the probit model fit in ggplot gives the same estimated line as the fitted probit model. Using the inverse logit gives you something different, which isn't surprising.

ggplot(data, aes(conc, prop) ) +
     geom_smooth(method = "glm", method.args = list(family = binomial(link = "probit") ), 
                 aes(weight = total, color = "geom_smooth line"), se = FALSE) +
     geom_line(data = preddat, aes(y = pred, color = "Inverse probit") ) +
     geom_line(data = preddat, aes(y = pred2, color = "Inverse logit" ) )

enter image description here

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  • Thank you for your help as I was able to make it work. What you did makes perfect sense. Thank you again :) Commented Jun 22, 2017 at 15:45
  • @BenjaminHlina If this answered your question, you can accept it by clicking on the check mark beside the answer.
    – aosmith
    Commented Jun 22, 2017 at 15:48

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