1

In Windows, I have some threads. Two of them terminate with exception (null pointer dereference, for example). I have SetUnhandledExceptionFilter(...) which starts dump generating on the first exception. On the second exception, the whole program dies. Is there any way to handle such situations? All critical errors except first shall be ignored.

pseudo code:

  void job()
  {
   ...
   RaiseException(someCode, someFlags, 0, nullptr); // or doing something wrong, like nullptr dereference
  }

  int main() {
    SetUnhandledExceptionFilter(getDump);
    std::thread t1(job), t2(job); 
    ...
  }

UPD: replace misunderstanded string *nullptr = 0xbad;

UPD2: forget about nullptr

UPD3: so far i came to this workaround

#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>  // for EXCEPTION_ACCESS_VIOLATION
#include <excpt.h>

#include <mutex>


LONG __stdcall HandleException(EXCEPTION_POINTERS* exinfo)
{
    static HANDLE mutex = CreateMutex(nullptr, FALSE, __TEXT("HandleException"));
    while(WaitForSingleObject(mutex, INFINITE) != WAIT_OBJECT_0);

    HANDLE event = CreateEvent(nullptr, TRUE, FALSE, __TEXT("Doing Dump"));
    puts("Doing Dump");
    WaitForSingleObject(event, 5000); // do dump routine
    puts("Done Dump");

    return EXCEPTION_EXECUTE_HANDLER;
}

int filter(unsigned int code, struct _EXCEPTION_POINTERS *ep)
{
    puts("in filter.");
    return HandleException(ep);
}

void Job()
{
    puts("hello");
    int *p = 0x00000000;  // pointer to NULL
    *p = 13;  // causes an access violation exception;
}

void safeJob(void (*job)())
{
    __try {
         job();
    } __except (filter(GetExceptionCode(), GetExceptionInformation())) {
        exit(-1);
    }
}
int main()
{

    SetUnhandledExceptionFilter(HandleException);
    std::thread t1(std::bind(safeJob, Job));
    std::thread t2(std::bind(safeJob, Job));
    t1.join();
    t2.join();
    return 0;
}
  • 2
    Sounds like a bug in getDump. Please show your actual code. – Remy Lebeau Jun 22 '17 at 15:20
  • nullptr dereference does not necessarily throw an exception, it's undefined behavior. – François Andrieux Jun 22 '17 at 15:24
  • I'm not aware of any system where dereferencing nullptr throws an exception. It either crashes with a segfault or does nothing (though it can do anything as it's UB). – Kevin Jun 22 '17 at 15:28
  • 1
    Dereferencing a std::nullptr_t is a compile error, should be something like *(int*)nullptr = 0xbad – Passer By Jun 22 '17 at 16:12
  • 3
    @Kevin: That system is called "Windows". The winapi tag should have hinted that. Actually, this system is called Intel x86. What you call "segfault" on Intel (and compatibles) is the CPU generating an exception (GPF if I recall correctly), and Windows actually keeps that terminology. – conio Jun 22 '17 at 18:14
3

Per Remy's comment, an access violation is a Windows "Structured Exception," not a C++ exception, and it can be handled with Microsoft-specific extensions such as a try-except statement.

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s58ftw19.aspx

Example:

__try
{
 // doing something wrong
 *nullptr = 0xbad;
}
__except(EXCEPTION_EXECUTE_HANDLER)
{
  // exception quashed!
}
  • 1
    Could you add an explanation to this answer? – Kevin Jun 22 '17 at 16:44
  • 3
    On Windows, dereferencing a NULL pointer raises an SEH EXCEPTION_ACCESS_VIOLATION exception, not a C++ exception. __try/__except can be used to handle SEH exceptions. See Structured Exception Handling on MSDN for more details. – Remy Lebeau Jun 22 '17 at 18:31
0

There is a misconception that "doing something bad" will throw exceptions. That is not correct. If you are doing things that are causes for undefined behavior, you should not expect any predictable behavior. If your platform throws an exception, that's great but realize that you can't count on it.

Your best bet is to avoid writing such code.

More on undefined behavior can be found at Undefined, unspecified and implementation-defined behavior.

  • 1
    Exactly right. C++ is not Java. – jschultz410 Jun 22 '17 at 15:38
  • 2
    In general terms, this is good advice, but it doesn't really apply to the OPs case, because he already knows he is getting an exception and is trying to troubleshoot the problem. – Harry Johnston Jun 22 '17 at 23:53
  • Yes, exactly. Null pointer dereference caused by access to zero size container, not by doing that explicitly – user5821508 Jun 23 '17 at 7:20
  • The programming language (C++) makes no guarantees about what should happen, if a program dereferences a nullptr. The platform (Windows), on the other hand, does. It predictably raises an access violation exception. – IInspectable Jun 23 '17 at 7:45
0

*nullptr = 0xbad;

You've caused undefined behavior. You can't even expect that code before this has run correctly. Undefined behavior can have effects in time before it's hit due to compiler optimizations and the rights it has to assume UB won't happen.

There is zero way to protect yourself from UB. You have to implement code standards that discourage or eliminate the possibility for the kinds of errors that cause it. That is the only thing you can do to protect yourself from UB--don't create it.

This is why every team should have a language lawyer who can tell what's UB. The effects of UB can be very off the wall and happen clear across the program at some later or previous date. This person should be familiar with modern, idiomatic C++ and in charge of creating, or at least playing a huge advisory roll, to the teams creation of coding standards.

Second requirement should be implementation lawyer. Someone who can tell you what to expect from UB. This is a much more advanced...more wizardry than science kind of thing. What they know doesn't always work that way and the domain of UB activity is HUGE! These guys don't grow on trees--I don't qualify except at a very minimalistic level.

  • 2
    I've only heard about legends of these UB gurus – Passer By Jun 22 '17 at 16:14
  • 2
    In general terms, this is good advice, but it doesn't really apply to the OPs case, because he already knows he is getting an exception and is trying to troubleshoot the problem. – Harry Johnston Jun 22 '17 at 23:53
  • 1
    More to the point, he knows he is getting a "Structured Exception" - Which is a winapi thing, NOT a c++ exception. – Chris Becke Jun 23 '17 at 5:46
  • 1
    The programming language (C++) makes no guarantees about what should happen, if a program dereferences a nullptr. The platform (Windows), on the other hand, does. It predictably raises an access violation exception. – IInspectable Jun 23 '17 at 7:47
  • 1
    @IInspectable, but it doesn't exhibit predictable and reliable behavior on Windows. For example, a Windows compiler could still behave in the way described here. The first example shows a case where you would expect an exception and not get one; the second example shows a case where you would get an exception you weren't expecting. (Visual Studio 2015, in release mode, does the former, but there's no rule that says a Windows compiler can't do the latter either.) – Harry Johnston Jun 26 '17 at 21:15

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