11

I have a number of classes with code like this. Each __init__ starts a thread and a logger with the name of the class. How do I get the name of the current class in its own definition, as a string, inside __init__? Note that self may not be an instance of the current class, so the following is not quite foolproof.

from threading import Thread
import logging

def myClassName(myclass):
    myclass._class_name = myclass.__name__
    return myclass

@myClassName
class SomeClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        class_name = type(self)._class_name
        print "My class name in __init__ is", class_name
        self.thread = Thread(name=class_name)
        self.logger = logging.getLogger(class_name)

Update:

To clarify:

  • I want the name of the class being defined, not the class of the object passed in.
  • I don't want to hard code the name of the class.
  • I want to make it easy to copy/paste an example from one script to
    another, and the fewer mentions of the unique class name, the better. (Inheritance isn't really efficient, as there are enough custom differences to make it awkward. But accidentally leaving in the name of the wrong class is a hard bug to find.)
10
  • 7
    In what case would self of the __init__ method not be an instance of the current class? Jun 22, 2017 at 17:23
  • Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/510972/…
    – Robᵩ
    Jun 22, 2017 at 17:24
  • @CoryKramer for example, you defined def __init__(potato, self='haha!'): ...
    – wim
    Jun 22, 2017 at 17:26
  • 3
    @wim I think it's fair to assume that self is shorthand for "first argument to the method" Jun 22, 2017 at 17:27
  • 1
    So, given your comment in Rob's answer, what is the problem with just hard-coding the name in the __init__? Jun 22, 2017 at 17:39

2 Answers 2

11

You can retrieve the name of the class of an an object thus:

obj.__class__.__name__

Example:

class SomeClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("I am a %s"%self.__class__.__name__)

class Derived(SomeClass):
    pass

x = SomeClass()
y = Derived()

Result:

$ python x.py
I am a SomeClass
I am a Derived
8
  • Is your point that self will always refer to an instance of the current class being executed? Jun 22, 2017 at 17:30
  • No. In fact I demonstrate the case where self is not an instance of the current class, but rather an instance of a derived class.
    – Robᵩ
    Jun 22, 2017 at 17:31
  • Well that is what I mean actually when I said "current class". Yes I did word that some oddly. Jun 22, 2017 at 17:32
  • Yes. But this fails, because I want the SomeClass name in both cases. That is, I want the name of the class where the code is defined, not the class of the instance passed in. Jun 22, 2017 at 17:37
  • 3
    @QuantumMechanic you need to disambiguate "the current class being executed" in your actual question, or else people are going to be interpreting it in various different ways. Jun 22, 2017 at 17:38
9

In Python 3 this is pretty straight forward, we can use the __class__ cell variable to get the current class.

In Python 2 we can achieve something similar by injecting class's name in functions globals scope using a metaclass and later cleaning it up.

from functools import wraps
from types import FunctionType


def decorate(func, class_name):
    @wraps(func)
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        sentinel = object()
        actual_value = func.__globals__.get('__class__', sentinel)
        func.__globals__['__class__'] = class_name
        try:
            result = func(*args, **kwargs)
        finally:
            if actual_value is sentinel:
                del func.__globals__['__class__']
            else:
                func.__globals__['__class__'] = actual_value
        return result
    return wrapper


class Meta(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        for k, v in attrs.items():
            if isinstance(v, FunctionType):
                attrs[k] = decorate(v, name)
        return type.__new__(cls, name, bases, attrs)


class A:
    __metaclass__ = Meta
    def func(self):
        print(__class__)
        print('Inside A')


class B(A):
    def func(self):
        print(__class__)
        print('Inside B')
        super(B, self).func()


B().func()

Output:

B
Inside B
A
Inside A

To get the __class__ variable as the class object itself we can make few changes:

def decorate(func, cls):
    @wraps(func)
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        sentinel = object()
        actual_value = func.__globals__.get('__class__', sentinel)
        func.__globals__['__class__'] = cls
        try:
            result = func(*args, **kwargs)
        finally:
            if actual_value is sentinel:
                del func.__globals__['__class__']
            else:
                func.__globals__['__class__'] = actual_value
        return result
    return wrapper


class Meta(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        cls = type.__new__(cls, name, bases, attrs)
        for k, v in attrs.items():
            if isinstance(v, FunctionType):
                setattr(cls, k, decorate(v, cls))
        return cls

Now output would be:

<class '__main__.B'>
Inside B
<class '__main__.A'>
Inside A
5
  • Nice. Can you explain the reasoning for putting the injection logic in the wrapper? Jun 23, 2017 at 9:11
  • Nice. More code than I expected, but it appears to me to solve the problem thoroughly and cleanly. Jun 23, 2017 at 9:40
  • Followup: Can this be genericized to take the name of any function? Here it is func, but the target function might vary (__init__ comes to mind). Jun 23, 2017 at 13:44
  • @QuantumMechanic func is just a variable name I used in the decorator, it will work on any function. Jun 23, 2017 at 18:37
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga Was thinking of keeping things similar to Python 3 as much as possible, hence the __class__ variable. Added another version where __class__ now points to the class itself. Jun 23, 2017 at 18:45

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