21

Why can't we use double pointer to represent two dimensional arrays?

arr[2][5] = {"hello","hai"};
**ptr = arr;

Here why doesn't the double pointer (**ptr) work in this expample?

  • What code have you compiled that's similar to the code in your question? – Steve Jessop Dec 17 '10 at 13:40
  • 2
    Run away from multidimensional arrays (except perhaps small ones). – Alexandre C. Dec 17 '10 at 13:42
  • 2
    @Alexandre C. Multidimensional arrays are simple, useful and efficient. Why would you want to run away from them? – Shahbaz Sep 12 '11 at 12:22
  • 1
    @Shahbaz: they are not simple, and if you don't have C99 they are not useful either since they can't have variable length. – Alexandre C. Sep 12 '11 at 17:58
  • I inverted the question, so that it won't mislead future readers. – Shahbaz Oct 17 '13 at 8:53
52

I'm going to try to draw how

int array[10][6];

and

int **array2 = malloc(10 * sizeof *array2);
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    array2[i] = malloc(6 * sizeof **array2);

look like in the memory and how they are different (And that they can't be cast to each other)

array looks like:

 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
| | | | | | | | | | | | | ..............| | | (10*6 elements of type int)
 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
< first row >< second row> ...

array2 looks like:

 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 
| | | | | | | | | | | (10 elements of type int *)
 - - - - - - - - - - 
 | |     ....      |     _ _ _ _ _ _
 | |                \-->| | | | | | | (6 elements of type int)
 | |                     - - - - - -
 | |
 | |      _ _ _ _ _ _
 |  \ -->| | | | | | | (6 elements of type int)
 |        - - - - - -
 |
 |
 |      _ _ _ _ _ _
  \ -->| | | | | | | (6 elements of type int)
        - - - - - -

When you say array[x][y], it translates into *((int *)array+x*6+y)

While, when you say array2[x][y], it translates into *(*(array2+x)+y) (Note that for array, this formula also works (read to the end of the post, and then the comments)).

That is, a static 2d array is in fact a 1d array with rows put in one line. The index is calculated by the formula row * number_of_columns_in_one_row + column.

A dynamic 2d array, however is just a 1d array of pointers. Each pointer then is dynamically allocated to point to another 1d array. In truth, that pointer could be anything. Could be NULL, or pointing to a single variable, or pointing to another array. And each of those pointers are set individually, so they can have different natures.

If you need to pass the pointer of array somewhere, you can't cast it to int ** (imagine what would happen. The int values of the cells of array are interpreted as pointers and dereferenced -> Bam! Segmentation fault!). You can however think of array as a 1d array of int [6]s; that is a 1d array of elements, with type int [6]. To write that down, you say

int (*p)[6] = array;
  • If array is allocated in memory as such as you've described how does something like this still work? I can understand that array[x][y] translates to *(((int *)array)+x*6+y), but why does *(*(array + i) + j) still work? – Kohányi Róbert Sep 6 '18 at 7:20
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    @KohányiRóbert, That's an excellent point. And in fact for a (not-dynamic) multidimensional array (array in this case), the two are equivalent. You need to pay attention to the type of array in the expression to understand it. First, notice that in *(((int *)array)+x*6+y), I first cast array to int *. This essentially means x*6+y is an index to array of ints. – Shahbaz Sep 18 '18 at 14:55
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    Now when you do *(*(array + i) + j)), you don't change the type of array. What's the type of array? It's int (*)[6]. What's the sizeof of that? It's sizeof(int) * 6. Now *(array + i) then becomes the same as (int[6])((int *)array + i*6) (makes sense?). Indexing that with j becomes *((int *)array + i*6 + j). – Shahbaz Sep 18 '18 at 14:55
9

In C, a two-dimensional array is an array of arrays.

You need a pointer-to-array to refer to it, not a double-pointer:

char array[2][6] = {"hello", "hai"};
char (*p)[6] = array;
//char **x = array;  // doesn't compile.

For a double pointer to refer to "2-dimensional data", it must refer to the first element of an array of pointers. But a 2-dimensional array in C (array of arrays) is not the same thing as an array of pointers, and if you just define a 2-D array, then no corresponding array of pointers exists.

The only similarity between the two is the [][] syntax used to access the data: the data itself is structured quite differently.

8

Having pointer-to-pointer means that each row (or column, if you prefer to think of it that way) can have a different length from the other rows/columns.

You can also represent a 2D array by just a pointer to the start element, and an integer that specifies the number of elements per row/column:

void matrix_set(double *first, size_t row_size, size_t x, size_t y, double value)
{
  first[y * row_size + x] = value;
}
  • 2
    My question is why and how it is working. – Thangaraj Dec 17 '10 at 13:49
3

Making an array of pointers to each row in order to obtain an object that "looks like" a multidimensional array of variable size is an expensive design choice for the sake of syntactic sugar. Don't do it.

The correct way to do a variable-sized multidimensional array is something like:

if (w > SIZE_MAX/sizeof *m/h) goto error;
m = malloc(w * h * sizeof *m);
if (!m) goto error;
...
m[y*w+x] = foo;

If you want it to "look pretty" so you can write m[y][x], you should be using a different language, perhaps C++.

  • 3
    you can use variable-length arrays to let the compiler do the offset computation for you: int (*foo)[cols] = malloc(sizeof *foo * rows) makes it possible to use the familiar foo[i][j] syntax; – Christoph Dec 17 '10 at 16:57
  • @Christoph: Indeed, if you have a C99 compiler, this works. You need to arrange to pass the dimensions properly to any function calls you pass the array to, though. – R.. Dec 17 '10 at 17:23
1

Let's start by talking about legal code. What you've written (assuming a char in front of each declaration) won't compile, for several reasons: you have too many initializers (six char's for arr[0], and its size is 5), and of course, char** p doesn't have a type compatible with char arr[2][5]. Correcting for those problems, we get:

char arr[2][6] = { "hello", "hai" };
char (*p)[6] = arr;

Without any double pointer. If you want to access single characters in the above, you need to specify the element from which they come:

char* pc = *arr;

would work, if you wanted to access characters from the first element in arr.

C++ doesn't have two dimensional arrays. The first definition above defines an array[2] or array[6] of char. The implicite array to pointer conversion results in pointer to array[6] of char. After that, of course, there is no array to pointer conversion, because you no longer have an array.

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