47

Can someone please explain the differences between the following functions:

(function($){
  // can do something like 
  $.fn.function_name = function(x){};

})(jQuery);

Could I use jQuery in the next function?

(function(){

}());

And is the following the same as jquery.ready()?

$(function(){

});

Thanks!

96

(function($){
  // can do something like 
  $.fn.function_name = function(x){};

})(jQuery);

That is self-executing anonymous function that uses $ in argument so that you can use it ($) instead of jQuery inside that function and without the fear of conflicting with other libraries because in other libraries too $ has special meaning. That pattern is especially useful when writing jQuery plugins.

You can write any character there instead of $ too:

(function(j){
  // can do something like 
  j.fn.function_name = function(x){};

})(jQuery);

Here j will automatically catch up jQuery specified at the end (jQuery). Or you can leave out the argument completely but then you will have to use jQuery keyword all around instead of $ with no fear of collision still. So $ is wrapped in the argument for short-hand so that you can write $ instead of jQuery all around inside that function.


(function(){

}());

That is self-executing anonymous function again but with no arguments and runs/calls itself because of () at the end.

That patterns turns out to be extremely useful in some situations. For example, let's say you want to run a piece of code after 500 milli seconds each time, you would naturally go for setInterval.

setInterval(doStuff, 500);

But what if doStuff function takes more than 500 mill-seconds to do what it is doing? You would witness unexpected results but setInterval will keep on calling that function again and again at specified time irrespective of whether doStuff finished.

That is where that pattern comes in and you can do the same thing with setTimeout in combination with self-executing anonymous function and avoid bad setInterval like this:

(function foo(){
   doStuff;

   setTimeout(foo, 500);

})()

This code will also repeat itself again and again with one difference. setTimeout will never get triggered unless doStuff is finished. A much better approach than using bad setInterval.

You can test it here.

Note that you can also write self-executing anonymous function like this:

function(){
  // some code
}();

Using extra braces around (like before function keyword) is simply coding convention and can be seen in Crackford's writings, jQuery and elsewhere.


$(function(){

});

That is short-hand syntax for ready handler:

$(document).ready(function(){

});

More Information:

  • 2
    Note further that jQuery(someFunction) passes the jQuery object as the first argument to the callback. This allows you to do this slightly-safer-but-still-terse version of the document ready handler: jQuery(function($){ ...use $ here without fear of global collision... }); – Phrogz Dec 17 '10 at 16:50
  • Expect for the cause of the setTimeout benefit I personally file this in the 'anti-pattern' category. For the sake of brevity it is not worth losing in code clarity, IDE code assist, and debugging; I'll leave the code shortening to automatic minification tools. – Daniel Sokolowski May 23 '14 at 20:47
  • 1
    function() { /* Some code */ }(); Is actually not valid syntax. – BadHorsie Aug 1 '18 at 10:14
8

I know that this question is old, but I stumbled upon it right now and so may other people. I just wanted to point out that, although Sarfraz's answer is great, it has to be said that no, writing a self-executing, anonymous function within braces is not a coding convention.

function(){
  // some code
}();

Will not work and give out a SyntaxError because the function is being parsed as a FunctionDeclaration, and the function name is not optional in this case.

On the other hand, the Grouping Operator makes sure that the content is evaluated as a FunctionExpression.

See: Explain JavaScript's encapsulated anonymous function syntax

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