I'm trying to use css custom properties together with @page rules, but it does not seem to work. It kind of make sense since css variables cascade and the :root selector and the @page rule don't have a child/parent relationship.

Below is a typical example of what I'd like to do:

:root {
    --page-width: 148.5mm;
    --page-height: 210mm;
}

@page  {
    size: var(--page-width) var(--page-height);
}

Is there any way I could use variables with @page rules?

  • Since @page is its own namespace, did you try @page { :root { --page-width: 148.5mm; } } – LGSon Jun 24 '17 at 12:32
  • Thanks, I'll try that. But then would there be a way to share the same variable between @page, and let's say, a div? – user1415785 Jun 24 '17 at 12:48
  • I don't think you can share between namespace's. Are you aware of that you can use @media query to set css rules when print? – LGSon Jun 24 '17 at 12:56
  • 1
    @LGSon: You can't change the dimensions of a page using style rules, regardless of the media type. That's why the page at-rule exists. – BoltClock Jun 24 '17 at 16:38
  • @BoltClock Thanks for that note – LGSon Jun 24 '17 at 16:42
up vote 2 down vote accepted

css variables cascade and the :root selector and the @page rule don't have a child/parent relationship.

@page rules cascade, too. And the page context does actually inherit from the root element, which means not only do @page rules cascade, but they participate in the same cascade as style rules. But since this wasn't in the spec a decade ago, implementations where the page context doesn't inherit from the root element are still conformant to the spec.

While this means you shouldn't rely on @page rules inheriting custom properties from :root, it does also mean that @page itself accepts custom properties, essentially making inheritance a non-issue. So, the following is expected to work, but it doesn't — it seems that every browser fails to create the custom properties:

@page {
    --page-width: 148.5mm;
    --page-height: 210mm;
    size: var(--page-width) var(--page-height);
}

Interestingly, Firefox and Chrome have no trouble parsing and computing var() expressions with fallback values in @page style declarations, while Microsoft Edge fails to do so, which means the following will result in each page having 25mm margins in Firefox and Chrome:

@page {
    --page-margin: 50mm;
    margin: var(--page-margin, 25mm);
}

So, in short, custom properties in @page rules don't work — not because the spec doesn't allow it, but because every browser's implementation of custom properties is incomplete.

  • Thanks, that's clear! – user1415785 Jun 25 '17 at 8:53

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.