12

I am trying to read 12-bit binary files containing images (a video) using Python 3.

To read a similar file but encoded in 16 bits, the following works very well:

import numpy as np
images = np.memmap(filename_video, dtype=np.uint16, mode='r', shape=(nb_frames, height, width))

where filename_video is the file and nb_frames, height, and width characteristics of the video that can be read from another file. By 'working very well' I mean fast: reading a 640x256 video that has 140 frames takes about 1 ms on my computer.

As far as I know I cannot use this when the file is encoded in 12 bits because there is no uint12 type. So what I am trying to do is to read a 12-bit file and store it in a 16-bit uint array. The following, taken from (Python: reading 12 bit packed binary image), works:

with open(filename_video, 'rb') as f:
    data=f.read()
images=np.zeros(int(2*len(data)/3),dtype=np.uint16)
ii=0
for jj in range(0,int(len(data))-2,3):
    a=bitstring.Bits(bytes=data[jj:jj+3],length=24)
    images[ii],images[ii+1] = a.unpack('uint:12,uint:12')
    ii=ii+2
images = np.reshape(images,(nb_frames,height,width))

However, this is very slow: reading a 640x256 video thas has only 5 frames takes about 11.5 s with my machine. Ideally I would like to be able to read 12-bit files as efficiently as I can read 8 or 16-bit files using memmap. Or at least not 10^5 times slower. How could I speed things up ?

Here is a file example: http://s000.tinyupload.com/index.php?file_id=26973488795334213426 (nb_frames=5, height=256, width=640).

1
  • that's very cool (+1). I only knew about like OpenCV's cv.cvtColor(bayer,rgb,cv.COLOR_BayerBG2BGR) Apr 17, 2020 at 0:17

4 Answers 4

17

I have a slightly different implementation from the one proposed by @max9111 that doesn't require a call to unpackbits.

It creates two uint12 values from three consecutive uint8 directly by cutting the middle byte in half and using numpy's binary operations. In the following, data_chunks is assumed to be a binary string containing the information for an arbitrary number number of 12-bit integers (hence its length must be a multiple of 3).

def read_uint12(data_chunk):
    data = np.frombuffer(data_chunk, dtype=np.uint8)
    fst_uint8, mid_uint8, lst_uint8 = np.reshape(data, (data.shape[0] // 3, 3)).astype(np.uint16).T
    fst_uint12 = (fst_uint8 << 4) + (mid_uint8 >> 4)
    snd_uint12 = ((mid_uint8 % 16) << 8) + lst_uint8
    return np.reshape(np.concatenate((fst_uint12[:, None], snd_uint12[:, None]), axis=1), 2 * fst_uint12.shape[0])

I benchmarked with the other implementation and this approach proved to be ~4x faster on a ~5 Mb input:
read_uint12_unpackbits 65.5 ms ± 1.11 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each) read_uint12 14 ms ± 513 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

10

One way to speedup the numpy-vectorized methods is to avoid costly memory allocations for temporary data, use cache more efficently and make use of parallelization. This can be quite easily be done using Numba, Cython or C. Please note that the parallelization is not always beneficial. If the array you want to convert is too small, use the single threaded version (parallel=False)

Numba version of Cyril Gaudefroy answer with temporary memory allocation

import numba as nb
import numpy as np
@nb.njit(nb.uint16[::1](nb.uint8[::1]),fastmath=True,parallel=True)
def nb_read_uint12(data_chunk):
  """data_chunk is a contigous 1D array of uint8 data)
  eg.data_chunk = np.frombuffer(data_chunk, dtype=np.uint8)"""
  
  #ensure that the data_chunk has the right length
  assert np.mod(data_chunk.shape[0],3)==0
  
  out=np.empty(data_chunk.shape[0]//3*2,dtype=np.uint16)
  
  for i in nb.prange(data_chunk.shape[0]//3):
    fst_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3])
    mid_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3+1])
    lst_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3+2])
    
    out[i*2] =   (fst_uint8 << 4) + (mid_uint8 >> 4)
    out[i*2+1] = ((mid_uint8 % 16) << 8) + lst_uint8
    
  return out

Numba version of Cyril Gaudefroy answer with memory preallocation

If you apply this function multiple times on data-chunks of simmilar size you can preallocate the output array only once.

@nb.njit(nb.uint16[::1](nb.uint8[::1],nb.uint16[::1]),fastmath=True,parallel=True,cache=True)
def nb_read_uint12_prealloc(data_chunk,out):
    """data_chunk is a contigous 1D array of uint8 data)
    eg.data_chunk = np.frombuffer(data_chunk, dtype=np.uint8)"""

    #ensure that the data_chunk has the right length
    assert np.mod(data_chunk.shape[0],3)==0
    assert out.shape[0]==data_chunk.shape[0]//3*2

    for i in nb.prange(data_chunk.shape[0]//3):
        fst_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3])
        mid_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3+1])
        lst_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3+2])

        out[i*2] =   (fst_uint8 << 4) + (mid_uint8 >> 4)
        out[i*2+1] = ((mid_uint8 % 16) << 8) + lst_uint8

    return out

Numba version of DGrifffith answer with temporary memory allocation

@nb.njit(nb.uint16[::1](nb.uint8[::1]),fastmath=True,parallel=True,cache=True)
def read_uint12_var_2(data_chunk):
    """data_chunk is a contigous 1D array of uint8 data)
    eg.data_chunk = np.frombuffer(data_chunk, dtype=np.uint8)"""

    #ensure that the data_chunk has the right length
    assert np.mod(data_chunk.shape[0],3)==0

    out=np.empty(data_chunk.shape[0]//3*2,dtype=np.uint16)

    for i in nb.prange(data_chunk.shape[0]//3):
        fst_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3])
        mid_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3+1])
        lst_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3+2])

        out[i*2] =   (fst_uint8 << 4) + (mid_uint8 >> 4)
        out[i*2+1] = (lst_uint8 << 4) + (15 & mid_uint8)

    return out

Numba version of DGrifffith answer with memory preallocation

@nb.njit(nb.uint16[::1](nb.uint8[::1],nb.uint16[::1]),fastmath=True,parallel=True,cache=True)
def read_uint12_var_2_prealloc(data_chunk,out):
    """data_chunk is a contigous 1D array of uint8 data)
    eg.data_chunk = np.frombuffer(data_chunk, dtype=np.uint8)"""

    #ensure that the data_chunk has the right length
    assert np.mod(data_chunk.shape[0],3)==0
    assert out.shape[0]==data_chunk.shape[0]//3*2

    for i in nb.prange(data_chunk.shape[0]//3):
        fst_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3])
        mid_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3+1])
        lst_uint8=np.uint16(data_chunk[i*3+2])

        out[i*2] =   (fst_uint8 << 4) + (mid_uint8 >> 4)
        out[i*2+1] = (lst_uint8 << 4) + (15 & mid_uint8)

    return out

Timings

num_Frames=10
data_chunk=np.random.randint(low=0,high=255,size=np.int(640*256*1.5*num_Frames),dtype=np.uint8)

%timeit read_uint12_gaud(data_chunk)
#11.3 ms ± 53.4 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
#435 MB/s

%timeit nb_read_uint12(data_chunk)
#939 µs ± 24.3 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
#5235 MB/s

out=np.empty(data_chunk.shape[0]//3*2,dtype=np.uint16)
%timeit nb_read_uint12_prealloc(data_chunk,out)
#407 µs ± 5.4 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
#11759 MB/s

%timeit read_uint12_griff(data_chunk)
#10.2 ms ± 55.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
#491 MB/s

%timeit read_uint12_var_2(data_chunk)
#928 µs ± 16.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
#5297 MB/s
%timeit read_uint12_var_2_prealloc(data_chunk,out)
#403 µs ± 13.4 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
#12227 MB/s
5
  • Thank's a lot for the tip with numba. I had similar issues with computation time needed for the conversion. I tried it with bitArray and bitString package but than looping was simply too slow. Implementing it in your most recently suggested way did it! Again, thank's, great answer.
    – BeCurious
    Apr 12, 2020 at 16:17
  • Hey @max9111, This is a great answer, could you advise on modifying this numba operation for the answer below (it uses a different packing/bit order). This would be super useful!
    – Gittb
    Apr 16, 2020 at 22:21
  • @Gittb Which one do you mean (username)? The ordering of the answers may differ. (I see my answer as the last one) Yes, but not today. At the weekend.
    – max9111
    Apr 16, 2020 at 22:33
  • The solution by the username @DGrifffith No rush on the time. I appreciate your help. If you could ping me when you worked it that would be awesome.
    – Gittb
    Apr 16, 2020 at 23:56
  • Thank you Max, I really appreciate this!!
    – Gittb
    Apr 22, 2020 at 17:15
3

Found @cyrilgaudefroy answer useful. However, initially, it did not work on my 12-bit packed binary image data. Found out that the packing is a bit different in this particular case. The "middle" byte contained the least significant nibbles. Bytes 1 and 3 of the triplet are the most significant 8 bits of the twelve. Hence modified @cyrilgaudefroy answer to:

def read_uint12(data_chunk):
    data = np.frombuffer(data_chunk, dtype=np.uint8)
    fst_uint8, mid_uint8, lst_uint8 = np.reshape(data, (data.shape[0] // 3, 3)).astype(np.uint16).T
    fst_uint12 = (fst_uint8 << 4) + (mid_uint8 >> 4)
    snd_uint12 = (lst_uint8 << 4) + (np.bitwise_and(15, mid_uint8))
    return np.reshape(np.concatenate((fst_uint12[:, None], snd_uint12[:, None]), axis=1), 2 * fst_uint12.shape[0])
1
  • This is seems common for 12bit packed pixel data.
    – marscher
    Apr 17 at 13:52
2

Here's yet another variation. My data format is:

first uint12: most significant 4 bits from least significant 4 bits of second uint8 + least significant 8 bits from first uint8

second uint12: most significant 8 bits from third uint8 + least significant 4 bits from most significant 4 bits from second uint8

The corresponding code is:

def read_uint12(data_chunk):
    data = np.frombuffer(data_chunk, dtype=np.uint8)
    fst_uint8, mid_uint8, lst_uint8 = np.reshape(data, (data.shape[0] // 3, 3)).astype(np.uint16).T
    fst_uint12 = ((mid_uint8 & 0x0F) << 8) | fst_uint8
    snd_uint12 = (lst_uint8 << 4) | ((mid_uint8 & 0xF0) >> 4)
    return np.reshape(np.concatenate((fst_uint12[:, None], snd_uint12[:, None]), axis=1), 2 * fst_uint12.shape[0])
1
  • This variant worked for me as well. It matches Matlab's ubit12 representation.
    – erikreed
    Aug 2, 2021 at 20:39

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