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This question already has an answer here:

(i5 ivybridge cpu windows 10) Map seems to come out slower every time, for what is a very long list, where it should do well

import time
l = [2049 for i in range(20000000)]
def f(e):
    return (e * 2) - 56

st = time.time()
l = list(map(f,l))
end = time.time()
print ("map: "+str(end-st))

l = [2049 for i in range(20000000)]

st = time.time()
l = [f(e) for e in l]
end = time.time()
print ("list comp: "+str(end-st))

prints:

map: 4.037442207336426
list comp: 3.9109268188476562

marked as duplicate by jonrsharpe, ayhan python Jun 24 '17 at 20:15

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    "it should do well" - what makes you say that? – jonrsharpe Jun 24 '17 at 20:07
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    It's not clear to me what you think the difference between "[mapping] a function to every element" and "[assessing] the function call for every iteration" is. You have to call f for every item in l either way; both are O(n), it's only the fixed costs that vary. – jonrsharpe Jun 24 '17 at 20:10
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    The list comp also makes it easy to avoid the function call entirely in your case for a substantial increase in speed. – pvg Jun 24 '17 at 20:14
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    You could, however, since map returns a mapping object, run a for loop on it without having to build a list first(kind of like a generator), this might save you some(but not a lot) of time. Just for clarification, the map() function you run there takes about 0.0004 seconds to run - what takes the time is the list() operation. – doratheexplorer0911 Jun 24 '17 at 20:33
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    What I said is good especially for saving memory rather than speed. – doratheexplorer0911 Jun 24 '17 at 20:39