0

How do I get over something like this:

struct Test {
    foo: Option<fn()>
}

impl Test {
    fn new(&mut self) {
        self.foo = Option::Some(self.a);
    }

    fn a(&self) { /* can use Test */ }
}

I get this error:

error: attempted to take value of method `a` on type `&mut Test`
 --> src/main.rs:7:36
  |
7 |             self.foo = Option::Some(self.a);
  |                                          ^
  |
  = help: maybe a `()` to call it is missing? If not, try an anonymous function

How do I pass a function pointer from a trait? Similar to what would happen in this case:

impl Test {
    fn new(&mut self) {
        self.foo = Option::Some(a);
    }
}

fn a() { /* can't use Test */ }
2

There are few mistakes with your code. new function (by the convention) should not take self reference, since it is expected to create Self type.

But the real issue is, Test::foo expecting a function type fn(), but Test::a's type is fn(&Test) == fn a(&self) if you change the type of foo to fn(&Test) it will work. Also you need to use function name with the trait name instead of self. Instead of assigning to self.a you should assign Test::a.

Here is the working version:

extern crate chrono;

struct Test {
    foo: Option<fn(&Test)>
}

impl Test {
    fn new() -> Test {
        Test {
            foo: Some(Test::a)
        }
    }

    fn a(&self) {
        println!("a run!");
    }
}

fn main() {
    let test = Test::new();
    test.foo.unwrap()(&test);
}

Also if you gonna assign a field in new() function, and the value must always set, then there is no need to use Option instead it can be like that:

extern crate chrono;

struct Test {
    foo: fn(&Test)
}

impl Test {
    fn new() -> Test {
        Test {
            foo: Test::a
        }
    }

    fn a(&self) {
        println!("a run!");
    }
}

fn main() {
    let test = Test::new();
    (test.foo)(&test); // Make sure the paranthesis are there
}
  • Also you can use Self (capital S) in traits and impls. In your case for example you can change new function's return type to Self instead of keep repeating Test. – Umur Gedik Jun 25 '17 at 4:39
3

What you're trying to do here is get a function pointer from a (to use Python terminology here, since Rust doesn't have a word for this) bound method. You can't.

Firstly, because Rust doesn't have a concept of "bound" methods; that is, you can't refer to a method with the invocant (the thing on the left of the .) already bound in place. If you want to construct a callable which approximates this, you'd use a closure; i.e. || self.a().

However, this still wouldn't work because closures aren't function pointers. There is no "base type" for callable things like in some other languages. Function pointers are a single, specific kind of callable; closures are completely different. Instead, there are traits which (when implemented) make a type callable. They are Fn, FnMut, and FnOnce. Because they are traits, you can't use them as types, and must instead use them from behind some layer of indirection, such as Box<FnOnce()> or &mut FnMut(i32) -> String.

Now, you could change Test to store an Option<Box<Fn()>> instead, but that still wouldn't help. That's because of the other, other problem: you're trying to store a reference to the struct inside of itself. This is not going to work well. If you manage to do this, you effectively render the Test value permanently unusable. More likely is that the compiler just won't let you get that far.

Aside: you can do it, but not without resorting to reference counting and dynamic borrow checking, which is out of scope here.

So the answer to your question as-asked is: you don't.

Let's change the question: instead of trying to crowbar a self-referential closure in, we can instead store a callable that doesn't attempt to capture the invocant at all.

struct Test {
    foo: Option<Box<Fn(&Test)>>,
}

impl Test {
    fn new() -> Test {
        Test {
            foo: Option::Some(Box::new(Self::a)),
        }
    }

    fn a(&self) { /* can use Test */ }

    fn invoke(&self) {
        if let Some(f) = self.foo.as_ref() {
            f(self);
        }
    }
}

fn main() {
    let t = Test::new();
    t.invoke();
}

The callable being stored is now a function that takes the invocant explicitly, side-stepping the issues with cyclic references. We can use this to store Test::a directly, by referring to it as a free function. Also note that because Test is the implementation type, I can also refer to it as Self.

Aside: I've also corrected your Test::new function. Rust doesn't have constructors, just functions that return values like any other.

If you're confident you will never want to store a closure in foo, you can replace Box<Fn(&Test)> with fn(&Test) instead. This limits you to function pointers, but avoids the extra allocation.

If you haven't already, I strongly urge you to read the Rust Book.

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