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I am new to tensorflow , I am not able to understand the difference of variable and constant, I get the idea that we use variables for equations and constants for direct values , but why code #1 works only and why not code#2 and #3, and please explain in which cases we have to run our graph first(a) and then our variable(b) i.e

 (a) session.run(model)
 (b) print(session.run(y))

and in which case I can directly execute this command i.e

print(session.run(y))

Code #1 :

x = tf.constant(35, name='x')
y = tf.Variable(x + 5, name='y')

model = tf.global_variables_initializer() 

with tf.Session() as session:
    session.run(model)
    print(session.run(y))

Code #2 :

x = tf.Variable(35, name='x')
y = tf.Variable(x + 5, name='y')

model = tf.global_variables_initializer() 

with tf.Session() as session:
    session.run(model)
    print(session.run(y))

Code #3 :

x = tf.constant(35, name='x')
y = tf.constant(x + 5, name='y')

model = tf.global_variables_initializer() 

with tf.Session() as session:
    session.run(model)
    print(session.run(y))
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  • 1
    As of now (Sep 2019), code #2 works for tensorflow 1.14 – yuqli Sep 14 '19 at 22:53
35

In TensorFlow the differences between constants and variables are that when you declare some constant, its value can't be changed in the future (also the initialization should be with a value, not with operation).

Nevertheless, when you declare a Variable, you can change its value in the future with tf.assign() method (and the initialization can be achieved with a value or operation).

The function tf.global_variables_initializer() initialises all variables in your code with the value passed as parameter, but it works in async mode, so doesn't work properly when dependencies exists between variables.

Your first code (#1) works properly because there is no dependencies on variable initialization and the constant is constructed with a value.

The second code (#2) doesn't work because of the async behavior of tf.global_variables_initializer(). You can fix it using tf.variables_initializer() as follows:

x = tf.Variable(35, name='x')
model_x = tf.variables_initializer([x])

y = tf.Variable(x + 5, name='y')
model_y = tf.variables_initializer([y])


with tf.Session() as session:
   session.run(model_x)
   session.run(model_y)
   print(session.run(y))

The third code (#3) doesn't work properly because you are trying to initialize a constant with an operation, that isn't possible. To solve it, an appropriate strategy is (#1).

Regarding to your last question. You need to run (a) session.run(model) when there are variables in your calculation graph (b) print(session.run(y)).

4
  • 1 more question , I came to know that the value of 'y' is computed when we use this statement 'session.run(y)' , so what was the purpose of running 'session.run(model)', didn't it execute the graph for value computation ? – Daniyal Javaid Jun 26 '17 at 10:23
  • When you run a variable, it returns the value of it. It's necessary to be initialized first, so it's a two phase process. – garciparedes Jun 26 '17 at 10:27
  • 1
    so this line 'model = tf.global_variables_initializer() ' means , i just assigned the graph/model to the variable named 'model' , but this graph executes / initializes the variables when I run 'session.run(model)' , am i right? – Daniyal Javaid Jun 26 '17 at 10:31
  • 1
    Also worth mentioning, that one cannot save a tf.constant with tf.train.Saver – Oleg Afanasyev Dec 5 '17 at 11:49
3

I will point the difference when using eager execution.

As of Tensorflow 2.0.b1, Variables and Constant trigger different behaviours when using tf.GradientTape. Strangely, the official document is not verbal about it enough.

Let's look at the example code in https://www.tensorflow.org/versions/r2.0/api_docs/python/tf/GradientTape

x = tf.constant(3.0)
with tf.GradientTape(persistent=True) as g:
  g.watch(x)
  y = x * x
  z = y * y
dz_dx = g.gradient(z, x)  # 108.0 (4*x^3 at x = 3)
dy_dx = g.gradient(y, x)  # 6.0
del g  # Drop the reference to the tape

You had to watch x which is a Constant. GradientTape does NOT automatically watch constants in the context. Additionally, it can watch only one tensor per GradientTape. If you want to get gradients of multiple Constants, you need to nest GradientTapes. For example,

x = tf.constant(3.0)
x2 = tf.constant(3.0)
with tf.GradientTape(persistent=True) as g:
  g.watch(x)
  with tf.GradientTape(persistent=True) as g2:
    g2.watch(x2)

    y = x * x
    y2 = y * x2

dy_dx = g.gradient(y, x)       # 6
dy2_dx2 = g2.gradient(y2, x2)  # 9
del g, g2  # Drop the reference to the tape

On the other hand, Variables are automatically watched by GradientTape.

By default GradientTape will automatically watch any trainable variables that are accessed inside the context. Source: https://www.tensorflow.org/versions/r2.0/api_docs/python/tf/GradientTape

So the above will look like,

x = tf.Variable(3.0)
x2 = tf.Variable(3.0)
with tf.GradientTape(persistent=True) as g:
    y = x * x
    y2 = y * x2

dy_dx = g.gradient(y, x)       # 6
dy2_dx2 = g.gradient(y2, x2)   # 9
del g  # Drop the reference to the tape
print(dy_dx)
print(dy2_dx2)

Of course, you can turn off the automatic watching by passing watch_accessed_variables=False. The examples may not be so practical but I hope this clears someone's confusion.

1
  • I'm pretty sure you can pass multiple tensors as an array into GradientTape.watch. Maybe the API changed since you wrote this – Azmisov Dec 31 '19 at 17:57

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