I am using Boost’s promises and futures and encountered an edge case while using continuations. My code uses a continuation that returns a future, and unwraps then()’s result before getting its value.

#define BOOST_THREAD_VERSION 5

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread/future.hpp>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    boost::promise<int> promise;
    boost::future<int> future = promise.get_future();

    promise.set_value(42);

    int result = future.then(
        boost::launch::async,
        [](boost::future<int> result)
        {
            return boost::make_ready_future(result.get());
        }
    ).unwrap().get();

    std::cout << "Result is: " << result << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

In this example, I explicitly used the boost::launch::async policy to launch the continuation in a new thread, and I get the expected result of 42.

However, as soon as I replace that policy with boost::launch::deferred, the program seems to deadlock. What am I doing wrong?

NB: The deferred continuation works correctly as long as I don’t unwrap() its value. The issue is specifically about unwrapped deferred continuations.

  • What happens when you return result.get() from the callback and then call get() without unwrapping? – Curious Jun 25 '17 at 17:47
  • 1
    When I don’t use unwrap(), it actually works correctly. In this case, the use of unwrap() is trivial but I tried to simplify the question down to a minimum. I will edit my question to make that clear, thanks for the heads-up! – matteodelabre Jun 25 '17 at 17:57
  • 3
    If you still want to know the answer to this question, I think you should set up a bounty for it, and offer 50 of your own rep to the answerer. I have a feeling this is happening because the deferred callback means that it is executed when you call get() on the resulting future, but after you call unwrap() the resulting future is no longer the one you call get() on, so no callbacks are called. The callbacks essentially are not carried over. But I am not sure as to why such a decision was made by Boost, therefore the bounty might help! – Curious Jun 27 '17 at 1:28
  • The ticket has been locked for this- svn.boost.org/trac10/ticket/10964 Reference : boost.future: are these two pieces of code equivalent? /HT @Ayush Pant – sehe Nov 1 '17 at 22:46

I think the future continuation paired with unwrap does not make sense. If you create a future with .then, you will get a valid future. So you can call .get() without blocking. That is why I dont see the need for a nested future. However, the way you wrote it should not cause a deadlock and it is probably a bug.

#define BOOST_THREAD_VERSION 5

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread/future.hpp>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    boost::promise<int> promise;
    boost::future<int> future = promise.get_future();

    promise.set_value(42);

    int result = future.then(
        boost::launch::deferred,
        [](boost::future<int> result)
        {
            return result.get(); // get is non-blocking, since it is a continuation
        }
    )/*.unwrap()*/.get();

    std::cout << "Result is: " << result << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

As of boost 1.64, unwrap is still a experimental function. It would be nice, if you communicate this behaviour to the developer of boost::thread.

  • Thanks for your answer! As I mentioned in the question’s comments, the example I gave for unwrapping is obviously trivial and can be circumvented. However, in my application, I have a use case that cannot avoid using unwrap. I will report that to Boost developers. – matteodelabre Jul 5 '17 at 6:37
  • Future continuation and unwrap does not work in conjunction. But you can create a new nested future and it will work there. – OutOfBound Jul 5 '17 at 7:09
  • Even if I create a new future, it causes a deadlock. Could you show an example of a working continuation with a new nested future, please? – matteodelabre Jul 5 '17 at 7:15
  • I digged a bit deeper into the implementation and found out, that unwrap will construct a new future and it will not keep the deferred flag and the function to be executed. It will only keep the state, which is moved out of the original future. That is the reason, why it deadlocks. It waits on the completion of the original future. I'm sorry, but you have to redesign and avoid unwrap if you want to use deferred execution. – OutOfBound Jul 5 '17 at 8:32
  • Thanks for your help! I will report that to Boost devs to see if this is expected behaviour. – matteodelabre Jul 5 '17 at 8:45

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.