6

With PWA, now we can handle when the device connection is down with offline mode. But the question is when user fixed their connection, how we detect it and automatically reload/re-active the application so that user don't have to do it themself?

20

You could monitor the offline and online events, which is widely supported:

// Test this by running the code snippet below and then
// use the "Offline" checkbox in DevTools Network panel

window.addEventListener('load', function() {
  function updateOnlineStatus(event) {
    if (navigator.onLine) {
      // handle online status
      console.log('online');
    } else {
      // handle offline status
      console.log('offline');
    }
  }

  window.addEventListener('online', updateOnlineStatus);
  window.addEventListener('offline', updateOnlineStatus);
});

One technique of handling this:

  • Offline event

    • show offline icon/status
    • enable only features that are available offline (via cached data)
  • Online event

    • show online icon/status
    • enable all features
  • this however doesn't tell you if your server is reachable – CoderPi Nov 17 '18 at 21:39
11

Be careful with the online event, that only tells the device if connected. It can be connected to a WiFi hotspot without actual Internet connectivity (because of credentials for example).

  • 4
    You could ping your server when the online event is fired to verify you have access to your data. – Michael Warner Jul 31 '18 at 19:30
  • Indeed, you're right. – Nicolas Hoizey Jul 31 '18 at 21:36
2

A common practice in PWAs is to follow the Application Shell approach to your application. This would allow you to cache the Application Shell upon entry, and then load the data based upon the connection.

The most common method for caching and serving in this approach is to serve from cache with fallback to network, where whenever the resource requested is not available in the cache then you send the request via the network and cache the response. Then serve from the cache.

This allows for a more graceful degradation when you are on a spotty connection, such as on the train.

An example of implementing this:

const cacheName = "my-cache-v1"

self.addEventListener('fetch', (event) => {
  if (event.request.method === 'GET') {
    event.respondWith(
      caches.match(event.request).then((response) => {
        if (response) {
          return response;
        }
        return fetch(event.request).then((response) => {
          return caches.open(cacheName).then((cache) => {
            cache.put(event.request.url, response.clone());
            return response;
          });
        });
      })
    );
  }
});

In the above example (only one of the required steps in a Service Worker life cycle), you would also need to delete outdated cache entries.

  • I agree with the offline first strategy, but Application Shell is only one of the architecture you can use. I don't think it's "the best practice" for PWAs. It depends a lot on the kind of site/app you're building. – Nicolas Hoizey Feb 23 '18 at 13:15
  • I agree, I'll update my answer accordingly – LeonH Feb 23 '18 at 13:30
  • Great, thanks! 👍🏻 – Nicolas Hoizey Feb 23 '18 at 17:14
1

Most of the services I've seen use the following practice: with an increasing to a certain value timeout, trying to contact the server. When the maximum timeout value is reached, an indicator with a manual recconect button appears which indicates in how many time the next attempt of reconnect will occur

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