8

For arguments sake let's say that I am on the Create View. If I left all of the textboxes empty and hit submit, I would get returned the same form but with validation messages under each textbox that was required, and that was done by client side validation. Now, when that happens, each textbox is decorated with a class name called input-validation-error, and if I style that I can make the box turn red to make it stand out more to the user.

But now, let's say that one of the textboxes requires an email address. Email addresses are unique so in my webapi controller I have this:

// POST: api/ControllerName
[ResponseType(typeof(TestObject))]
public IHttpActionResult PostTestObject(TestObject testObject)
{
    if (!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        return BadRequest(ModelState);
    }

    if (
        db.TestObjects.Any(
            x =>
                x.Email.Equals(testObject.Email, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) &&
                x.ID != testObject.ID))
    {
            ModelState.AddModelError("Email", "This Email Already Exists!");
            return BadRequest(ModelState);
    }

    db.TestObjects.Add(testObject);
    db.SaveChanges();

    return CreatedAtRoute("DefaultApi", new { id = testObject.ID }, testObject);
}

In my Create View I have this to display that exception message:

.error(function (jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
    var status = capitalizeFirstLetter(textStatus);
    var error = $.parseJSON(jqXHR.responseText);
    toastr.error(status + " - " + error.exceptionMessage);
 });

This displays the exception message in a toastr notification. But it doesn't give the email textbox a class name of input-validation-error, and I would like it to so that it will display the textbox in red.

Is there a way in WebApi controller methods to return something that will add that class to that textbox? I know in regular .Net controllers I could do

ModelState.AddModelError("Email", "This email already exists!")
return View(testObject);

That would return the view with that textbox having the css class name.

Any help is appreciated.

Based on Nkosi's answer below:

When I console.log(JSON.stringify(error));

The response is this:

{"$id":"1","message":"The request is invalid.","modelState":
{"$id":"2","email":["This Email Already Exists!"]}} 

Okay, so I have changed the formatting to fit the JSON response, and I have also changed the var id line to var id = "#" + key.replace('$', '');

Now I am receiving an error on valmsg.text(value.join()); saying Object doesn't support property or method 'join'.. so I consoled the value and it is 2.. not "This Email Already Exists!"

UPDATE

.error(function (jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
    var error = jqXHR.responseJSON;
    console.log(JSON.stringify(error));
    var message = error.message;
    var modelState = error.modelState;

    $.each(modelState,
        function (key, value) {
            var id = "#" + key.replace('$', '');
            var input = $(id);
            console.log(id); // result is #id
            if (input) { // if element exists
                input.addClass('input-validation-error');
            }
            //get validation message
            var valmsg = $("[data-valmsg-for='" + key + "']");
            if (valmsg) {
                valmsg.text(value.join()); // Object doesn't support property or method 'join'
                valmsg.removeClass("field-validation-valid");
                valmsg.addClass("field-validation-error");
            }
  • 2
    That's up to you; you can send any response you want, and handle it however you like in your JS code. – SLaks Jun 26 '17 at 18:06
  • @SLaks could you show me some code? Or point me in a direction where someone has done something like this? – Grizzly Jun 26 '17 at 18:17
  • @BviLLe_Kid I can recommend this link exceptionnotfound.net/… – hasan Jun 28 '17 at 18:59
2
+100

UPDATE

based on this sample data

{"$id":"1","message":"The request is invalid.","modelState":
{"$id":"2","email":["This Email Already Exists!"]}} 

The snippet to highlight the invalid elements would become

var handleError = function (jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
    var error = jqXHR.responseJSON;        
    var message = error.message;
    var modelState = error.modelState;
    //highlight invalid fields                    
    $.each(modelState, function (key, value) {
        var id = "#" + key; //construct id
        var input = $(id); //get the element
        if(input) { //if element exists
            input.addClass('input-validation-error'); //update class
        }            
    });
}

Original

The following POC was used to demonstrate the original issue

WebApi

[HttpGet]
[Route("testobject")]
public IHttpActionResult TestObject() {
    ModelState.AddModelError("Email", "This Email Already Exists!");
    return BadRequest(ModelState);
}

MVC Controller

[HttpGet, Route("")]
public ActionResult Index() {
    var model = new TestVM();
    return View(model);
}

MVC View: Index

@model TestVM
@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Index";
}
<div class="container">
    <div class="form-group">
        @Html.LabelFor(m => m.Email)
        @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Email, new { data_bind = "value: Email", @class = "form-control" })
        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Email)
    </div>
    <button type="button" data-bind="click: testEmail" class="btn btn-success submit">Test</button>
</div>

@section Scripts {
    @Scripts.Render("~/bundles/jqueryval", "~/bundles/knockout")
    <script type="text/javascript">
        //Pay no attention to this. custom strongly typed helper for routes
        var url = '@(Url.HttpRouteUrl<TestsApiController>(c => c.TestObject()))';
        $(function () {
            /*using knockout for binding*/
            function viewModel() {
                var self = this;
                //properties
                self.Email = ko.observable(@(Model.Email));
                //methods
                self.testEmail = function () {
                    $.ajax({
                        url: url,
                        type: 'Get',
                        contentType: 'application/json',
                        dataType: 'json',
                        success: handleResponse,
                        error: handleError,
                    });
                };

                var handleError = function (jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
                    var error = jqXHR.responseJSON;
                    console.log(JSON.stringify(error));
                    var message = error.Message;
                    var modelState = error.ModelState;
                    //highlight invalid fields                    
                    $.each(modelState, function (key, value) {
                        var id = "#" + key;
                        $(id).addClass('input-validation-error');
                        //get validation message
                        var valmsg = $("[data-valmsg-for='" + key + "']");
                        if (valmsg) {
                            valmsg.text(value.join());
                            valmsg.removeClass("field-validation-valid");
                            valmsg.addClass("field-validation-error");
                        }
                    });
                }

                var handleResponse = function (data) {
                    //No-op
                };
            }
            var vm = new viewModel();
            ko.applyBindings(vm);
        });

    </script>
}

Using the above proof of concept based on the original example in the question, the resulting model returned looked like this.

{"Message":"The request is invalid.","ModelState":{"Email":["This Email Already Exists!"]}}

Focusing primarily on handling the error response returned I was able to achieve the desired behavior using the following structure.

var handleError = function (jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
    var error = jqXHR.responseJSON;
    console.log(JSON.stringify(error));
    //logs {"Message":"The request is invalid.","ModelState":{"Email":["This Email Already Exists!"]}}
    var message = error.Message;
    var modelState = error.ModelState;
    //highlight invalid fields                    
    $.each(modelState, function (key, value) {
        var id = "#" + key;
        $(id).addClass('input-validation-error');
        //get validation message
        var valmsg = $("[data-valmsg-for='" + key + "']");
        if (valmsg) {
            valmsg.text(value.join());
            valmsg.removeClass("field-validation-valid");
            valmsg.addClass("field-validation-error");
        }
    });
}

The above when executed resulted in

image

From a view that had the following

<div class="container">
    <div class="form-group">
        @Html.LabelFor(m => m.Email)
        @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Email, new { data_bind = "value: Email", @class = "form-control" })
        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Email)
    </div>
    <button type="button" data-bind="click: testEmail" class="btn btn-success submit">Test</button>
</div>
0

Did you try

return BadRequest("This Email Already Exists!");

another version of BadRequest instead of throwing exception?

  • 1
    This solution doesn't make the textbox get a css class name of input-validation-error – Grizzly Jun 26 '17 at 18:27
0

When your view/html calls the Web API method then Web API basically has no idea your page or input boxes even exist. It purely gets some input and returns some output. In this case because you've thrown an exception in Web API the http response is then an error code 500 for a "internal server error". This would cause the xhr error handler to run. It's not ideal because of something else ever went wrong (database down, client connection dropped, etc) you will be displaying the email validation error. A better idea would be to return a more informative response giving results of validation on each field, but then you need a response type with a bit more in it than a TestObject, something like a Result where result has some fields for validation errors.

As a quick workaround you will probably want to use some front end UI library to manually add that class to the field. Example in JQuery, just before/after your toastr line:

$('#emailfield').addClass('input-validation-error')

  • I apologize. I just updated my question. I am no longer returning just a generic exception. Rather a ModelState. – Grizzly Jun 29 '17 at 17:45
  • Ok. That's better. I'm not 100% sure what the contents of the response would be. The best thing to do would be to set a breakpoint in your browser on the "toastr" line and then inspect the contents of "error". The ModelState won't do anything "automatically" like if you were rendering a new view with MVC so you'll have to "manually" check for what you want in "error" and updated the UI. – Rory Jun 29 '17 at 20:51
0

You should have to add input-validation-error class in your .error function to desired text box or control.

register following script to validate

$(".selector").validate({
    highlight: function(element, errorClass) {
        // Override the default behavior here
    }
});
0

If you are returning in your controller:

ModelState.AddModelError("Email", "This Email Already Exists!");
return BadRequest(ModelState);

Then the json returned should be:

{"Email":["This Email Already Exists!"]}

In the HTML output on your view, you should have an an input for which will have the name attribute set to Email:

<input name="Email" type="text" />

Similarly, all other keys in the error JSON will have a matching form controls with the name attributes matching those keys.

So in your error function, you can loop through the keys and apply the appropriate CSS class:

.error(function (jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
    var error = $.parseJSON(jqXHR.responseText);
    $(error).each(function(i,e)
    {
        $('[name="' + e + '"]').addClass('input-validation-error');
    });

 });
0

I would recommend you to use FluentValidation.

Check this great article.

So using this approach you will be able to move your validation logic out from the controller and make error responses follow the pattern.

But in order to add css classes on the client side you will have to replace public List<string> Errors { get; set; } in ResponsePackeage with public Dictionary<string, string> Errors { get; set; } where key will be a property name and the value will be a related error message.

Good luck!

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