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It is well-known that the equals() method of an object, if not overridden, is a "shallow comparison" that is equivalent to using the "==" operator. (See, for example, https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/objectclass.html.)

Question: why doesn't Java provide a "deep-comparison" equals() method by default? That is, one that will invoke equals() on each of its instance variables recursively. Eventually, the recursion will reach primitive types and stop. Are there any downsides if this deep-comparison equals was the default?

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  • Performance for starters. Have you measured the impact of doing this during jvm start up? – efekctive Jun 26 '17 at 21:45
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    How would you suggest that a generic implementation of this would work? – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jun 26 '17 at 21:51
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    How would the implementation distinguish between references that are part of the logical value of the object, and references that are mere associations? How would the implementation deal with reference graphs that contain cycles? Note that the definition was created before annotations were added to the language. – Andy Thomas Jun 26 '17 at 21:52
  • The semantics of "equality" between objects is too flexible. There are many cases where objects are equal even though they have some fields with different values. For example, it is common to have a data object with an id field - the ID is usually sufficient. Another common example - a data object with some current state fields, e.g. date / time fields like "lastUpdated" - this should not affect the equality of the objects. Bottom line - it is better to be safe then sorry, and in this case - have a strict default that won't cause some weird behaviors. – yinon Jun 26 '17 at 21:54
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    @svasa and Thorbjørn, as for the implementation, perhaps a first try would be to do this in compilation: the compiler finds all the instance variables, and generate an equals() that calls `equals() recursively on these variables. This will avoid the reflection overhead at runtime. – flow2k Jun 26 '17 at 23:28
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Are there any downsides if this deep-comparison equals was the default?

Yes. These include:

  • The default implementation cannot distinguish between references that are part of the logical value of the object, and references that are just associations with other objects. For example, say you have a Person class that references a company. You have two Person instances with the same name, SSN, DOB, etc. One references an old company. You may want the two Person instances, that reference the same actual person, to be equal, even though one has an outdated association.
  • A deep equality test would frequently be slower than the current default, possibly significantly slower. Frequently this would be unnecessary. The current default insures that the equality test is always fast unless someone specifies otherwise explicitly.
  • A deep comparison would need to handle cycles in the references. This would require some way to remember what objects had already been traversed. This would require memory to track those objects, potentially a significant amount of memory. An equality test could lead to an OutOfMemoryError.

The current default implementation is fast and makes no assumptions. It's a good default. Sometimes you will need to override the default, using your knowledge about what the logical value of the object contains, regardless of its root physical representation.

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A deep compare is much more complex and time consuming than a comparison of two references. This might be ok for simple objects, but when you have really complex data structures (e.g. a tree with ten thousand elements) how should the system know how "deep" the compare should be?

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    Any equality test for a tree would cover all the nodes. It could be slow regardless whether the implementation is by default or ad hoc. A real issue is graphs with cycles. A tree implementation with pointers to parent nodes would contain cycles of references between parent and child nodes. – Andy Thomas Jun 26 '17 at 22:01
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For most objects reference equality is the correct implementation. "Deep" equals is for the minority that maintain state. Not only would your proposal run into the problems many here described, it would be wrong for most types.

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  • That's a very strong statement. The logical value of an object does not always correspond to its physical representation. And the default implementation does not test equality even of referenced String objects. – Andy Thomas Jun 26 '17 at 22:05
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    I disagree that it's the "correct" implementation for most objects: just look at how many classes you have to override equals in. Just looking at the JDK source code, it is not the majority, but it is certainly not an inconsequential number either. – Andy Turner Jun 26 '17 at 22:07
  • The claim is "most types" have identity as the appropriate equivalence relation, not "all types". And no claim was made that value objects are an "inconsequential" minority. Nor was anything said about physical representation. You're fighting a paper tiger. – Lew Bloch Jun 26 '17 at 23:30
  • You're fighting a straw man. Both of us andy's disagreed with your assertion that reference equality was sufficient for "most types." Neither of us suggested that it was insufficient for all. – Andy Thomas Jun 26 '17 at 23:38
  • @AndyTurner said, "... just look at how many classes you have to override equals in. Just looking at the JDK source code, it is not the majority, ..." – Lew Bloch Jun 27 '17 at 0:07

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