17

Let's say I had the string

"[1,2,[3,4,[5,6]],7]"

How would I parse that into the array

[1,2,[3,4,[5,6]],7]

?

Nesting structures and patterns are completely arbitrary in my usage case.

My current ad-hoc solution involves adding a space after every period and using YAML.load, but I'd like to have a cleaner one if possible.

(One that does not require external libraries if possible)

40

That particular example is being parsed correctly using JSON:

s = "[1,2,[3,4,[5,6]],7]"
#=> "[1,2,[3,4,[5,6]],7]"
require 'json'
#=> true
JSON.parse s
#=> [1, 2, [3, 4, [5, 6]], 7]

If that doesn't work, you can try running the string through eval, but you have to ensure that no actual ruby code has been passed, as eval could be used as injection vulnerability.

Edit: Here is a simple recursive, regex based parser, no validation, not tested, not for production use etc:

def my_scan s
  res = []
  s.scan(/((\d+)|(\[(.+)\]))/) do |match|
    if match[1]
      res << match[1].to_i
    elsif match[3]
      res << my_scan(match[3])
    end
  end
  res
end

s = "[1,2,[3,4,[5,6]],7]"
p my_scan(s).first #=> [1, 2, [3, 4, [5, 6]], 7]
  • I'd like to use this, but I can't quite get json to run properly on my computer, and in any case it wouldn't be much cleaner than the yaml solution. Is there a way to manually code this parsing? – Justin L. Dec 18 '10 at 7:48
  • Not sure what do you mean by "not clean", as it is one method call to parse it. You could of course either write a simple regex-based parser of your own, or use dedicated tools, such as treetop.rubyforge.org but neither of those is simple as JSON.parse IMHO. – Mladen Jablanović Dec 18 '10 at 8:16
  • Oh, and JSON is part of Ruby core lib, at least in 1.9.x. – Mladen Jablanović Dec 18 '10 at 9:22
  • If you have a multi-type array like s = "['hello', 2, 'test', 5.0]", JSON will fail to parse with a generic error unexpected token at .... However, YAML does work as shown in @Arup's answer: YAML.load(s) => ["hello", 2, "test", 5.0]. – Chris Cirefice Mar 10 '16 at 5:11
  • @ChrisCirefice: That's because single quoted strings are not valid JSON. – Mladen Jablanović Mar 10 '16 at 8:37
14

The same can be done using Ruby standard libaray YAML as below :

require 'yaml'
s = "[1,2,[3,4,[5,6]],7]"
YAML.load(s)
# => [1, 2, [3, 4, [5, 6]], 7]
  • +1; YAML successfully loads multi-type arrays, e.g. "['hello', 2, 'test', 5.0]", where JSON fails to parse. – Chris Cirefice Mar 10 '16 at 5:12
  • This has the advantage it does not throw an error if there is a nil element, but it outputs the nil as 'nil', so still need to convert that to a nil. – Obromios Jul 16 '17 at 5:53
4

"Obviously" the best solution is to write your own parser. [ If you like writing parsers, have never done it before and want to learn something new, or want control over the exact grammar ]

require 'parslet'

class Parser < Parslet::Parser
  rule(:space)       { str(' ') }
  rule(:space?)      { space.repeat(0) }
  rule(:openbrace_)  { str('[').as(:op) >> space? }
  rule(:closebrace_) { str(']').as(:cl) >> space? }
  rule(:comma_)      { str(',') >> space?  }
  rule(:integer)     { match['0-9'].repeat(1).as(:int) }
  rule(:value)       { (array | integer) >> space? }
  rule(:list)        { value >> ( comma_ >> value ).repeat(0) }
  rule(:array)       { (openbrace_ >> list.maybe.as(:list) >> closebrace_ ).as(:arr)}
  rule(:nest)        { space? >> array.maybe }
  root(:nest)
end

class MyTransform < Parslet::Transform
  rule(:int => simple(:x))      { Integer(x) }
  rule(:op => '[', :cl => ']')   { [] }
  rule(:op => '[', :list => subtree(:x), :cl => ']')   { Array(x) }
  rule(:arr => subtree(:x))     { x }
end

def parse(s)
  MyTransform.new.apply(Parser.new.parse(s))
end

parse " [   1  ,   2  ,  [  3  ,  4  ,  [  5   ,  6  , [ ]]   ]  ,  7  ]  "
  • 2
    I would say that it isn't necessarily the obviously best solution, as it depends on the input and its format and how it is generated. However, it is one of the most flexible. Also, a full working parslet example is a rare treat so +1 to you! – Mark Thomas Jul 13 '15 at 1:51
  • I agree with @MarkThomas too... – Arup Rakshit Jul 13 '15 at 10:32
0

Use eval

array = eval("[1,2,[3,4,[5,6]],7]")
  • This isn't a part my application that I feel safe to leave vulnerable to injections, sorry. – Justin L. Dec 18 '10 at 7:57
  • @Justin L., A "clean room" + "sandbox" will protect you from the evils of eval: stackoverflow.com/questions/2045324/… . About all that is left to protect against is code that runs a long time; Timeout can take care of that. – Wayne Conrad Dec 18 '10 at 23:19
  • 1
    Do not do this. – bswinnerton Jun 2 '15 at 17:27
  • Please add a note of the security risks to your answer so you don't get downvotes. Some suggestion as to how to mitigate the risks would also be valuable. – Nigel Thorne Jul 13 '15 at 3:29
  • I agree with necessity to add warning about security, therefore I downvoted the otherwise fine solution. – gorn Dec 7 '16 at 15:05

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